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Exam: interviews

Exam: interviews

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An interview with Stuart Hazeldine, director of British thriller Exam, plus the film's stars Jimi Mistry and Luke Mably.

An interview with Stuart Hazeldine, director of British thriller Exam, plus the film's stars Jimi Mistry and Luke Mably.

Surrey native Stuart Hazeldine was quietly carving out a writing career in Hollywood when he decided that making his own low-budget feature would be infinitely more rewarding. The result is Exam, a thriller set entirely inside one room starring Jimi Mistry and up-and-comer Luke Mably as two of eight high-flying candidates invited for an unorthodox job interview.

With the candidates subjected to a brutal process of elimination, the film plays like a twisted reality game-show. Mistry has described it as "The Apprentice on acid".

On the face of it, making a film inside one room sounds like an easily manageable task for an inexperienced director. However, this set-up presented its own unique challenges and these were in some ways more daunting than a traditional shoot across multiple locations.

The thirty-nine-year-old Hazeldine tells us how he strove to make the action dynamic and cinematic within relatively small confines and why keeping the actors sane was made doubly difficult. He also explains how he took inspiration from the likes of Sidney Lumet whose nail-biting 1957 thriller Twelve Angry Men was based inside a jury chamber.

Mistry and Mably go into more detail about the testing experience of being trapped inside a windowless interview room for weeks on end and how Hazeldine kept them on balance.

Interviews by Stella Papamichael; editing by Ravi Ajit Chopra.

Exam is released nationwide on Friday 8th January 2009.

Click here for an interview with Stuart Hazeldine about being a Skillset Trailblazer in 2009

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