Discuss

Is Dewi so hard to say?

  • Dinkydo on Saturday, 16th December 2006

    Just an honest question,we've heard Dowie...Duwie...is Dewi so difficult?It's not Llanfair....... for gawds sake?

  • Message 2. Posted by unicyclops on Saturday, 16th December 2006 permalink

    It's just 'uncool' for the English commentators to be able to pronounce welsh words and names, after all it's quite easy given time and patience to teach even 'Mr. England' Stuart Barnes how to say 'Llanethli', even if he does find it easier to say Dostoyevshilivy.

  • Message 3. Posted by pickeringforthembe on Saturday, 16th December 2006 permalink

    This post has been removed.

  • Message 4. Posted by kolkol99 on Saturday, 16th December 2006 permalink

    I lived in england for ten years my first name is alun the first year was spent telling them I was alun not alan the second year was spent ignoring anyone who called me alan they then made up a nickname and that was that now can any englishmen here tell me how difficult it is to prounce alun rembering that u is pronouced as an i it is pure ignorance on the english all you have to listen to traffic reports and how the reporter would mis-pronounce even the simplist of welsh place names
    sorry about this rant but (and I have many good english friends) as far as this is concerned they really are the most ignorant bunch of people

  • Message 5. Posted by arightleftwinger on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Well being born and brought up in Torquay (of English Irish, Scottish and Welsh grandparents so make your own mind up where my allegiances lie) It's always amazed me how badly people pronounce Newton Abbot. I mean it's not hard to drop the first vowel is it? And the number of people who fail to pronounce Crediton as Curdon is astonishing. Still, the English and Foreign Languages eh? smiley - smiley

    Oh, and the "R" is pronounced as if you're trying to swallow your tongue smiley - smiley

  • Message 6. Posted by kolkol99 on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    I pronouced the R as you said and almost killed myself

  • Message 7. Posted by Nick on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    It's never easy for people to understand dialects and pronounciation in the same language. People from Wales forget too easily that us Sais have been taught to talk using different sounds so what may be easy for the average Welsh bloke can be hard work for the average English guy. The same works from regional differences in England and possibly in Wales too as there must be some differences with word sounds from North Wales to South Wales??

  • Message 8. Posted by Dave on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    watching the blues game yesterday the commentator (?who - some irish fella) kept calling deiniol jones "denny". Did my head in!

  • Message 9. Posted by wildthornyrose on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    The North Wales accent is awful, most people can't understand them when they speak English and their fellow Welshmen from the south can't understand them when they speak Welsh!! Saying that, I'm from the South of England (the good bit!) married to a Northener and living in West Wales so I'm so confused I have to talk to the cat!

  • Message 10. Posted by englishdog on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    married to a Northener and living in West Wales so I'm so confused I have to talk to the cat!


    You will probably get more sense out of the cat than any women!
    Women....put on this planet to make a mans life miserable!
    I have just fell out with my "Old Crow" so I'm on a bit of a downer where women are cocerned!smiley - steam

  • Message 11. Posted by Rick S on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Surely it's Cur'on, isn't it? Otherwise Tiverton looks very wrong if you write it down!

    Going back to the original point, the reason people don't pronounce things as they should be pronounced in their original language is that it sounds silly to jump about from one accent to another. Newsreaders and TV presenters don't say Pahree, Rrrroma or Nürnberg. Commentators don't roll their tongues when Bortolami or Bergamasco have the ball. Eddie Butler always sounds pretentious when he uses the correct Spanish for Mark Cwetto, rather than pronouncing it Kowayto like everybody else does. Likewise French newsreaders don't say "London" in an English accent but stick to "Londres".

    So it's not a matter of ignorance, it's a matter of being consistent in pronunciation when you're speaking a particular language. If I was asking a Frenchman the way to Reims, I'd say it in French using the French pronunciation (although I'd probably choke to death in the attempt); if I was telling someone in England about the place, I'd use the English version.

