Drama & Readings  permalink

The New Marlowe

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Messages: 61 - 18 of 78
  • Message 61. 

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Sidpickle (U14495445) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    Mr Chandler ......... becoming a journalist on rags like the Daily Express. 

    In Mr Chandler's day I do not expect the Express was "a rag".

    Reference good books for radio plays: I assume the first step is to find books written in the first person such as the Marlowe novels. This must make it so much easier for the writers adapting the book. Then take out anything that does not develop the plot, which sadly removes much of Chandler's best prose but still leave enough for the play to work.

    Radio plays have to be so focused whereas a movie can develop cameos and put in scenes not related to the plot like the obligatory sex/bedroom scene.

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  • Message 62

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by U14780282 (U14780282) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    1) It seems that you are unfamiliar with the meaning of the words snarky, smug and superior. "Doesn't anybody read" fits those adjectives. Mentioning that I have been involved in producing radio theater does not.

    2a) As I said - in America, over the internet, R7 is 32kb STEREO. That remains true whether or not you accept that fact. God alone knows why you are going on about it.

    R7's bit rate is rather low, and we get excessive sibilance. They used to over-modulate the signal, but that has been fixed. Recordings from five years ago show a cleaner sound, but insufficient bass and low-mids.

    2b) We are not "elevated" in America. We are over to the left. And we can see as clearly as anyone else.

    2c) I can't imagine why you find a partial listing of American producers of radio theater to be so upsetting to your ego (or manhood, or pride, or patriotism, or whatever), but I frankly don't care, as I assume you have not heard much of their work, so are just venting for the purpose of venting..

    3) "American radio producers cannot just decide such matters by decree."

    You really need to work on your tone of voice, your weird anti-America bias, and your persecution complex. It is not becoming.

    I offered my opinion - no more no less. I did not "decide" for anyone else and never said that anyone else's opinion was wrong or invalid. If you don't wish to see people share their opinions, you should avoid discussion boards.

    4) "Auntie's team manages in its own small way."

    Often by purchasing outside productions, as you may have noticed.

    Nevertheless, novels do not [usually] make good radio dramas ... unless you are willing to spend a lot of money on adaptation and production, and to give them several hours of expensive broadcast time ... often for a tiny audience.

    Consider the effect of your upcoming budget cuts on adapting novels for radio.

    5a) "There isn't as much of a market here for your comments as you think"

    So ... my opinions are just so much junk and your are glittering gold? Who are YOU selling to. and what's YOUR market? May I assume that your poop does not stink and you put your pants on both legs at once?

    5b) " and I hope you know where you can put your Amazon rankings."

    Tut tut, son. No way to treat a guest. Do grow up before you post again. High school days are over.

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  • Message 63

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by caissier (U14073060) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    grigalem ...... it's interesting getting your and janaru's perspexctive about Chandler from American perspectives on BBC productions radiating around the world. There was debate last year on how well Dance to the Music of Time worked as adapted for Radio 4. I don't think there should be comparison. In a different media it's a different thing. There is the American company that does Shakespeare in one minute (or something) ..... Stratford it's not :). I agree weighty novels often don't make good radio plays or films .....but then there is I Claudius ....... I guess the important thing is the skill of the writer in creating an abstraction and the performers and director in giving life to an almost entirely new thing, working with the possibilities of sound and radio ..... and it is best to almost forget the original, certainly not to be hampered by reverence and a sense of duty.

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  • Message 64

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by U14780282 (U14780282) on Monday, 28th February 2011

    All good points!

    Mostly it is the writer/adapter, and most of the rest is the director. Bert Coules, the BBC guy who did the recent Sherlock Holmes series,followed your principles (so to speak) and did a magnificent job!

    But the one thing you left out is the budget, The budget (more or less) determines the quality of the actors. It determines the production values and sound effects (Foley or from a SFX record). And, most important, it buys you time - time to rehearse, to do retakes, to polish things in post-production.

    If you listen to American "golden age" radio, you can always tell when Orson Welles would waltz into a live broadcast of The Shadow without any rehearsal. His line readings demonstrated that he had no idea what the story was or how his lines contributed to it. (Still great fun, though!).

    And then there is the well-rehearsed interaction between live actor and live sound effects in the legendary "Sorry, Wrong Number" productions with Agnes Morehead on Suspence. Still astonishing today.

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  • Message 65

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Janaru (U12763248) on Tuesday, 8th March 2011

    Sorry it's taken so long to respond to your Message #49, Brian, but I've been sick and haven't been on here for awhile.

    My husband said there is, in fact, a slight emphasis on Place (I don't hear it myself). He thinks it's probably because we have a lot of different street types with the same name (i.e. Oak Place, Oak Circle, Oak Drive, etc...).

    So it would be almost like asking a queston. West Fifty-Forth Place? But take off the question. Hope that makes sense.


    And yes, I agree Becky, Dick Van Dyke is affectionately remembered by me as well :)


    in America, over the internet, R7 is 32kb STEREO 

    That's weird, I'm getting 48kb, but I'm using the WMA links, maybe that's why.


    If you listen to American "golden age" radio, you can always tell when Orson Welles would waltz into a live broadcast of The Shadow without any rehearsal. His line readings demonstrated that he had no idea what the story was or how his lines contributed to it. (Still great fun, though!).

    And then there is the well-rehearsed interaction between live actor and live sound effects in the legendary "Sorry, Wrong Number" productions with Agnes Morehead on Suspence. Still astonishing today. 



    Agreed. All of those were excellent and still fun to listen to.



    I felt that Playback was the weakest of this series so far. I'm not sure why. It just never quite gelled for some reason.



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  • Message 66

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by U14780282 (U14780282) on Wednesday, 9th March 2011

    All we have is the BBC iPlayer - which is 32kb. If you can tell me how to get WMP 48kb I would be ever grateful.

    The trouble with "Playback" was that it was a lousy story. Also. that Marlowe said hoo-fers (as if it came from "hooves" rather than "hoof".

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  • Message 67

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Janaru (U12763248) on Wednesday, 9th March 2011

    I've never read the book, so I don't know how close it was to the original, but it did seem unfinished, somehow.

    You can find the BBC WMA links here...

    beebotron.org/index3...

    Beebotron.org gathers all the BBC WMA links available and sorts them by tags. It's makes them much easier to find (i.e. by station, by genre, etc...).

    I use them because I have a funky laptop that doesn't play well with iPlayer at all.

    Hope it works for you. Good luck :)

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  • Message 68

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by U14780282 (U14780282) on Friday, 11th March 2011

    Beebotron? Who would have guessed! Thanks!

    48K! So why can't the BBC send 48K? Where does the Tron get a 48K signal from?



    So far, based on one half of one McLevy, the iPlayer sounds better - fuller and more natural - except for that damned sibilance. The Tron is quite thin in sound - almost all bass has disappeared. I'll have to do a serious comparison by recording both sources and doing an A/B.


    PS - The McLevy series is starting to get tedious and old, IMHO.

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  • Message 69

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by caissier (U14073060) on Friday, 11th March 2011

    I didn't manage to hear all the productions and now they are no longer available. These and others recent plays, such as I Claudius, are so good and significant that they should be given an extended run on the iplayer if not even made permanently listenable as educational and general cultural resources. It's a great pity to create such quality drama, at some cost, and then limit to a short period the time it can be appreciated.

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  • Message 70

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Janaru (U12763248) on Friday, 11th March 2011

    48K! So why can't the BBC send 48K? Where does the Tron get a 48K signal from?</quote

    They don't. These are all BBC created links to BBC programs in WMA format. The Beebotron just collects the links and puts them in one spot for easy access. For good or bad, It's one-hundred percent Beeb.


    PS - The McLevy series is starting to get tedious and old, IMHO. 

    Love my McLevy! I was a little worried with the first episode of the new series. It didn't do it for me, but this weeks was right back to the McLevy I know and love.

