Remembrance Day 2014: How will we remember them?

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1. 100 years on

The First World War may no longer be living history but it remains an important part of our past to which many of us still feel a close connection. Each year people wear the poppy, attend remembrance services and pause for the two minutes’ silence, commemorations all originally created to mark the conflict of 1914-1918.

As part of the WW1 centenary season, BBC Local Radio commissioned an artwork to capture the spirit of collective commemoration one hundred years on. Featuring over 30,000 faces from across the UK alongside the portraits of men and women who lived through the conflict 100 years ago, this is an image of remembrance for a new century.

2. A nation remembers

This year the BBC has taken its World War One At Home tour to 25 locations across the UK. Over 20,000 people entered our recruiting offices and posed for their photograph as part of the commemorative artwork.

The BBC World War One At Home tour took place all across the UK, including Manchester, Woolwich, Ipswich, Yorkshire and more.

Many of the thousands who attended were put through their paces on the outdoor parade grounds, learning the same drills as a WW1 soldier.

The events highlighted the local history of life of the areas visited. Visitors could enjoy talks and exhibits to get an insight into life on the home front during the war.

Visitors could get their hands on WW1 kit, including field telephones and radio equipment, with the help of the The Royals Signals Museum.

People were encouraged to have their photograph taken in special recruitment offices for the commemorative artwork.

Once inside, participants sat for their portrait like people a century earlier, who had their photograph taken before heading off to war.

Visitors could take away an ID card as a record of their experience.

3. Creating a picture of remembrance

Next came the task of assembling the photographs into the finished artwork. Alongside audience portraits and submissions, the artwork also features original First World War photographs sourced from the collections of the Imperial War Museums.

4. The Face of WW1

Explore the faces of commemoration this centenary year, starting with Private James Beaney, a plumber's mate from Putney who signed up in 1914 but died at the Somme in 1916.

5. Representing the many

How can one memorial communicate loss of life on such a huge scale?

The Cenotaph

Image: Getty Images

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The Cenotaph

An empty tomb designed in 1919 to represent all those who died in service during the war. It was quickly adopted as a national site of mourning.

Tomb of The Unknown Warrior

Image: Getty Images

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Tomb of The Unknown Warrior

Getty Images

The first monument of its kind. In 1920 an unidentified soldier received a state burial. Millions could imagine that it was their son in Westminster Abbey.

Tower of London Remembers

Image: Historic Royal Palaces

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Tower of London Remembers

The 888,246 ceramic poppies represent the British and Commonwealth war dead and make the devastating loss of life visible for a new generation.