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WW2 - People's War

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Life on the Gainsborough Estate

by Ipswich Museum

You are browsing in:

Archive List > United Kingdom > Suffolk

Contributed by 
Ipswich Museum
People in story: 
Marhorie Smith
Location of story: 
Ipswich
Background to story: 
Civilian
Article ID: 
A3321370
Contributed on: 
24 November 2004

I can remember when my neighbour used to knock on the windows with the linen prop because sometimes I didn’t hear the air raid. Helmut Klopner and Fritz Kopitski were prisoners of war came to lunch on Sundays. We used to play darts with them on the cupboard door and made lots of holes. My husband was in the Royal signals and was away from home for 4 years.

Everyone helped each other out. I lived in a council house on Gainsborough Estate. I never remember being hungry although food was rationed. He boy Keith Peek next door injured his leg when picking up an anti personnel mine that were dropped over Ipswich.

On the radio we listened to “Ramsbottom, Enoch and Me” singing on the BBC; part of a comedy show. We weren’t very well off for clothes, we had second hand. The war was rotten; not the variety of foods. Being scared. The shelter had hard seats but we used to sing to cheer us up.

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