How can I stop snoring?

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1. Tortured ears

Do you find it hard to get a good night's sleep because there is someone snoring beside you? With around a quarter of the British population snorting or wheezing in their sleep, many of us face this nightly torture.

The reasons why we snore are pretty straightforward. When you fall asleep the muscles in your neck and throat relax. They then go floppy and the airways narrow, meaning there is less space for the air to go through. The soft tissue in this smaller space vibrates and rattles as the air passes through.

There is a kinder – and more effective – solution than kicking the person next to you though. Trust Me, I'm a Doctor is on hand to show you a secret that could help your sleep to become more peaceful – strengthening your throat.

2. WATCH: Strengthen your throat

Watch Dr Michael Mosley demonstrate some simple throat strengthening exercises. You should perform the complete set three times per day. It is worth it – people who did the exercises snored 36% less often and their snoring reduced in power by 59%.

These simple exercises could lead to a more peaceful nights sleep!

3. INTERACTIVE: Snoring cures

But there are other a number of other things you can try to become a quieter sleeper. Click or tap on our interactive to get for more tips.

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BBC iWonder content is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or other health care professional. Always consult your own GP if you are in any way concerned about your health.

4. Snoring myths

There are a number of myths around snoring. Is there any truth behind them?

Women do not snore

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INCORRECT

Women DO snore. However, men are twice as likely to snore as women.

Snoring is harmless

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INCORRECT

Snoring affects both the snorer and those around them. A lack of sleep can cause excessive daytime sleepiness, dangerous if driving or operating machinery.

Snoring is unstoppable

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INCORRECT

This guide has shown you lots of potential solutions you can try. And you can visit your GP for further advice and treatment.