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listening to radio through tv - licensing issues

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Messages: 1 - 36 of 36
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by tumteatum (U15488526) on Wednesday, 12th June 2013

    Apologies if someone has asked about this before.

    Like most households we are having to cut back. It has occurred to us that apart from a very short list of programmes we are spending more time listening to the radio than watching tv. Also, we've talked about how we waste our evenings staring at the screen completely disengaged with what's available - so we want to use our time more productively.

    It used to be that you needed a licence for radios but that no longer applies. However, we listen to the radio through our tv, it has far better sound than our dab radios.

    I understand that our argument for not having a tv licence because we only listen to the radio on it will not go far with tv licensing - a bit like, "I only watch ITV".

    However, does anyone know if it is possible to block receiving tv programmes but keep radio? or on we on a hiding to nothing?

    Thank you

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Wednesday, 12th June 2013

    Why not just ditch the tv and buy a radio?

    You only need a licence if you watch "live" tv -so catch up services like I -player do not need a licence to view

    That may change at some point of course

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Wednesday, 12th June 2013

    Sorry -just read your message again- but the sentiment is still the same- ditch the tv-keep the radio- you won't have something to compare to.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by tumteatum (U15488526) on Wednesday, 12th June 2013

    Hmm ... you may have a point but it's not ideal.

    To get a decent DAB radio with remote control is going to cost as much as the licence fee currently does. Rather defeats the object.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Wednesday, 12th June 2013

    But it is a one-off purchase -unless you intend to buy a new one each year?

    You cannot block tv signals.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by captainMouse (U14652804) on Wednesday, 12th June 2013

    my experience of DAB has not been good, I'd stick with the TV.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Testcard (U1164920) on Wednesday, 12th June 2013

    Another option to consider would be an Internet radio that gives you a huge range of stations and genres. You can usually connect them to a hi-fi system if you want improved sound quality.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Wednesday, 12th June 2013

    Another option to consider would be an Internet radio that gives you a huge range of stations and genres. You can usually connect them to a hi-fi system if you want improved sound quality.  Yes, they make an inexpensive patch cord that fits into your headphone out jack on your computer and then splits into a pair of standard red and white (left and right) RCA jacks, which can be plugged into the tape or AUX jacks on the back of any standard stereo system.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Cyril-Furr (U10382673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    I understand there has been a test case & in the situation of a TV only being used as a radio reciever, no licence will be required - no detuning needed, just care NOT to watch any of the TV channels.

    It seems that technology has well & truly overtaken TV licensing's old rules & regulations.
    Please correct this POV with evidence if incorrect.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    So what is your evidence of this test case?

    As I understand it you have to declare you are using the tv just to play video games on it-not sure if there is such a declaration about radio

    I also think it will be hard to prove you just listen to the radio on it-and if you get caught it is expensive

    At the end of the day we are talking about £146 -the OP could go down to £49 for a b &w licence if whatever he needs to receive a signal is compatible

    So 40p per day or 13p per day

    It is still not a bad deal -even in these cash strapped times

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Lee (U1149673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    I understand there has been a test case & in the situation of a TV only being used as a radio reciever, no licence will be required - no detuning needed, just care NOT to watch any of the TV channels.

    It seems that technology has well & truly overtaken TV licensing's old rules & regulations.
    Please correct this POV with evidence if incorrect. 
    It's rather hard to 'prove' or 'disprove' a case without any knowledge of it. As you're the one that raised it as a topic for discussion, I think the onus is really on you to provide a link to where you heard about it so we can all judge for ourselves.

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Cyril-Furr (U10382673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    So what is your evidence of this test case?

    As I understand it you have to declare you are using the tv just to play video games on it-not sure if there is such a declaration about radio

    I also think it will be hard to prove you just listen to the radio on it-and if you get caught it is expensive

    At the end of the day we are talking about £146 -the OP could go down to £49 for a b &w licence if whatever he needs to receive a signal is compatible

    So 40p per day or 13p per day

    It is still not a bad deal -even in these cash strapped times 
    It is very simple, you do not need a TV licence to listen to a radio program, provided that is all you use the TV for, there is no legal problem - a better idea might be to use a Freeview box & connect it to a hi-fi.

