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TV licence query..

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Messages: 1 - 22 of 22
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by wolfie (U15842015) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    I have a TV licence...

    I have a tablet..

    I go to a friends house that has no TV or TV licence...

    Am I allowed to watch live broadcasts there on my tablet...or are my friends allowed to watch live broadcasts on my tablet..

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    I have a TV licence...

    I have a tablet..

    I go to a friends house that has no TV or TV licence...

    Am I allowed to watch live broadcasts there on my tablet...or are my friends allowed to watch live broadcasts on my tablet.. 
    Yes. You don't need a TV licence to watch on a tablet as 2% of the population do.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    Looks like the answer's no. From this link (which actually discusses second homes, but still seems relevant)

    www.tvlicensing.co.u...

    "You don’t need a separate TV Licence for
    Any device powered solely by its own internal batteries (i.e. it is not connected to an aerial or plugged into the mains). Your main home’s TV Licence will cover this."

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    I have a TV licence...

    I have a tablet..

    I go to a friends house that has no TV or TV licence...

    Am I allowed to watch live broadcasts there on my tablet...or are my friends allowed to watch live broadcasts on my tablet.. 
    That is a bit like asking if you can watch tv in a cafe -where you can get a wifi signal -the simple answer is yes -providing you have a licence-then you can watch tv anywhere

    www.tvlicensing.co.u...

    If your friends want to huddle round in their unlicensed home-then enjoysmiley - ok

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by wolfie (U15842015) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    You do need a licence to watch live broadcasts..

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    Sorry, I meant yes, you can watch. Forgot which way round the question was posed.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    I have a TV licence...

    I have a tablet..

    I go to a friends house that has no TV or TV licence...

    Am I allowed to watch live broadcasts there on my tablet...or are my friends allowed to watch live broadcasts on my tablet.. 
    Yes. You don't need a TV licence to watch on a tablet as 2% of the population do. 
    Wrong Phil-ap

    www.tvlicensing.co.u...

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by DaphneMS (U16022021) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    ... -the simple answer is yes -providing you have a licence-then you can watch tv anywhere...smiley - ok 

    I think its premises that are licenced rather than people.

    It's against the law to watch/record live TV at an unlicensed premises - even if the equipment is yours.

    Employers were warned during the Olympics that employees can't watch TV if the place of work is not licenced.

    www.bbc.co.uk/news/e...

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    I have a TV licence...

    I have a tablet..

    I go to a friends house that has no TV or TV licence...

    Am I allowed to watch live broadcasts there on my tablet...or are my friends allowed to watch live broadcasts on my tablet.. 
    Yes. You don't need a TV licence to watch on a tablet as 2% of the population do. 
    Wrong Phil-ap

    www.tvlicensing.co.u... 
    That only applies to live broadcasting. I can watch as many progammes as I like on iPlayer.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    From that link

    "If employees have devices such as mobile phones or laptops plugged into the mains at work, their workplace will need to have a licence."

    From this

    www.tvlicensing.co.u...

    "As long as the address where you live is licensed, you’re also covered to watch TV outside your home using any device powered solely by its own internal batteries. This includes your mobile phone, laptop and tablet."

    So it is the power source that makes the difference.smiley - smiley

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    Exception: If you only watch catch-up services online, then you don’t need a licence. For example, you don’t need one to use BBC iPlayer, or ITV player, to catch up on programmes after they have been shown on TV.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    I have a TV licence...

    I have a tablet..

    I go to a friends house that has no TV or TV licence...

    Am I allowed to watch live broadcasts there on my tablet...or are my friends allowed to watch live broadcasts on my tablet.. 
    Yes. You don't need a TV licence to watch on a tablet as 2% of the population do. 
    Wrong Phil-ap

    www.tvlicensing.co.u... 
    That only applies to live broadcasting. I can watch as many progammes as I like on iPlayer. 
    wolfie's query was about live tv.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by DaphneMS (U16022021) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    From that link

    "If employees have devices such as mobile phones or laptops plugged into the mains at work, their workplace will need to have a licence."

    From this

    www.tvlicensing.co.u...

    "As long as the address where you live is licensed, you’re also covered to watch TV outside your home using any device powered solely by its own internal batteries. This includes your mobile phone, laptop and tablet."

    So it is the power source that makes the difference.smiley - smiley 


    Ah, I see - I overlooked that distinction, thanks for the clarification. smiley - ok

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by wolfie (U15842015) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    Yes dogcody...

    We all know you don't need a licence for catch up..that's why I specifically said live...

    Pity philap didn't spot that...

    To be honest...I'm none the wiser about my original query..



    The licencing laws seem to be a mish mash...made on the hoof as technology gets better..

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by tumteatum (U15488526) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    My understanding is that your tablet would be covered under your home licence. As only one licence is required per household regardless of the number of devices.

    You could take your tablet to a friend's house to watch live broadcasts but it must run from its batteries not the mains. It seems to me that the BBC regard "installing" a television receiver as important here. You would need to be watching as well. I would have thought your tablet would fall under the exemptions for second homes (where they apply).

    Part 4 of the Communications Act 2003 sets out the basics but you'll see at S364 the Act seems to provide the BBC with flexibility on restrictions and conditions. So the guidance is relevant.

    If the law is behind technology, it wouldn't be the first time.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    If the law is behind technology, it wouldn't be the first time. 
    There have been handheld TVs since the 70s. Watching TV on a tablet may be rather better, but not that different from the standpoint of licensing.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by tumteatum (U15488526) on Monday, 10th March 2014

    You are quite right. I remember being very impressed with a portable battery operated tv back in the late 70s. It was black and white, reception was dreadful and the screen size was only a smidge bigger than the mobile phones of today. It was small rather than tiny but I think that had something to do with the size of batteries.

    I just mentioned it as a general point about the problems with the law.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by st3ph3n (U13643748) on Wednesday, 12th March 2014

    My understanding is that your tablet would be covered under your home licence. As only one licence is required per household regardless of the number of devices.

    You could take your tablet to a friend's house to watch live broadcasts but it must run from its batteries not the mains. It seems to me that the BBC regard "installing" a television receiver as important here. You would need to be watching as well. I would have thought your tablet would fall under the exemptions for second homes (where they apply).

    Part 4 of the Communications Act 2003 sets out the basics but you'll see at S364 the Act seems to provide the BBC with flexibility on restrictions and conditions. So the guidance is relevant.

    If the law is behind technology, it wouldn't be the first time. 
    The Performing Rights Society (PRS) come down hard on premises where radio stations are being played (without a PRS licence) of music OR dialogue either to employees or visitors etc. e.g. the hairdresser listening to his radio whilst he cuts your hair. Also applies to premises where the owner plays his/her own self-recorded tapes.
    I wonder if a good tablet would bypass this awful excessive and intrusive, now almost archaic charge.
    The TV licence seems quite tame against the PRS regime.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Permtong (U15934379) on Wednesday, 12th March 2014

    Why not email TVL and ask them.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Permtong (U15934379) on Wednesday, 12th March 2014

    So it is the power source that makes the difference 

    Yes; remember to pull the plug out if you get a knock on the door one dark and stormy night.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) on Wednesday, 12th March 2014

    The battery exemption goes back many years and there were some interesting " car radios " which were battery powered ( in those days car radios had their own licence )

    But the PRS issue is just the rights holder being paid for the usage ,,,
    Just as they are being paid by the broadcaster for broadcasting it....
    Which is not the same as the public performance in the hair dressers.

    Unless you would like the broadcaster to also pay public performance .....
    I,e £77.59. For each salon ... Times14000. Say arround a million pounds.
    And then for all other workplaces ,,....

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Permtong (U15934379) on Wednesday, 12th March 2014

    The whole PRS thing is a travesty.

    A lot of three chord tunesters have become millionaires purely because of massive advances in electronic technology; and if they haven't become millionaires their minders have. Its just a turf war with a lobby in government.

    I don't notice the guy who made my radio chasing me for money each time I switch it on. When I walk up a staircase the carpenter who made it doesn't stick his hand out for an extra bung. etc. what is it with these people.

    A lot of these rather airheaded and pretentious nine day wonders would be singing for their supper on the pavement if it wasn't for the seriously intelligent people who have brought us all the modern electronics and a whole range of other things.

    In my view, you sing a tune - great - job done, now lets get on with something important. We live in this soup of extraneous noise and it needs to be cut down to size.

    Report message22

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