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18 April 2014
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Danish, Dansk

Related languages Danish is a North Germanic language, on the same branch of the Indo-European family tree as Icelandic, Faroese, Norwegian, and Swedish.
European speakers 5,292,000 speakers
Territories Danish is the official language of Denmark. It's also the second official spoken language of the Faroe Islands (with Faroese) and Greenland (with Greenlandic) and is officially recognised in the bordering area of South Schleswig in Germany. It is one of the official languages of the European Union.
Alphabet Danish uses the Latin alphabet, plus æ, ø, å.
First examples Thanks to the exploration and expansion of the Vikings, Danish first appears in foreign texts such as the English poem Beowulf, and in place names (endings such as -thorpe, -gate, and -toft are all from Viking times) and loan words, such as 'law' and 'riding'.
Other facts The Dansk Sprognævn (Danish Language Council) collects and registers all new Danish words. As with all languages, modern Danish is influenced and enriched by foreign words. One of the Council's tasks is to decide which words are considered Danish, and which are loan words. 'Bar', 'bus', 'film' and 'slum' all fit Danish rules of spelling and pronunciation, and so are now considered Danish words, but 'freelance' and 'playboy' are used, but considered mere loan words.

Key Phrases
Ja.
Yes.
Nej.
No.
Velkommen!
Welcome!
Det glæder mig at træffe Dem.
Pleased to meet you.
Goddag.
Hello.
Farvel.
Goodbye.
Tak.
Thank you.
Jeg hedder ...
My name is ...
Taler De engelsk?
Do you speak English?
Undskyld, jeg kan ikke tale dansk.
I'm sorry, I don't speak Danish.
Vil De hjælpe mig?
I need help.
Undskyld, hvor er toilettet?
Where is the toilet, please?

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