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15 October 2014
WW2 - People's War

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Lord Haw Haw's Broadcasts about Plymouthicon for Recommended story

by EEHUGHES

Contributed by 
EEHUGHES
People in story: 
Pat Hughes
Location of story: 
Plymouth, Devon
Background to story: 
Civilian
Article ID: 
A2154296
Contributed on: 
24 December 2003

My mother-in-law, who was 17 years old when WW2 broke out, would often tell of the effect Lord Haw Haw had during the war.

She lived in Plymouth and when the city was Blitzed a lot of Plymothians would make their way onto Dartmoor to avoid the bombs. They could only watch as Plymouth burned in the distance.

During Lord Haw Haw's broadcasts he would say he knew that the people of Plymouth were going up to the moors and that the bombs would get them as well, that there was no hiding place from Germany.

Although I have read that he was considered a laughing stock, my mother-in-law was quite scared of his broadcasts. She said he seemed to have a knowledge of local places and knew what people were doing and when. She said his broadcasts were so accurate about the activities and movements of the people of Plymouth it made her feel that he was right there among them.

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