History

Hawker Hurricanes fly in formation. It's estimated that Hurricane pilots were credited with four-fifths of all enemy aircraft destroyed in the Battle of Britain.

Dogfight

A dogfight is a form of aerial combat between fighter aircraft at short range. Dogfighting first appeared during World War One, but its most famous instance is probably the Battle of Britain during World War Two.


Photo: Hawker Hurricanes fly in formation. It's estimated that Hurricane pilots were credited with four-fifths of all enemy aircraft destroyed in the Battle of Britain. (Popperfoto/Getty Images)

Features in:

The Battle of Britain
The Battle of Britain

Introduction

Hawker Hurricanes fly in formation. It's estimated that Hurricane pilots were credited with four-fifths of all enemy aircraft destroyed in the Battle of Britain. Dogfight

Highlights from BBC programmes Video (10)

More information about: Dogfight

A dogfight, or dog fight, is a form of engagement between fighter aircraft; in particular, combat of maneuver at short range, where each side is aware of the other's presence. Dogfighting first appeared during World War I, shortly after the invention of the airplane. Until at least 1992, it was a component in every major war, despite beliefs after World War II that increasingly greater speeds and longer range weapons would make dogfighting obsolete. Modern terminology for air-to-air combat is air combat maneuvering (ACM), which refers to tactical situations requiring the use of individual basic fighter maneuvers (BFM) to attack or evade one or more opponents. This differs from aerial warfare, which deals with the strategy involved in planning and executing various missions.

Read more at Wikipedia

This entry is from Wikipedia, the user-contributed encyclopedia. If you find the content in the 'About' section factually incorrect, defamatory or highly offensive you can edit this article at Wikipedia.

Who

What

Speeches

Military Technology

Military Organisations

Where

Military airfields

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.