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Description

Whilst excitedly planning a trip to the cinema, everyone notices that Lara, aged 12, is a little out of sorts – acting very subdued and choosing a silly slapstick film over her usual preference, a more serious, sad one. Lara talks to her mum and explains that she is feeling homesick but she doesn't feel that she can confide in her friends in case they think she is being silly. The teacher asks the class to write about a time that they felt sad. Lara tries to explain her feelings to Akira, but finds it difficult to get through to her friend. On receiving a sentimental package from her mum, Lara has an emotional outburst and snaps at Monica, running away to hide her tears. She reluctantly decides to make an appointment with the school counsellor, but is unable to get an appointment until the next day. Meanwhile, her friends are shocked at her outburst, but eventually understand the situation – she is homesick. They decide she needs to talk about it, and unaware of Lara’s own intentions, hatch a plan to get her to see the school counsellor. Unfortunately, the friends' elaborate plans go wrong, and they end up scaring Lara away. Eventually Tony decides just to listen to what she has to say. Lara feels better after their heart to heart conversation and the two head off to the cinema to join the others - to see the film Lara really wanted to see. They all cry at the movie together, realising that it's healthy to share your feelings with your friends.
This clip is from:
Looking After Lara
First broadcast:
16 May 2012

Classroom Ideas

This clip could be used to generate discussion about feelings and the range of people available for support. It could be used to highlight the importance of communication and to underline how emotional well-being is as important as good physical health. Children could hot seat the characters in the clip and share ideas about why they felt or acted as they did. Children could respond to each of the questions during the clip, possibly on whiteboards, privately or in small discussion groups.