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The Guide to Life, The Universe and Everything.

1. Life / Biology / Human Anatomy
3. Everything / Maths, Science & Technology / Biology / Human Anatomy

Created: 30th March 2000
The Anatomical Snuff Box
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There's a bit of the body for everything and the anatomical snuff box is a truly wonderful piece of anatomy for medical students because it has such a descriptive name that it's dead easy to remember. It refers to the depressed area between the tendons on the outside of the thumb (if you hold your thumb back like a hitchhiker you'll see it). It gets its name, as you can probably imagine, because it's the right size and shape to hold a reasonable dose of snuff. Obviously it's rather less used for that purpose now, but one thing it is still used for is for holding the salt while doing tequila slammers. Which is why medical students remember it so easily.



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ENTRY DATA
Written and Researched by:

Binky the Doormat

Edited by:

Ashley

Referenced Entries:

Tequila



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