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New Town Killers: Richard Jobson interview

New Town Killers: Richard Jobson interview

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The director discusses how his anti-establishment views inform his timely thriller about a psychopathic banker.

The director discusses how his anti-establishment views inform his timely thriller about bankers on a murderous rampage.

Scotsman Richard Jobson has been a punk musician, a model and a film critic, but found his true calling behind the camera. He wrote and directed Sixteen Years of Alcohol, an intense semi-autobiographical drama that was released to much acclaim in 2003 and earned him a BIFA for Best Directorial Debut.

Jobson went on to make two more films in as many years, avoiding the pitfalls that see many new filmmakers brushed to the wayside after initial success. This may be because Jobson is fiercely independent, tackling subjects that aren't obviously commercial and funding them on modest budgets. His latest, New Town Killers, is his most accessible film to date but was still made for relatively little money.

Dougray Scott as pyschopathic banker Alistair Raskolnikov.

Dougray Scott as pyschopathic banker Alistair Raskolnikov.

In this visceral chase thriller Dougray Scott plays a bloodthirsty banker who pursues a teenager from a deprived housing estate (James Anthony Pearson) just for kicks. According to Jobson, the story also highlights the widening gulf between the haves and have-nots in the city of Edinburgh, describing his young hero as someone who is "not part of the success story of modern Britain" and who has "no connection with society or community".

Talking to BBC Film Network, the filmmaker appears to identify with this character, describing himself as an outsider, certainly when it comes to the British film industry. From his anti-establishment view, he also tells us why shooting on film is futile and how they managed to pull off it's stunt work and special effects.

New Town Killers is now on general release in the UK.

Interview: Stella Papamichael; Video: Stephen Bailey Published 16th June 09

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