BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page was last updated in February 2012We've left it here for reference.More information

23 August 2014
Accessibility help
Text only
WW2 - People's War

BBC Homepage
BBC History
WW2 People's War Homepage Archive List Timeline About This Site Print this page 

Contact Us

Like this page?
Send it to a friend!

 

Release from captivity:POW's in Japan

by tenacious

Contributed by 
tenacious
People in story: 
John Atwood
Location of story: 
Japan
Background to story: 
Royal Navy
Article ID: 
A2009701
Contributed on: 
10 November 2003

On September 1st 1945, after being at sea for 57 days, the destroyer on which I was serving,HMS Tenacious, came to anchor in Tokyo Bay about a mile away from the U.S.battleship Missouri on which the surrender of the Japanese was signed the next day.
Shortly afterwards, we were sent to Hammamatsu to bring back Allied prisoners of war from a large camp there.On arrival, we took on board more than a hundred ex-prisoners of war- all with close clipped hair and new American clothing. We were all truly shocked at their pitiful condition.They had been ill treated and starved by their captors.They were overjoyed to see us. We returned to Tokyo Bay at full speed and took our passengers through the cheering Fleet- a truly very emotional occasion for them and ourselves! They were taken to a hospital ship waiting for them at Yokohama.

© Copyright of content contributed to this Archive rests with the author. Find out how you can use this.

Archive List

This story has been placed in the following categories.

Royal Navy Category
Prisoners of War Category
Japan Category
icon for Story with photoStory with photo

Most of the content on this site is created by our users, who are members of the public. The views expressed are theirs and unless specifically stated are not those of the BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of any external sites referenced. In the event that you consider anything on this page to be in breach of the site's House Rules, please click here. For any other comments, please Contact Us.



About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy