How do I keep my brain young?

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1. Staying sharp

Keeping our bodies in good condition is straightforward, in theory. You just need to stick to a healthy diet and take plenty of exercise.

While the same basic principles should help to keep your brain healthy too, scientific research is also revealing secrets about other ways to keep you mentally sharp for longer.

So just how do you keep your grey matter in great shape?

2. Get your brain active

It's essential to get your brain working. But doing bit of reading or tackling the crossword isn't enough on its own. Getting out there and learning new skills can make a huge difference. Click or tap to learn more.

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3. Brain food

Eating the right foods can also play a key part in keeping our brains young.

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4. Medical advances

What does cutting-edge science have in store for the brain in the future?

Young blood...

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...could improve memory

The memories of old mice improved when injected with the blood of young mice. Trials are currently underway on humans.

A zapping...

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...could stimulate your brain

A small electric charge applied to the scalp seems to strengthen the connections between brain cells, according to research by the US Air Force.

Brain implants...

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...could fight dementia

Researchers in the USA are working on a brain implant that could help people with dementia form new memories.

5. Social creatures

Ultimately, human beings are a social species – we need each other to survive in a very real way.

Social activity stimulates your brain in a similar way to activities like reading and doing crosswords.

Just like learning new skills or being physically active, it helps to develop connections between the nerve cells in different areas of the brain.

And research also suggests that people who are lonely are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

When it comes to the brain, a rich and varied life is the key to long-term health.