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15 October 2014
WW2 - People's War

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Hitler attacked my grandmother’s china

by cambsaction

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Contributed by 
cambsaction
People in story: 
Lesley Smetham
Location of story: 
Luton
Background to story: 
Civilian
Article ID: 
A7942584
Contributed on: 
21 December 2005

My grandmother was getting ready to go out one lunchtime and an air raid began, with German planes coming over. They used to attack Vauxhall’s and the other factories round about, where tanks and other armaments were manufactured. (To disguise these factories, their roofs had been painted green, in order to resemble trees and woodland). Once the raid was over, it was common for the pilots simply to dump the remaining bombs as they left. In consequence, one of the bombs fell on the house opposite my grandmother’s home — so the front of her own home was blown in, destroying all but about 2 pieces of her wedding present china: they had a really pretty bluebird design. She had been in hiding, as recommended. My grandfather was on his way home, and he sprinted up a really steep hill, thinking that she might have been caught in the raid but there she was, safely at the back of the house.

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