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19 April 2014
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WW2 - People's War

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Contributed by 
Action Desk, BBC Radio Suffolk
People in story: 
Bob Coleman and family
Location of story: 
Ipswich, Suffolk
Background to story: 
Civilian
Article ID: 
A4176786
Contributed on: 
10 June 2005

Our family had an Anderson shelter in the backgarden. When the sirens went my stepmother and two sisters or whoever was at home at the time, would go into the shelter. Well on one particlular Monday morning in the summer of 1940, my sisters decided not to go down the shelter when the sirens went as it was raining. A bomb dropped and it fell onto the shelter. The shelter was blown over our house and landed in Foxhall Road, leaving our backgarden with an enormous crater. The houses on either side were also affected with blown out windows, but no structural damage. The families were evacuated to the big house in Chantry Park for about three weeks until our houses were fit to be lived in again. Not one person was hurt and I said at the time "if things like that can happen, we must get through this war". I joined the RAF during the latter part of 1940.

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