How Musical Are You? – Experiment Credits

The BBC would like to thank the following for their part in creating 'How Musical Are You?':

Experiment design:

  • The survey questionnaire and the musical tests were developed by Daniel Müllensiefen, Bruno Gingras, and Lauren Stewart from the Music, Mind and Brain research group at Goldsmiths, University of London in collaboration with BBC Lab UK.

The BBC would also like to thank the following for the use of their measures in this experiment:

'Group the music' task:

The design of this test is based on procedures from the following studies:

  • Gjerdingen R.O. and Perrott, D. (2008). Scanning the dial: The rapid recognition of music genres. Journal of New Music Research 37(2), 93-100.
  • Krumhansl, C. (2010). Plink! Thin slices of music. Music Perception 27(5), 337-354.
  • Giordano, B. L., McDonnell, J., and McAdams, S. (2010). “Hearing living symbols and nonliving icons: Category specificities in the cognitive processing of environmental sounds,” Brain and Cognition, 73, 7-19.

‘Match the beat’ and ‘Tap to the beat’ task:

Both tests are closely based on the Beat Alignment Test developed by John Iversen and Ani Patel. Thanks to Jason Musil and Daniel Cameron for stimulus development.

  • Iversen, J. R., and Patel, A.D. (2008). The Beat Alignment Test (BAT): Surveying beat processing abilities in the general population. In Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition (ICMPC 10). Sapporo, Japan.

'Melody Memory' task:

There are many studies in the music psychology literature that use a similar experimental design. Two early examples are:

  • Bartlett, J.C. and Dowling, W.J. (1981). Recognition of transposed melodies: A key-distance effect in developmental perspective. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 6(3), 501-515.
  • Cuddy, L.L. and Lyons, H.I. (1981). Musical Pattern Recognition: A comparison of listening to and studying tonal structure and tonal ambiguities. Psychomusicology, 1(2), 15-33.

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