    The reason people have to do this, is in many remote parts of the UK, the only radio signal available comes from a digital TV transmitter, the multiplex contains both TV & radio signals. Other remote locations can only recieve a signal from Astra at 28.2.

    DAB is a very poor quality system compared to Radio via a TV transmitter, DAB has very poor coverage - it is rubbish where I live, though I get perfect signals from two main TV transmitters.

    If you have a GOOD look at the TVL website, you will find this is all confirmed on there.

    If a TVL rep calls, you are not legally required to give them access to your home, no matter how much they might plead.

    RADIO IS FREE, keep it that way!

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Cyril-Furr (U10382673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    I understand there has been a test case & in the situation of a TV only being used as a radio reciever, no licence will be required - no detuning needed, just care NOT to watch any of the TV channels.

    It seems that technology has well & truly overtaken TV licensing's old rules & regulations.
    Please correct this POV with evidence if incorrect. 
    It's rather hard to 'prove' or 'disprove' a case without any knowledge of it. As you're the one that raised it as a topic for discussion, I think the onus is really on you to provide a link to where you heard about it so we can all judge for ourselves. 
    www.tvlicensing.co.u...

    www.christiansat.org...

    https://www.whatdot...

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Cyril-Furr (U10382673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    I understand there has been a test case & in the situation of a TV only being used as a radio reciever, no licence will be required - no detuning needed, just care NOT to watch any of the TV channels.

    It seems that technology has well & truly overtaken TV licensing's old rules & regulations.
    Please correct this POV with evidence if incorrect. 
    It's rather hard to 'prove' or 'disprove' a case without any knowledge of it. As you're the one that raised it as a topic for discussion, I think the onus is really on you to provide a link to where you heard about it so we can all judge for ourselves. 
    And also, from TV licencing's own wesite: QUOTE:

    Is a TV Licence required for listening to digital radio broadcasts?

    A TV Licence is required to watch or record TV programmes as they are being shown on TV, regardless of the channel and device being used (e.g. TV, computer, laptop, mobile phone, game console, digital box or DVD/VHS recorder), and how it is receive (terrestrial, satellite, cable, via the internet or any other way). You do not need a TV Licence if you only use this equipment to listen to digital radio broadcasts
    UNQUOTE
    www.tvlicensing.co.u...

    Very poorly worded, but that is Capita for yousmiley - winkeye

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Lee (U1149673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    Thanks for the information. I'm still a little curious about the test case you mentioned. Given that TV Licensing clearly state on their own website that you don't need a TV Licence if you only use your equipment to listen to digital radio broadcasts, why would they then attempt to prosecute someone for doing precisely that? Do you have any further details about this case?

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Cyril-Furr (U10382673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    Thanks for the information. I'm still a little curious about the test case you mentioned. Given that TV Licensing clearly state on their own website that you don't need a TV Licence if you only use your equipment to listen to digital radio broadcasts, why would they then attempt to prosecute someone for doing precisely that? Do you have any further details about this case?  Sorry, a slip of the poor old grey matter - as you can see, it is 100% legal to use ANY equipment for Radio use (even if it has a screen) without a TV licence - provided that is all it is used for - many people, including yourself it seems, are not aware of that important piece of information, Capita hide it away deep in their website, it is obvious they would rather not tell the general public the truth.

    In these difficult financial times, it is important that everyone is in full posession of their rights & facts about the law.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    But how do you prove you are only using it for radio when it could be used for TV too? I don't understand how this works.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Lee (U1149673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    many people, including yourself it seems, are not aware of that important piece of information, Capita hide it away deep in their website, it is obvious they would rather not tell the general public the truth.  
    Well, it's found under the heading "Is a TV Licence required for listening to digital radio broadcasts?", so it's not exactly hidden away deep. Anyone visiting the website can simply type words like "radio" into the search box and it'll come straight up.

