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15 October 2014
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Granny's Close Chave

by BBC Southern Counties Radio

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Archive List > Family Life

Contributed by 
BBC Southern Counties Radio
People in story: 
Mary Fairbrother nee Pope and Eliza Burt
Location of story: 
Rye, East Sussex
Background to story: 
Civilian
Article ID: 
A4391796
Contributed on: 
07 July 2005

This story was submitted to the People’s War site by Wendy Wood of Hastings Community Learning Centre, a volunteer from BBC Southern Counties Radio on behalf of Mary Fairbrother and has been added to the site with his/her permission. Mary Fairbrother fully understands the site’s terms and conditions.

I was 11 years old in 1941 and living in Rye, East Sussex. I used to visit my granny Mrs Eliza Burt every Sunday and she lived in the almshouses at the bottom of Watchbell Street. This Sunday I heard planes coming over and sirens sounding so I threw myself flat on the ground on the town salts under the trees just as mum had told me until the all clear went. Then I got up and went to granny’s where I found her almshouse had been flattened to the ground. Miraculously I then saw granny with a big wad of blood stained cotton wool on her face laying on the lap of Father Richard, the priest from the catholic church in Watchbell Street. She was taken to Rye hospital and my mum went with her. Her hearing was impaired but at least she was alive. My mum said granny would forgive the Germans everything apart from taking her home away from her

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