  • Message 12. Posted by Dinkydo on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Back again.......got the answer!!Rope in Jonathan Woss and tell him to explain to the Beeb and Sky lot his name is Derry Morris...Voila!!!Sorry 'bout the rant..was just pi$$ed after watching the Blues.Oh dear!Anyway Mewwy Chwistmas to all and hoping for better stuff in the New Year

  • Message 13. Posted by Rick S on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Don't think it's your day, englishdog... wildthornyrose IS a woman! smiley - doh

  • Message 14. Posted by bluesbestreturns on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    exactly North Wales talk gobbledy gook. Like being sick. Thank god I was born in CARDIFF. Wales is OK down south but up north they are either Liverpool or rubbish mouthes.

  • Message 15. Posted by Rick S on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Back again.......got the answer!!Rope in Jonathan Woss and tell him to explain to the Beeb and Sky lot his name is Derry Morris...Voila!!!


    smiley - laugh

    When I said "original point", I was actually responding more to kokol99's accusations of English ignorance than anything else - but I didn't express it very clearly!

  • Message 16. Posted by brian! on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    I don`t think any disrespect is intended.
    You can pronounce a word/place in many ways, such is the confusion of any language.

  • Message 17. Posted by Mervatron on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    I'm sorry. I'm from the north and can understand everyone perfectly fine. I've had the same problem with my name with regards to english people.

    Im Myfyr but have yet to meet one person in england who can say my name properly however many times i say it so i have to just say call me merv cause the english version of Myfyr is Myvher and it sounds awful.

  • Message 18. Posted by englishdog on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Don't think it's your day, englishdog... wildthornyrose IS a woman!


    Bloody hell! I'm all ready in the dog house with one women! smiley - yikes
    Sod it, I'm off up the the pub. smiley - biggrin

  • Message 19. Posted by wicket76 on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Rick S, I kind of agree, but big cities tend to have anglicised versions of their name, so pronouncing them as such is not really a faux pas. (Pronounced fow pa)

    It is fine to pronounce Cardiff and Swansea in an English way as these are the recognised names for them in English. We don't expect you to say the Welsh, abertawe, or "Wenglish" Kaiirdiff.

    But LLanelli does not have an anglicised version of its name. Therefore pronouncing it "Lannelly" just sounds stupid.

    Having said that, I am not very practiced in gutterall sounds and I have to try hard for it not to sound different everytime I say it!

  • Message 20. Posted by tovarishch on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    RickS, I agree entirely andd have no problem with anglicised pronounciations of place names but I do of people's names. Having said that, I use a different pronounciation for all proper names in Russian than in English. Not many English have heard of Hrushshov! (Khrushchev)

  • Message 21. Posted by Rick S on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Reminds me of many, many years ago, when I was at a London Welsh game with a mate from my school, and we were laughing about another kid who DID pronounce it "Llanelly". Of course a Welshman behind us got completely the wrong idea and thought WE were the ones who couldn't say it properly!

  • Message 22. Posted by pareejack on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Hello there in "kholodnaya maskva"; Not much rugby,I suppose. A bit bored waiting for Sale/sf match in 45 mins so shall ask you,a learned philologist,why you do not write your name "tavarischtch" as the unaccentuated first syllable "o" becomes "a". I hope all "fparyatky" (is OK)

  • Message 23. Posted by kolkol99 on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    When I said "original point", I was actually responding more to kokol99's accusations of English ignorance than anything else - but I didn't express it very clearly!

    what got my back up is that i used to correct them when they called me alan its not difficult to pronounce the u in alun as an i after all to me alan is a different name than alun so they might as well called me nigel or fred rather than alan

  • Message 24. Posted by tovarishch on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Hello there in "kholodnaya maskva"; Not much rugby,I suppose. A bit bored waiting for Sale/sf match in 45 mins so shall ask you,a learned philologist,why you do not write your name "tavarischtch" as the unaccentuated first syllable "o" becomes "a". I hope all "fparyatky" (is OK)


    ISO transcription doesn't take account of pronounciation because of variations in local accents. The unaccented o becoming a is Moscow dialect although with tovarishch it is nearer a u than an a because it is 'national'word. Similarly g as in Luftgansa (I hate that word) is nearer to h in the south (thus Lufthansa) but it is always transctibed a g.