    So I guess Mr. Young will be all right to receive the torch from the incomparable Patrick Rayner :)



    ...they should be given an extended run on the iplayer ... 

    The recently announced that the program stacking experiment they did last year was a success and they will be making it a permanent thing. BBC blog post is here...

    www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/...

    :)


     

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  • Message 71

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by U14780282 (U14780282) on Saturday, 12th March 2011

    All I was saying is - if they already have a 48K signal why bother to send a different 32K signal over the iPlayer? You don't actually have to answer that.

    I have not yet done a close listen to determine if my first impression of the sound quality was accurate.

    Everyone has their own taste. I lost mine when they started getting into the bees.


    I notice that a lot of the drama productions and book readings are outsourced. I wonder what will happen to them when the budgets get cut.

    As to doing certain series over again, didn't the Beeb just do ANOTHER Holmes and Watson series with Clive Merriman recently (adapted by the brilliant what's-his-name)?

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  • Message 72

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Janaru (U12763248) on Thursday, 17th March 2011

    But, what if I want to answer that! Eh, don't worry, my answer is just a simple and uninformative "who knows" why they do what they do.

    Regarding the budget cuts, I think everyone is wondering about that one.

    Bert Coules adapts the Holmes stories, but I don't remember a new series recently.

    The last Holmes I remember him doing was an original of his, The Malbourne Point Mystery, which was a two-parter for Afternoon Play (I think) but that was a while ago.



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  • Message 73

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by U14780282 (U14780282) on Friday, 18th March 2011

    My apologies, Mr. Coules!

    I was taking a longer and wider view - there have been several versions of Watson & What's His Name over the years. And you don't don't hear people moaning "Why can't they find something ELSE to adapt?"

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  • Message 74

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by ann (U14817864) on Friday, 18th March 2011

    All the comments thus far prior to the broadcast of the the new Marlowe appear to be made by males. Having now heard The Big Sleep and speaking as a middle-aged female, my principal reaction was totally Kenneth Connor - phwaaah indeed! I don't know if it is an aspect of a woman having directed it, but for the first time I didn't just experience Marlowe as a tough guy but also a very sexy one! I have always found Chandler stories a bit hard to follow, with such tight twists and turns, but Toby Stephens had me glued to the set, along with the accomplished company. Having watched Damian Lewis as an American detective on TV on the much missed Life and also Idris Elba and Dominic West having made much respected representations on American series, I had few misgivings about the lead being played by a Brit. And the sharp Chandler phrases rang beautifully. I love Ed Bishop's voice on radio and would not downplay his contribution to the oeuvre. However, much like Andrew Davis did for Pride and Prejudice and other costume drama, this current outing has given another dimension that for me makes the following episodes musts!  i absolutely agree! I only heard one episode - by accident... .. and I was MOST pleasantly surprised by the wit, pace, daring and sexiness of it! I would love to get the episodes on cd - not just for me but for my mother who is 85 as I know she would love them. Anyone any idea if they will be available to buy/download?

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  • Message 75

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by lifeonmarsfan (U14300854) on Friday, 18th March 2011

    All four are being advertised from the Classic Serial page (follow the links on the right of the page). The site will also tell you where you can order the cds or downloads from.

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  • Message 76

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Janaru (U12763248) on Sunday, 20th March 2011

    I was taking a longer and wider view - there have been several versions of Watson & What's His Name over the years. And you don't don't hear people moaning "Why can't they find something ELSE to adapt?" 

    Ah, I see, and I agree. I like both versions of Chandler. They both have their merits and I don't see any problem with redoing them.

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  • Message 77

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by U14780282 (U14780282) on Sunday, 20th March 2011

    Apparently, we are in the minority.

    Not that any of this will matter when when they cut the budget for all of these expensive purchased productions and replace them with 26-part book readings.

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  • Message 78

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by ann (U14817864) on Sunday, 20th March 2011

    thank you!

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