The BBC  permalink

Newsreader's French pronunciation

This discussion has been closed.

Messages: 1 - 50 of 79
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by strictlyaddicted2dancing (U14110008) on Saturday, 7th June 2014

    At last this evening on the BBC news at 7.20, the correct name for the new flower market in Paris was pronounced correctly! The radio newsreaders failed miserably.

    "Le Marche aux fleurs de la Reine Elizabeth 2" .... Marche has an acute accent on the last letter, so should be pronounced as "Marchay". Only the TV news got it right.

    Surely it's a simple matter of proper research when reading the news and a pride in the job of reading each word clearly and correctly, especially foreign words?

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Andy (U14048329) on Sunday, 8th June 2014

    Le haitch!

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by me (U14258191) on Sunday, 8th June 2014

    "Marche has an acute accent"
    So similar to "Marché?

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Monday, 9th June 2014


    Surely it's a simple matter of proper research when reading the news and a pride in the job of reading each word clearly and correctly, especially foreign words?
     


    Where do you draw the line with pronounciations of foriegn names?

    Is Paris "Pair-iss" or "Pair-ee"

    Is Los Angeles "Loss An-gel-us" or "Los On-hell-us"

    Is Hawaii "Ha-wa-ee" or "Ha-wire" or "Ha-va-ee"?

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by strictlyaddicted2dancing (U14110008) on Monday, 9th June 2014

    "Marche has an acute accent"
    So similar to "Marché? 
    Exactement mon ami smiley - smiley

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by germinator (U13411914) on Tuesday, 10th June 2014

    'Marché Aux Fleurs Reine Elizabeth II' : www.bing.com/images/...

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by beerhead (U15819967) on Tuesday, 10th June 2014

    The presenter on the news channel just pronounced Jolie (as in Angelina...) in a very sexy French way... Works for mesmiley - smiley

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Procyon (U16040304) on Wednesday, 11th June 2014

    For the English it is a matter of pride to mispronounce foreign words, French ones in particular. I cringe every time someone talks about a village "fate", as if fête was just too difficult, presumably because it's got a foreign-looking squiggle on the 'e'.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Onslow The Cat (U13672446) on Wednesday, 11th June 2014

    presumably because it's got a foreign-looking squiggle on the 'e' 

    In French spelling the circumflex denotes a missing consonant

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    And anyway this pronunciation is expounded in other threads too numerous to mention, so I won't smiley - devil

    Before I go off-topic why don't we insist that Europeans pronounce London, Bristol or other places in the UK the way we do? Ooops that was covered elsewhere in a now closed thread.

    Oh dear this thread is *Doomed* I fear smiley - smiley

    smiley - blackcat

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Procyon (U16040304) on Thursday, 12th June 2014

    presumably because it's got a foreign-looking squiggle on the 'e'  In French spelling the circumflex denotes a missing consonant  Just so. Unlike the acute, the circumflex doesn't alter the pronunciation of the letter, so it's "fet" not "fate". And anyway this pronunciation is expounded in other threads too numerous to mention, so I won't .  Please do. I'm aware of only one other thread where this is mentioned. Oh dear this thread is *Doomed* I fear   Why should a thread be doomed when its topic is discussed elsewhere? Cropping up several places under different headings indicates a topic that provokes interest and generates debate. Isn't that what a discussion forum is all about? If threads were closed as soon as they drifted slightly off-topic there wouldn't be much left.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Onslow The Cat (U13672446) on Thursday, 12th June 2014

    Why should a thread be doomed when its topic is discussed elsewhere? Cropping up several places under different headings indicates a topic that provokes interest and generates debate 

    Because the BBC Mods like to keep only one thread per subject open at any one time and will close duplicates. That's why I can't tell you what other threads about the same subject have been posted (well not easily) but you can have a go yourself. They are out there in the ether.

    smiley - blackcat

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Friday, 13th June 2014

    Where do you draw the line with pronounciations of foriegn names?

    Is Paris "Pair-iss" or "Pair-ee" 

    Old chestnut, this. Paris (French) and Paris (English) are two different words which happen to be spelt the same way, in the same way that Parijs (Dutch) and Parigi (Italian) are spelt differently.

    Each has its own local pronunciation.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Friday, 13th June 2014

    Different words? So you are saying that the English Paris is not Paris France?

