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WW2 - People's War

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Wellington

by Elmgrove Primary

Contributed by 
Elmgrove Primary
People in story: 
George Smyth, Margaret Symth retold by R.Bell Elmgrove Primary
Location of story: 
East Belfast
Background to story: 
Civilian
Article ID: 
A3953414
Contributed on: 
26 April 2005

Wellington

My name is George Smyth. Mother Margaret and father George senior, grandmother Emily and grandfather Wellington, called after the Duke of Wellington. Wellington was in the first world war 1 and fought at the Battle of the Somme. I was born on April 1941 at the time we knew as the blitz. One night in May the sirens went off and everyone ran as fast as they could to the shelters. My grandmother shouted at Wellington to go quickly to the shelters and he said he was not getting out of bed for them dam Germans. As my grandmother reached the air raid shelters an incintery bomb fell through their roof and landed to see Wellington holding up his nightshirt between his legs and running towards the shelter with his hand in air and shouting “those bloody Germans”

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This story has been placed in the following categories.

Air Raids and Other Bombing Category
Northern Ireland Category
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