How can I protect my camera in extreme weather conditions?

Open navigator

1. Introduction

Filming in extreme weather conditions can be exciting for you but hazardous for your camera.

We explain what to look out for when faced with extreme heat, cold, moisture or dust. Discover what can happen to your camera - and how to prevent problems.

2. What do I need to consider?

In this video, adventure film-maker Ash Bhardwaj shares what you need to anticipate when using your camera in extreme environments. You'll also discover what weather conditions and damage BBC camera operators have confronted while on shoots.

3. What damage can occur?

Learn about types of damage that can occur to your camera in extreme weather conditions.

This content uses functionality that is not supported by your current browser. Consider upgrading your browser.

4. How can I protect my camera?

Tips to keep your camera safe when filming in extreme weather conditions.

This content uses functionality that is not supported by your current browser. Consider upgrading your browser.

Click on the image labels to discover tips that will help keep your camera safe when filming in extreme weather conditions.

5. Final things to remember?

From high-budget drama to no-budget documentaries, extreme weather conditions can arise almost anywhere. Keep these tips in mind when taking your camera to the unpredictable outdoors.

Smoke contains fine particles which can not only make your lens dirty but stick to components inside the camera.

Snowflakes melting on to your camera can cause condensation, which can re-freeze and damage the electronics when going back into the cold.

Even if the weather report promises clear skies, remember to always take a rain cover for your camera if there is even a tiny chance it could rain.

The inside of your camera can get hotter than the outside temperature, so keep heat-generating functions like batteries and the LCD screen to a minimum in hot environments.

Ash from volcanoes or fires can get into ports or openings and prevent cables from connecting or memory cards from working.

Fog and mist can condense into damaging water droplets when you take your camera from a cool to a warm environment. Use cleaning cloths constantly while filming, and silica packets when it’s in the bag.

When in a humid environment be aware of the Dew Point Temperature (the temperature at which water vapour in the air condenses) and store your camera at or above that temperature.

Dust storms can suddenly arise in dry areas, so be prepared with cleaning brushes and lens protectors.