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Procyon (U16040304) on Friday, 13th June 2014

    GZ: Is Paris "Pair-iss" or "Pair-ee"  Neither. Why would you pronounce the first syllable 'pair' rather than 'par'?
    Onslow: Because the BBC Mods like to keep only one thread per subject open at any one time and will close duplicates.  Why? If several threads end up discussing the same topic via different routes then clearly the topic is of considerable interest to a wide range of people. It's noticeable that these so-called duplicate threads are much less likely to be shut down since Dee took over, and I think this is a good thing.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Friday, 13th June 2014

    Different words? So you are saying that the English Paris is not Paris France? 
    I am not saying that at all! I am talking about the words (as you acknowledge). There are quite a few different ways of spelling (and therefore pronouncing) the name of the French capital city, which I quoted in my post, if you re-read it.

    Just because the spelling of the English version of the name happens to be the same as the French version doesn't affect how it's pronounced in English-speaking countries. This is linguistics, not geography!

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Erza Scarlett (U16043197) on Friday, 13th June 2014

    Different words? So you are saying that the English Paris is not Paris France? 
    I am not saying that at all! I am talking about the words (as you acknowledge). There are quite a few different ways of spelling (and therefore pronouncing) the name of the French capital city, which I quoted in my post, if you re-read it.

    Just because the spelling of the English version of the name happens to be the same as the French version doesn't affect how it's pronounced in English-speaking countries. This is linguistics, not geography! 
    The word is the same, it is just the pronunciation that is different because, over time, especially in Britain, the pronunciation changed. You claimed that it was a different word when, in fact it is a different pronunciation of the same word.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Friday, 13th June 2014


    Why would you pronounce the first syllable 'pair' rather than 'par'?
     


    Because that's how I roll. smiley - smiley

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Friday, 13th June 2014


    Just because the spelling of the English version of the name happens to be the same as the French version doesn't affect how it's pronounced in English-speaking countries. This is linguistics, not geography!
     


    I guess I'm missing your point Jeff.

    The point of this thread is that the OP is complaining that BBC Newsreaders dont use the French pronounciation when saying certain French words, names, place names.

    This is why I asked the OP "where do you draw the line?" when it came to deciding which French pronounciations to use vs. English and used the example of the French vs. English pronounciation of Paris.

    Thus, I was talking specifically about Paris, France and the differences between the traditional French and English pronounciations.

    So I admit to be baffled by what you are on about.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    Ok, I accept what you're saying. Whether or not it's the same word or different words with the same spelling, let's all agree that most large cities (and some not so large) have long-standing localised pronunciations, and sometimes different spellings. So that's where the line gets drawn.

    Interestingly, Italy for some reason seems to have more than its fair share of cities with different versions of their names according to language.

    Oh, and (just for fun), what its the difference between Lille and Rijsel?

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by strictlyaddicted2dancing (U14110008) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    Ok, I accept what you're saying. Whether or not it's the same word or different words with the same spelling, let's all agree that most large cities (and some not so large) have long-standing localised pronunciations, and sometimes different spellings. So that's where the line gets drawn.

    Interestingly, Italy for some reason seems to have more than its fair share of cities with different versions of their names according to language.

    Oh, and (just for fun), what its the difference between Lille and Rijsel? 
    As the OP, my original point was about Newsreaders' pronunciation, who are paid to read the news, eloquently, audibly and with clear enunciation. This should include correct pronunciation. After all, that's what they are meant to prepare for in advance of their newscast. ... And paid for! That's their job.

    The difference between the pronunciation of other words , such as Paris, and the one I was posting about is that there is no alternative to the noun "Marche" with emphasis on the "e" as in market. "Marche" without the accent translates as walk and is part of a verb.

    The really irritating pronunciation by many people is "Lingerie" ... "Longeray" is completely wrong ... Should be "Lanjeri". But it's just something we have to accept.

    The BBC should get it right .. No excuse.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Erza Scarlett (U16043197) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    Except 'lingerie' is a loan word - it has been appropriated by English - and is fair game for the vagaries of local pronunciation.

    On Marche smiley - winkeye, they were not the only one to get it wrong in one place, and correct it later on:

    www.telegraph.co.uk/...

    And, yes I know that it is 'Marché'.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by strictlyaddicted2dancing (U14110008) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    Except 'lingerie' is a loan word - it has been appropriated by English - and is fair game for the vagaries of local pronunciation.

    On Marche smiley - winkeye, they were not the only one to get it wrong in one place, and correct it later on:

    www.telegraph.co.uk/...

    And, yes I know that it is 'Marché'. 
    I agree some French words are borrowed, such a s "lingerie", but the English spoil the sensuous proper pronunciation for some reason and it's much more seductive said properly!

