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Description

The girls are enjoying a girls party. Monica, aged 11, and Lara, aged 12, are having great fun, but Akira, also 12, just doesn't seem her usual happy self. Not wanting to miss out on all of the fun, Tony and Gabriel decide to crash the party. As the boys join the party it becomes clear that there is something up with Akira, she's being grumpy and makes fun of Gabriel for going red whenever he is embarrassed or nervous. Trying to calm the situation Monica suggests that they play a game of "Secret, secrets", so the gang all sit down to play the game. After having a few laughs, Gabriel admits he hates that he blushes so much, and that he always thinks people laugh at him when he does. At this revelation, Akira bursts into tears and runs to the bathroom. Akira feels terrible about making fun of Gabriel. Lara and Monica recognise that Akira's emotions are all over the place, and explain that perhaps it's because she is getting her period. They explain that her moodiness is just down to PMS (premenstrual syndrome), and not because she's a bad person. As Lara and Monica speak with Akira, Tony and Gabriel have a heart to heart conversation. Tony is able to cheer up Gabriel which makes him relax about his blushing problem. The party ends on a happy note.
This clip is from:
Girls Only Party
First broadcast:
16 May 2012

Classroom Ideas

This clip can be used to introduce discussions about premenstrual syndrome. It's designed to be accessible to as broad a group as possible. It is also a useful tool to assess the level of current knowledge of menstruation and PMS in a mixed gender class. The audience will ideally already have a basic understanding of what PMS and periods are as the storyline does not explain the biological facts, as with all episodes the emphasis is on the emotional side of puberty and growing up. Teachers are advised to consult your school's policy on PSHE (sex) education to determine suitability and whether parental consent is required. Within these clips it poses questions to the listener to get the children to interact with the clip by answering them. Pupils could be asked "have you ever felt like Akira? What do you think is wrong with her? What do you do when you’re in a mood? What gets in you into a mood and what gets you out of moods? What do you think you shouldn’t do to a friend that is in a mood? What could you do to be a good friend and support someone who might be in a mood?" Talk to the children about trying to see the bigger picture before responding straight away and be understanding even if others are mean.