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Description

Can be used to explore the significance of the novel's first big turning point, Elizabeth’s rejection of Darcy in chapter 34. Students can prepare for this by recalling what each character feels and wants at the beginning of the scene: what conflicts are they experiencing (eg personal pride v desire, independent will v social convention)? They can then watch and note down what the characters say and what they feel, capturing both reasons given and, if they are different, reasons hidden. They should also note the structure of the scene and the stages in which the reasons are unfolded. At the end, students should assess the wisdom of each character with one group speaking up for Darcy (he is harshly treated and she is rash) and the other for Elizabeth (she is right and heroic). Finally, students should place the scene against the novel’s social context: what is Elizabeth risking here?
First broadcast:
16 February 2008

Classroom Ideas

Can be used to explore the significance of the novels first big turning point, Elizabeth’s rejection of Darcy in chapter 34. Students can prepare for this by recalling what each character feels and wants at the beginning of the scene: what conflicts are they experiencing (eg personal pride v desire, independent will v social convention)? They can then watch and note down what the characters say and what they feel, capturing both reasons given and, if they are different, reasons hidden. They should also note the structure of the scene and the stages in which the reasons are unfolded. At the end, students should assess the wisdom of each character with one group speaking up for Darcy (he is harshly treated and she is rash) and the other for Elizabeth (she is right and heroic). Finally, students should place the scene against the novel’s social context: what is Elizabeth risking here?

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