bbc.co.uk
Home
Explore the BBC
This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.

19 September 2014
Accessibility help

BBC Homepage
History
Schools 

Walk Through Time
Games
TimeStrip
Which Came First
Print Outs
Teachers
Site Guide
 

Contact Us

Teachers and Parents BBChistoryFeedbackSchools
TimeStripOdd One OutWhat Came FirstPrint and DoTeachers and ParentsHome

 

In Living Memory Contributions (Page 4)

Nanny's' Memories
By Mandy, aged 7

My Nanny was born on 29th August 1931 in South Ealing, London. She lived with her Mum and Dad and Brother. She married my Grandad in June 1953, and had 3 children. The eldest was born in 1955, and the two younger in 1962 (these were twin boys one of which is my Daddy.)

I asked Nanny how she was feeling on an important day in history?

She told me that in 1945 when she was 13, after 6 years of living in terror, being bombed out and also evacuated to Cudworth, Yorkshire for about 9 months when she was 11 the war ended - this day was called V. E. day. Nanny told me that although it is very difficult to put into words she felt a mixture of relief, together with lots of other emotions that were like nothing she had ever experienced or ever felt again since.


      to top

 
The Most Exciting Day in the Life of Col.M Goodeve-Ballard
By Ryan

My Grandpa, Col.M Goodeve- Ballard was born in Carshalton, near Sutton in Surrey.

My Grandpa was an officer in the British Army for 36 years and did many jobs in that time, as he was posted every two years. During that time, he served in 5 countries. The countries were West Germany, Cyprus , Korea, Australia and, of course, Great Britain.

My Grandpa's ancestors, on both his mother and father's sides were mainly farmers although from about 1800 until 1906, quite a few BALLARDS were hotelkeepers. My Grandpa's dad's side of the family, the BALLARDS lived in Kent( Cranbrook, Sittingbourne and Ramsgate) and in Sussex (Chichester) and his mother's family, the SNELLS, lived in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, mainly around Axminster

The most exciting day in any Army officer's life is the day he takes command of soldiers for the first time. At the age of 20 ,Grandpa was commissioned as a National Service Officer and went off to Dortmund in West Germany . His very first job was to command about 35 soldiers in a troop of 4 self propelled anti- tank guns. The day he took over that troop from another young officer who was leaving the Army was a wonderful day.


to top
 
An Interview with my Granny, Mrs Miller
By Sally, class 3A

Q1: Which year were you born?
Born in 1924.

Q2: ?
Went to several primary schools went to high school for four and a half years.

Q3: Did you have a job and what was it?
Left when the war started, got a job after two or three months of leaving school. .

Q4: What was the most exciting day of your life?
My Granny's wedding day was the most exciting day of her life.

Q5: What was it like in world war Two?
World War Two was very noisy and had to go to Anderson shelter . Lived in a flat with sister and were bombed out. In gardens they had to grow vegetables instead of flowers to help with the rations . Cars had small headlights and there were no street lamps so it was very dark.


to top
 
My Grandma
By Catherine, aged 8

At the beginning of the Second World War my Grandma was 16 years old. One day she was, staying with her Granny and Grandpa when she heard a siren. This meant that people thought the Germans were going to drop gas bombs. She was very worried because she had forgotten her gas mask and started to panic. Her Grandpa said that she could borrow his mask but she thought it would be too big for her. Thankfully, the Germans never did drop any gas bombs.


 

About Living Memories

 


About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy