BBC navigation

BBC

Cod recipes

Fish and chips

Fish and chips

By Jo' Pratt

Cod is a key member of a whole family of fish including haddock, coley, pollack, whiting, ling and hake. All the related fish in this group are sea fish of varying sizes and share similar characteristics such as low-fat white flesh. Our love of eating cod has meant that stocks have suffered greatly from over-fishing. Some stocks of Atlantic cod from Iceland, the North East Arctic and Eastern Baltic are considered sustainable, as well as Pacific cod caught in Alaskan waters via longline. To help reserve cod stocks, we’re encouraged to eat a greater range of white fish, such as the sustainable pollack, pouting (bib) or coley. And if you do eat cod, ensure it is clearly labelled as coming from a properly managed, sustainable fishery (ie. with the MSC blue tick).

Buyer's guide

Most often sold as fillets and loins, cod is also available whole and headless, cold-smoked, dried or salted.

Preparation

Fresh cod is incredibly versatile. Skin or pin-bone fillets either before or after cooking. The flaky flesh flesh works well poached, baked, fried or grilled and it also complements rich sauces. Cod is the most popular fish for fish and chips, but is also excellent in fishcakes, fish pies, tempura and chowder.

Article by CJ Jackson

On this page

Quick recipe finder

Type the ingredients you want to use, then click Go. For better results you can use quotation marks around phrases (e.g. "chicken breast"). Alternatively you can search by chef, programme, cuisine, diet, or dish (e.g. Lasagne).

Advanced search options

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.