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15 October 2014
WW2 - People's War

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Contributed by 
BBC Southern Counties Radio
Location of story: 
Wallasey
Background to story: 
Civilian
Article ID: 
A4685664
Contributed on: 
03 August 2005

One early morning during the May Blitz when all had gone quiet and it was still dark, we noticed that there appeared to be a large red glow over Liverpool. As we lived close to the river, my mother took my brother and myself down Dalmorton Road, to the river front. The sight that met our eyes was truly unbelievable. The whole of the Liverpool waterfront from Seaforth right down to Dingle, a distance of seven to eight miles, was one solid mass of flame and most amazing of all could be seen the silhoutetttes of the Royal Liver Building, the Cunard Building and the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board all standing like sentinels. It was a sight that I shall never forget. The Germans really gave us a hammering during this May Blitz, and they must have gone back to their base in occupied Europe thinking that they had finally knocked out the Port of Liverpool.

THIS IS AN EXTRACT FROM "WALLASEY AT WAR, 1939-45", PRODUCED BY THE WALLASEY HISTORY SOCIETY. THIS ARTICLE IS WRITTEN BY B.A.THOMSON, AND WAS SUBMITTED TO THE SITE BY KEITH LEIGH,OF SEABRIGHT, WORTHING. HE WAS ONE OF THE BOYS INVOLVED IN THE STORY.

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