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Don’t Panic

by ateamwar

You are browsing in:

Archive List > Childhood and Evacuation

Contributed by 
ateamwar
People in story: 
Jeff Martin.
Location of story: 
Old Swan, Liverpool
Background to story: 
Civilian
Article ID: 
A5497770
Contributed on: 
02 September 2005

During the 2nd Word War rationing was very strict, if anyone asked for more than the usual amount of any goods people would presume that he or she had heard of possible shortages so therefore everyone would ask for larger amounts than usual.
One day my Grandmother, Mrs. C. Doolan, was in the queue at the CO-OP in Prescot Road, Old Swan, Liverpool, when a lady asked for 16lb of sugar. Immediately panic set in and everyone was asking for 16lb of sugar. Very soon the shop had no sugar left and the manager was hopping mad and shouted “Who the hell first asked for 16lb of sugar, and for heavens sake, why?’ The woman replied, “Haven’t you heard on the wireless — the Germans have taken Tuebrook!”
The Germans had actually taken Tobruk in North Africa but she thought she’d heard ‘Tuebrook.’

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