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20 April 2014
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Family French
Activity

Once you have played the Numbers and Colours Game try this activity with your children.

You need different coloured sweets - smarties, jellybabies or whatever sweets you have at home.

Les Couleurs
bleu - blue
rouge - red
vert - green
jaune - yellow
orange - orange

Arrange them all on a table in front of your child.

First, go through the colours individually, encouraging your child to repeat the French words after you.

Next, arrange the sweets in sets of 1,2,3,4 and 5 together and go through the numbers in the same way, pointing to each set and getting your child to repeat the number after you.

Now introduce the word for sweet - 'un bonbon' - and ask your child to point to 'un bonbon rouge', 'un bonbon jaune' and so on.

Then introduce the words for 'I would like' - 'Je voudrais' - and ask your child to give you your choice of sweet, for example 'Je voudrais un bonbon orange'.

Les Nombres
un - one
deux - two
trois - three
quatre - four
cinq - five

If your child gives you the right sweet congratulate them with 'Merci' - 'Thanks' - and eat it if you like.

If they get it wrong just repeat your request.

Now it's your child's turn. Help them to say 'Je voudrais' and when they've mastered it add numbers - 'Je voudrais deux bonbons verts'.

Encourage your child when they do well or get something right. If they get it wrong, repeat the correct form afterwards. Try to keep it simple. If it's too complicated omit 'Je voudrais'.

You don't need to be able to speak much French yourself. If you're unsure of pronunciation, use the Numbers and Colours Game as a model and stick closely to those words. The most important thing is to want to do it and to make it fun!

This activity was created by Pascale Bizet, Language Learning Consultant.




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