You & Yours: Prostate Cancer Diaries  permalink

Does men's health take a back seat?

This discussion has been closed.

Messages: 1 - 7 of 7
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Skylark (struggling to be more blythe and spirited) (U6629883) on Wednesday, 17th June 2009

    According to Cancer Research UK, men are 40 per cent more likely to die of some form of cancer than women, and 16 per cent more likely to get the disease in the first place. If gender-specific forms of cancer are excluded.... Men are almost 60 per cent more likely than women to get cancer and 70 per cent more likely to die from it.

    Terence Blacker, writing in The Independent, continues : " Men with prostate cancer have 'consistently reported a worse experience of NHS care than patients with other common cancers and our new research indicates that this legacy continues,' according to a recent statement from the Prostate Cancer Charity. To a certain extent, this bias reflects who we are. Female values may be extolled in politics and business but, in the life we all live, it is the shucks-it's-only-scratch Clint Eastwood model of masculinity that commands respect and desire. That cliché of sitcom world, the male weakling who frets about his health, is funny because it accords to our own evolutionary bias.

    "It is too easy and too lazy to explain away the terrible imbalance between the health of men and women in terms of male slobbishness, and it is socially irresponsible to prattle pointlessly about lifestyle choices. Rather than delivering a general scold, government might introduce practical measures to help the situation and save lives. "

    www.independent.co.u...

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Princess Anne (U7991547) on Thursday, 18th June 2009

    You've just copied those three paragraphs out of the newspaper, yet haven't given any indication as to what you might think about the situation. Personnally i think the perception that men can look after themselves any more than women doesn't hold true in reality, most wives and doctors don't (in my experience) discriminate the sexs, and i know plenty of blokes who spend plenty of time a the doctors. In fact historically its women who walk the furthest carrying the most. I might have missed the point here. But i will repeat this, "The true expression of a 'man' is, life insurance", Charles Ives.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Skylark (struggling to be more blythe and spirited) (U6629883) on Thursday, 18th June 2009

    U101

    Thanks for your reply. I really wanted to find out what other people's views are on this; the idea that men's chances of surviving cancer are so much lower than women's is a cause for concern.

    I am not a man, or a doctor, so won't try to guess what has caused this apparent imbalance. No matter what the reasons, the disparity needs to be looked at and addressed.

    Perhaps there needs to be a Men's Movement or - dare I mention this here? - a Man' Hour.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by anna - HOST (U2219604) on Friday, 19th June 2009

    I think from what I have read elsewhere, it's because girls and women go very regularly to the doctor's throughout their lives and so ailments get picked up earlier.

    A

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Skylark (struggling to be more blythe and spirited) (U6629883) on Friday, 19th June 2009

    Anna, that may well be the case, if so is there a case for a regular screening programme for men, harnessed to wide publicity to encourage men to actually go?

    A year or so ago Radio 4 broadcast an item about a couple, each diagnosed with cancer at roughly the same time. The woman had breast cancer, the man testicular or prostate cancer (I can't rememer which) and they reported their different experiences in the NHS; she was seen at once and got immediate treatment, he had to wait some time.

    According to the article in the opening post: "Men with prostate cancer have 'consistently reported a worse experience of NHS care than patients with other common cancers and our new research indicates that this legacy continues,' according to a recent statement from the Prostate Cancer Charity.

    Now, this may not be true, but if so, I do wonder if the superior treatment for breast cancer patients is due to hugely successful campaigning by women's groups. If so, perhaps men could get organised too!

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Poppy55 (U10228702) on Friday, 19th June 2009

    <>

    I think there is not point to argue about if men take care more or less than women.

    The point is please go to the doctor to have checks periodically (women, men, everybody).

    I wonder if the statistics are correct, there is a relation with cultural groups to tackle the problem. For example with my parents (in latinoamerica), it is my mother that always goes to the doctor and my father never does (they are around 75 y o). And since I remember, there are similarities with the neighbourhood.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Principled (U8899543) on Sunday, 21st June 2009

    Skytlark 49er
    Perhaps there needs to be a Men's Movement or - dare I mention this here? - a Man' Hour. 

    It was while decorating some years ago and hearing prostate cancer discussed on Woman's Hour, that I realised how men had done themselves a disservice by not being more vocal (like the women's lib movement of the 70s which certainly sharpened politicians' focus on female issues if nothing else). I subsequently wrote to the BBC about a possible Mans' Hour. Some time later they produced a programme called "The Locker Room", an absolute disaster when compared to Woman's Hour. It folded- quite rightly- after one series.

    The poor preventative health care received by men (look how long it took to get "Well Man Clinics"), is directly down to men's nonchalant attitude towards their own health, and to a degree women's attitudes towards male health as well. For example, most men-single or otherwise- are aware of the tragic deaths from cervical and breast cancer, but few women know how common prostrate cancer is or the traumatic side effects that can arise from prostrate removal. Education in this respect has been sorely lacking.

    It is my earnest opinion that had men been more vociferous and united in their concerns, then there would have been far more political pressure to find a better test than the PSA, and by now - as with breast and cervical smears- men over a certain age would be routinely tested.

    I don't hold my breath in expectation that males will change anytime soon, or that male health will become a hot political potato. So all that is left is that males keep a check on their own health and push hard when they think they are suffering from a "male only" ailment.
    P

    Report message7

Back to top

About this Board

This was the BBC Radio 4 messageboard.

or register to take part in a discussion.


The message board is currently closed for posting.

The Radio 4 messageboard is now closed.

This messageboard is reactively moderated.

Find out more about this board's House Rules

Search this Board

Other BBC Messageboards

Copyright © 2015 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.