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Air Vice Marshall Sir Trafford Leigh Mallory (centre), Commander-in-Chief of the Fighter Command, with his staff in April 1943.

RAF Fighter Command

Fighter Command was one of three functional commands – along with Bomber Command and Coastal Command – of the Royal Air Force. It was formed in 1936 to allow more specialised control of fighter aircraft.


Photo: Air Vice Marshall Sir Trafford Leigh Mallory (centre), Commander-in-Chief of Fighter Command, with his staff in April 1943. (Popperfoto/Getty Images)

Features in:

The Battle of Britain
The Battle of Britain

Highlights from BBC programmes Video (6)

More information about: RAF Fighter Command

RAF Fighter Command was one of three functional commands of the Royal Air Force. It was formed in 1936 to allow more specialised control of fighter aircraft. It served throughout the Second World War. It earned great fame during the Battle of Britain, when the Few held off the Luftwaffe attack on Britain. The Command continued until 17 November 1943, when it was disbanded. The RAF fighter force was split into two categories; defence and attack. The defensive force became Air Defence of Great Britain (ADGB) and the offensive force became the RAF Second Tactical Air Force. The Air Defence of Great Britain was later renamed Fighter Command. It was finally disbanded in 1968.

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