History

A V-1 'doodlebug' pilotless flying bomb on its launching platform, circa 1944. The background has been retouched by German censors.

V Weapons

Launched from Nazi-occupied Europe, V-1 flying bombs and V-2 supersonic missiles rained down on the south of England during 1944 and 1945, killing almost 9,000 people. These 'Vengeance Weapons' were seen by Hitler as a way of winning World War Two, and are considered the precursors to today's missile technology.


Photo: A V-1 pilotless flying bomb on its launching platform, circa 1944. The background has been retouched by German censors. (Getty Images)

Introduction

A V-1 'doodlebug' pilotless flying bomb on its launching platform, circa 1944. The background has been retouched by German censors. V Weapons

Highlights from BBC programmes Video (4)

More information about: V Weapons

V-weapons, known in the original German as Vergeltungswaffen (German: "retaliatory weapons", "reprisal weapons"), were a particular set of long range artillery weapons designed for strategic bombing during World War II, particularly terror bombing and/or aerial bombing of cities. They comprised the V-1 flying bomb, the V-2 rocket and the V-3 cannon. All of these weapons were intended for use in a military campaign against Britain, though only the V-1 and V-2 were so used in a campaign conducted 1944-5. After the invasion of Europe by the Allies, these weapons were also employed against targets on the mainland of Europe.

They were part of the range of the so-called Wunderwaffen (English: superweapons or literally 'wonderweapons') of Nazi Germany.

Read more at Wikipedia

This entry is from Wikipedia, the user-contributed encyclopedia. If you find the content in the 'About' section factually incorrect, defamatory or highly offensive you can edit this article at Wikipedia.

Who

Politicians

What

Where

Military Organisations

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.