    I read the Telegraph every day and forgive journalists the odd "faux pas" .. Am sure you don't need a hint on pronouncing that one smiley - winkeye

    The BBC however are speaking to the whole nation in their broadcasts and should get it right.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Erza Scarlett (U16043197) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    But, it is surely more serious that they do not put the accent on the word. As for the BBC, if the newsreader took German, rather than French at school, and didn't notice the acute accent; maybe the acute accent wasn't there in the notes and they just uncritically read it. There are many reasons. Things like "I knew how to say it, but the words just came out of my mouth all wrong... " happen to us all, so I tend to be forgiving of the odd mistake.

    You worry about that, this is MUCH more serious:

    https://www.youtube...

    especially for the second one. They never get it right, they never even TRY to get it right.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) ** on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    You may find that the companies concerned do nit want their names to be pronounced in Korean .....,and thus the pronunciation used by the BBC is what they have asked for/told the BBC .

    It us like jaguar cars being pronounced jag u are in the uk
    And jagwah. In the USA .

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Erza Scarlett (U16043197) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    So, you think that they went out from Korea and said to themselves, we don't really want them to pronounce our company names correctly? I really don't mind little mistakes, but the Hyundai one splits the word into three syllables where there are two, and splits the Hangul yeo between two of them. It is exactly the same as dividing a letter in two.

    In the end, what they and other companies have done, is simply given up and allowed it to happen; they gave in to the tide of inevitability.

    The Jaguar one is just a dialect variation.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by strictlyaddicted2dancing (U14110008) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    But, it is surely more serious that they do not put the accent on the word. As for the BBC, if the newsreader took German, rather than French at school, and didn't notice the acute accent; maybe the acute accent wasn't there in the notes and they just uncritically read it. There are many reasons. Things like "I knew how to say it, but the words just came out of my mouth all wrong... " happen to us all, so I tend to be forgiving of the odd mistake.

    You worry about that, this is MUCH more serious:

    https://www.youtube...

    especially for the second one. They never get it right, they never even TRY to get it right. 
    Golly ... This is a can of worms! Now you're into trade names, which is very objective to most people.

    A m only interested in correct pronunciation by the BBC of the spoken word of everyday European language. Foreign accents obviously make a difference to the sound.

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) on Saturday, 14th June 2014



    You worry about that, this is MUCH more serious:

    https://www.youtube...

     

    If I could guarantee she'd be my teacher I'd learn Korean. She could pronounce lingerie any way she wants to.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) ** on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    Sadly I cannit see the "how to say Korean names "
    on the BBC website but you can be sure that they did check with the companies
    Readers may like to have a go at some
    www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/...

    And the explanation on the third largest city in Switzerland
    Is worth a look at www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/...

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    I can see how its a no win situation for newsreaders as even you as the OP admit that you advocate that they use french pronunciations of some french words and phrases and English pronunciations of other french words and phrases.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    Does someone at the BBC compile a list of which foreign places, words and phrases are spoken with an English pronunciation and which with a pronunciation native to that country?

    And how is this communicated to the news reader when reading the teleprompter? Are the words highlighted by a different colour when the foreign pronunciation is to be used? Is it spelt phonetically?

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) ** on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    Does someone at the BBC compile a list of which foreign places, words and phrases are spoken with an English pronunciation and which with a pronunciation native to that country?  

    The BBC has a unit which does all of this - and can be used by ANY programme maker for the BBC - as they say "Pronunciations used on the BBC should be accurate and consistent."
    see www.bbc.co.uk/commis...


    And how is this communicated to the news reader when reading the teleprompter? Are the words highlighted by a different colour when the foreign pronunciation is to be used? Is it spelt phonetically?  

    Most of the time the news reader will know how to pronounce the word as they will have rehearsed it -
    (on other programmes there may be a simplified spelling)

    There is the inverse problem with the Real time subtitles which are done by voice recognition - the system has to be taught what the spelling is! but of course the re-speaker can distort or use a strange word !

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) ** on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    I forgot to add that you can read what the "right" answer is

    BBC Pronouncing Dictionary of British Names, 1971 ISBN: 0192129767 / 0-19-212976-7

    Oxford BBC Guide to Pronunciation: The Essential Handbook of the Spoken Word (Hardback) 2006 ISBN 10: 0192807102 / ISBN 13: 9780192807106

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by strictlyaddicted2dancing (U14110008) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    I can see how its a no win situation for newsreaders as even you as the OP admit that you advocate that they use french pronunciations of some french words and phrases and English pronunciations of other french words and phrases.  I didn't advocate that newsreaders can use "Carte Blanche" for pronunciation of French words.

    The fact is they have plenty of time to research the content of the news bulletin before they read it live. They don't just turn up for the half a hour as seen on BBC. Although I have never read the news, I am sure I would want the job satisfaction of correctly enunciating the script. Rarely do they fluff their lines.

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    Well there must be a disconnect somewhere.

    Technologist said that the BBC has established guidelines for the pronunciation of foreign words, names and places that all of the presenters are required to know and rehearse.

    Yet a lot of threads get started by posters such as yourself to suggest faux-pas are occurring.

    So someone somewhere is not getting a memo according to some posters.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by strictlyaddicted2dancing (U14110008) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    Well there must be a disconnect somewhere.

    Technologist said that the BBC has established guidelines for the pronunciation of foreign words, names and places that all of the presenters are required to know and rehearse.

    Yet a lot of threads get started by posters such as yourself to suggest faux-pas are occurring.

    So someone somewhere is not getting a memo according to some posters. 
    Don't understand your point? The fact is that there is plenty of time for newsreaders to rehearse, research and hone their presentation of the news. Am sure memos are received, but when newscasters are on the "front line" or in real time, a memo doesn't help.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) ** on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    The disconnect is what a viewer may consider one pronunciation which is not what either the BBC pronunciation unit has established ( which may not be a unique version) or what the presenter has said. ( which may not be what they should have said. And may be a genuine mistake)

    Any news reader should be aware of events to have the right pronunciation of the names.particularly foreign ones But there are some. Like Plaistow which is pronounced depending on where it is .. Is it likely that a news reader would off the top of their head know which one should be used.?
    See
    www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/...
    It think it is more likely that they would use the one which is in the London borough if Newham until someone points it out.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by wolfie (U15842015) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    does the op think that all French news readers pronounce british names and words as we say them...

    of course not...

    even the americans don't oronounce words as we do...and they speak English...

    lets celebrate the difference between the countries...not homogenise everything....

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by strictlyaddicted2dancing (U14110008) on Saturday, 14th June 2014

    does the op think that all French news readers pronounce british names and words as we say them...

    of course not...

    even the americans don't oronounce words as we do...and they speak English...

    lets celebrate the difference between the countries...not homogenise everything.... 
    I think this is a different argument, as to whether the French or Americans pronounce English words as the EnglIsh do. Similarly do the Spanish, Australians or Russians etc. No, obviously not, but that's their business. The diversity is interesting though.

    I still maintain that the BBC, a British establishment delivering World News on our TVs and radios, has a responsibility to do so as near to perfect as possible.

    If we want to hear alternative pronunciation, we have plenty of programmes, which can provide it. Eastenders, Casualty, Masterchef, to name a few.

    Then there's dialect ... Ah how I love hearing folk from Yorkshire smiley - winkeye

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Sunday, 15th June 2014

    Another one that rankles is sports reporters that refer to the "Tour de Frahnce"", i.e. mixing pronunciations.

    But then, sports reporters are well known for not being able to pronounce anything remotely foreign (like names).

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by germinator (U13411914) on Sunday, 15th June 2014

    I see no mixing there, unless you believe that all French speakers have the same accent, or that only one is acceptable.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Procyon (U16040304) on Sunday, 15th June 2014

    But then, sports reporters are well known for not being able to pronounce anything remotely foreign (like names).  Or "kilometre".

    Although unfortunately their ignorant and (at first) amusing mispronunciation, where it sounds similar to "speedometer", is appearing even in news, documentary and science programmes.

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Sunday, 15th June 2014

    But then, sports reporters are well known for not being able to pronounce anything remotely foreign (like names).  Or "kilometre".

    Although unfortunately their ignorant and (at first) amusing mispronunciation, where it sounds similar to "speedometer", is appearing even in news, documentary and science programmes. 

    Are you suggesting that it should be pronounced as the French say it, complete with e-grave? Otherwise this is in danger of descending into another 'haitch' thread.

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Sunday, 15th June 2014

    This is why I said this is a no-win situation for the BBC.

    You can't get 5 people in a discussion thread to agree on proper pronunciations of words.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Procyon (U16040304) on Sunday, 15th June 2014

    But then, sports reporters are well known for not being able to pronounce anything remotely foreign (like names).  Or "kilometre".

    Although unfortunately their ignorant and (at first) amusing mispronunciation, where it sounds similar to "speedometer", is appearing even in news, documentary and science programmes. 