    Moscow is actually teplo at the moment - 9 degs but we do have a break from Rugby until the ground is no longer frozen and the New Year hangovers clear up! And fsyo v pariadki!

  • Message 25. Posted by Rick S on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Fair enough kk - I would always try to find out how somebody wants their name to be spoken. Having said that, we had a Welsh guy in my office called Alun and he didn't seem to mind how it was pronounced (then again, maybe he did really and is posting about it on this MB now!).

  • Message 26. Posted by wildthornyrose on Sunday, 17th December 2006 permalink

    Hello English dog.Thorny here, sorry you're having a bad time with "er indoors" but as you probably now realise I'm one of the fairer sex as well so hard luck!!The cats female as well, very clever she is too. Cheer up we're not so bad when you learn how to handle us..smiley - hug

  • Message 27. Posted by Mephistopheles on Monday, 18th December 2006 permalink

    It's Dewi not Dawi. It's actually very easy to say, even for an ignorant englishman.

  • Message 28. Posted by wicket76 on Monday, 18th December 2006 permalink

    I always thought it was Dewi.

    But when I started watching Sky Sports I began worrying that it was me that was pronouncing it wrong!

  • Message 29. Posted by wildthornyrose on Monday, 18th December 2006 permalink

    Shouldn't have such silly names then there wouldn't be a problem smiley - winkeye

  • Message 30. Posted by wicket76 on Monday, 18th December 2006 permalink

    Sorry wild n' horny rose, I apologise on behalf of the Welsh nation.

  • Message 31. Posted by wildthornyrose on Monday, 18th December 2006 permalink

    apology accepted thankyou wicket.smiley - peacedove

  • Message 32. Posted by wicket76 on Monday, 18th December 2006 permalink

    Dewi....... it's hard!


    smiley - laugh

  • Message 33. Posted by arightleftwinger on Monday, 18th December 2006 permalink

    I pronouced the R as you said and almost killed myself

    Arrr? Proper job!

  • Message 34. Posted by arightleftwinger on Monday, 18th December 2006 permalink

    It's never easy for people to understand dialects and pronounciation in the same language. People from Wales forget too easily that us Sais have been taught to talk using different sounds so what may be easy for the average Welsh bloke can be hard work for the average English guy. The same works from regional differences in England and possibly in Wales too as there must be some differences with word sounds from North Wales to South Wales??


    Some bright (academic) spark once went and counted 14 different regional accents (with some dialectical differences) between Brixham and Torquay. That's about 8 and a half miles round the coast from each other. Less by boat, which is mostly how we used to get from one to the other. Even Newton Abbot speak differently and they're only 7 miles away. But then that's the difference between farmers and fishermen (or used to be Pre Harold Wilson).

  • Message 35. Posted by arightleftwinger on Monday, 18th December 2006 permalink

    Surely it's Cur'on, isn't it?
    the ' represents a glottal stop which, in my experience, isn't really part of the South Devon dialect. The 'd' isn't a hard d though (like the French T compared to the English one), almost not spoken, perhaps closer to a t than a d. But then you'll probably find about 400 variations of the pronounciation along the South Devon coast alone smiley - smiley

    Devon - the only County with a North and South coast, but no East or West one smiley - smiley

  • Message 36. Posted by Rick S on Monday, 18th December 2006 permalink

    I thought it was a kind of glottal stop, although not like the Sarf Lunnon one (e.g. "that's my daugh'ah"). I'm genuinely interested because I believe my own surname is derived from another similar compression of a West Country village name (although I won't say what it is for fear giving away too much personal information!).

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