DEVON NEEDS A FLAG(permalink)

Posted by Devon Editor on Wednesday, 7th May 2003

This page includes information about the designs submitted for a Devon flag. The voting is now complete and the flag has gone into production. For the latest information visit Devon's new flag page - where you can read all the debate and comments about the Devon flag.

YOU'VE BEEN VOTING FOR YOUR FAVOURITE DESIGN

Which of the following designs would you choose to represent Devon?

The results are in - see which design came out on top in our "just for fun" poll. CLICK HERE FOR RESULTS

The vote is purely fun and the result does not purport to represent public opinion as a whole.

One of our contributors - Devonian - started the debate and now he has sent us two possible suggestions for a flag.

Plain CrossCross with coat of arms

Plymouth Exile writes: I quite like the idea of the black rimmed white cross on a green background, but on its own, it looks a bit too anonymous. I prefer the design with the Devon Coat of Arms, but it looks slightly too cluttered and official (or ceremonial). I have therefore experimented by adding the basic Devon Shield to the cross. Any comments?

Cross with shield design from Plymouth Exile

Ozzie Exile writes: I like the three designs posted so far, but as these are all on a similar scheme I thought a couple of alternate designs may be worth posting.

Flag design from Ozzie ExileFlag design from Ozzie Exile

Plymouth Exile writes: Taking into account the various comments, I have now refined my flag design to make it more appropriate to Devon.

The colours are the Devon Colours, Green, White and Black. The design is in the form of a Celtic Cross in recognition of Devon's Celtic Heritage and its (unofficial) Celtic Patron Saint - St. Petrock.

The Devon Shield represents both Devon's Illustrious Maritime History, and its Allegiance to the Crown.

Flag design from Plymouth Exile

More ideas are coming thick and fast. This new design has been sent in by Coref.

Flag design from Coref

Estren writes "After looking at your proposals of a flag, some thoughts came to my mind:

  1. If black is the third colour of Devon, then it could be included a bit more "offensive"
  2. If have NO idea where the red lion in the CoA is derived from, but in my opinion it seems a little bit "Saxon" - the Celtic thing would be more dragonlike, I assume
  3. I favoured the cross version most, the tricolor is a little bit boring and expresses nothing then colours next to each other. The circle-centered cross of "Plymouth exile" is in my eyes a little bit to close to the celtic cross symbol of right-wings, so I wouldn't appreciate it.

I send you two of my proposals, along with an idea of a "Pendragon" flag: well, the dragon is Welsh, but who's got more right to claim the red dragon to carry it in their flag: the Dumnonians or the Welsh???

Flag design from Estren

A second design from Estren

And the third choice of Estren, the Pendragon

Here's another contender - this one comes from Robert Kerswell who writes:

"I thought I would try to throw one more suggested design into the pot. I tried to capture a simple design with a celtic influence, whilst keeping to the green, black and white.

"I don't have very good design capabilities (at either end of the keyboard)but I thought this would demonstrate the idea at least."

Could this be the winning design?

And another offering comes from Barumite in Bristol who offers up the following: "Please find attached my contribution to the Devon flag debate. I have focussed on key elements of the natural Devon. The sea, the moors, the beaches and the red Devon soil. Each representative colour being placed in a 'rolling hill' style frame.

"In doing this I have, I think, managed to create something that will be recognised by all Devonians and not have elements that might cause offence to some in this modern, multicultural age.

A rolling hills design from Barumite in Bristol

"As requested here is the revised design submitted by Barumite following your recent discussions.

Barumite's revised design

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