    Are you suggesting that it should be pronounced as the French say it, complete with e-grave? Otherwise this is in danger of descending into another 'haitch' thread. 
    No, I wasn't saying we should pronounce it like the French, just that we shouldn't pronounce it like a sports commentator. (No slur on sports commentators intended - I was being facetious.)

    It should, logically and for consistency, be pronounced as in effect two words (kilo metre) in a similar way to centimetre and kilogram. (Why do people always try to curtail discussions on pronunciation with irrelevant quips about "h"?)

    You can't get 5 people in a discussion thread to agree on proper pronunciations of words.  That's because most discussions have no basis in logic so, as with the aspiration of "h", you just get people asserting that their pronunciation is right. I'm suggesting that "kilometre" is different in that there is a compelling logical argument.

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by strictlyaddicted2dancing (U14110008) on Monday, 16th June 2014

    This is why I said this is a no-win situation for the BBC.

    You can't get 5 people in a discussion thread to agree on proper pronunciations of words. 
    Except that the BBC should know, as a responsibility to its listeners/viewers, what is accepted and correct pronunciation of foreign words spoken by Briitish newsreaders and delivered to the audience.

    Discussions by us in this thread, are totally subjective, but interesting ... Mostly smiley - winkeye

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by wolfie (U15842015) on Monday, 16th June 2014

    so what is acceptable...

    is paris and rome acceptable...

    or should it be paree and roma...


    we anglicise certain place names and words...

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Monday, 16th June 2014

    But then, sports reporters are well known for not being able to pronounce anything remotely foreign (like names).  Or "kilometre".

    Although unfortunately their ignorant and (at first) amusing mispronunciation, where it sounds similar to "speedometer", is appearing even in news, documentary and science programmes. 

    Are you suggesting that it should be pronounced as the French say it, complete with e-grave? Otherwise this is in danger of descending into another 'haitch' thread. 
    No, I wasn't saying we should pronounce it like the French, just that we shouldn't pronounce it like a sports commentator. (No slur on sports commentators intended - I was being facetious.)

    It should, logically and for consistency, be pronounced as in effect two words (kilo metre) in a similar way to centimetre and kilogram. (Why do people always try to curtail discussions on pronunciation with irrelevant quips about "h"?)

    You can't get 5 people in a discussion thread to agree on proper pronunciations of words.  That's because most discussions have no basis in logic so, as with the aspiration of "h", you just get people asserting that their pronunciation is right. I'm suggesting that "kilometre" is different in that there is a compelling logical argument. 

    No, I wasn't trying to curtail discussion on pronunciation (how could I?) or make irrelevant quips.

    I was suggesting that to avoid derailing this discussion, perhaps a better place to discuss non-French-specific or foreign place name pronunciation would be the long-running general pronunciation thread: www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    (Yes, I admit to veering slightly off-topic already myself smiley - winkeye)

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by Procyon (U16040304) on Monday, 16th June 2014

    I was suggesting that to avoid derailing this discussion, perhaps a better place to discuss non-French-specific or foreign place name pronunciation would be the long-running general pronunciation thread  "Kilometre" has been discussed there. Bringing it up here might raise the question with a new set of people who have some kind of interest in pronunciation. That's no bad thing surely.

    As for "derailing the discussion", how much is there to say about the pronunciation of "le marché"? It would be a very short discussion if there were no digressions.

    On the subject of English v. native pronunciation of place names, it's interesting that nobody seriously suggests we should say "Moskva" or "Italia", yet in recent years it has become de rigueur to adopt local pronunciation of, for example, Mumbai and Myanmar.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by wolfie (U15842015) on Monday, 16th June 2014

    that's not about pronunciation...

    that's the new names for those places...

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Erza Scarlett (U16043197) on Monday, 16th June 2014

    In the cases of the likes of Myanmar and Mumbai, it is more about the place-name having been completely changed, so it is very different.

    Report message50

Back to top

About this Board

The Points of View team invite you to discuss BBC Television programmes.

Add basic Smileys or extra Smileys to your posts.

Questions? Check the BBC FAQ for answers first!

Go to: BBC News Have your say to discuss topics in the news

Make a complaint? Go to the BBC complaints website.

BBC News: Off-topic for this board, so contact them directly with your feedback: Contact BBC News

or register to take part in a discussion.


The message board is currently closed for posting.


Mon-Sat: 0900-2300
Sun: 1000-2300

This messageboard is reactively moderated.

Find out more about this board's House Rules

Search this Board

Recent Discussions

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.