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    What I don't get is that people would shell out for equipment to receive digital broadcasts through the tv -but only listen to radio

    Just does not sound at all likely.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Cyril-Furr (U10382673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    What I don't get is that people would shell out for equipment to receive digital broadcasts through the tv -but only listen to radio

    Just does not sound at all likely. 
    I have explained once, not everyone lives in cities with signals galore, some people for example live in the welsh valleys, where Sky or freesat at 28.2 is the only option to get a radio signal at a decent signal level.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Cyril-Furr (U10382673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    many people, including yourself it seems, are not aware of that important piece of information, Capita hide it away deep in their website, it is obvious they would rather not tell the general public the truth.  
    Well, it's found under the heading "Is a TV Licence required for listening to digital radio broadcasts?", so it's not exactly hidden away deep. Anyone visiting the website can simply type words like "radio" into the search box and it'll come straight up. 
    Well you asked me to provide proof of the facts - you could not find them LEE, until I pointed you in the correct direction.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Cyril-Furr (U10382673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    But how do you prove you are only using it for radio when it could be used for TV too? I don't understand how this works.  Because you are innocent, until proven guilty in the UK.

    It is a bit like saying "I am a farmer I have a gun for shooting rats, not for shooting humans, so can I have my shotgun licence please"

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    Sorry, but where is the test case info please?

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    I don't like your comparison but will rephrase my question. How do the BBC know you are only using your TV equipment for radio, millions could claim the same thing, so how much would the BBC have to spend checking on everyone who claimed to be doing so?

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    What I don't get is that people would shell out for equipment to receive digital broadcasts through the tv -but only listen to radio

    Just does not sound at all likely. 
    I have explained once, not everyone lives in cities with signals galore, some people for example live in the welsh valleys, where Sky or freesat at 28.2 is the only option to get a radio signal at a decent signal level. 
    So are you saying fm and medium and long wave are also not available in those areas -so people actually need satellite equipment to receive a radio signal??

    If so-then l still don't see people NOT watching tv- just not likely is it??

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Fedster (U14967576) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    Just on another point, listening to Radio via TV is obviously Radio because you have no pictures, however what if you are watching 5live through your TV via the 5live live Video feature www.bbc.co.uk/5live/....

    Is that watching TV?

    Or watching Radio?

    Imo its watching TV, so will need a license, its impossible to watch Radio,if you are watching something its TV?

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Lee (U1149673) on Saturday, 15th June 2013

    Well you asked me to provide proof of the facts - you could not find them LEE, until I pointed you in the correct direction.  
    No, I didn't ask you to "prove the facts". I wasn't asking for the TV Licensing regulations, it was details of the "test case" you mentioned that I was asking for. If you recall, you had challenged people to disprove the case, so I requested more information about it.

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by tumteatum (U15488526) on Sunday, 16th June 2013

    Thanks to everyone for responding.

    So we can use our tv but not watch any programmes. The burden of proof would be on TVL to prove otherwise. However, my word the hassle and aggravation. I have read some horror stories about people being harrassed by TVL as they cannot believe anyone wouldn't hold a full licence in this day and age. We would want to avoid all of that. Having said that an acquaintance got rid of their tv and never had any problems.

    I searched for the "test case" mentioned above. I am assuming that the poster was referring to a case last September in Dover Mags Court where the individual concerned was using his TV to listen to the radio. I wouldn't call it a test case on listening to the radio but it does highlight how things can escalate with enforcement action. Unfortunately its an unreported case but is commented on in various blogs etc. I won't post any links in case it fails moderation.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Sunday, 16th June 2013

    I remember, many years ago, the "adverts" on the TV showing those TV signal detector vans and the men in the van checking the addresses against a computer printout of who did or didn't have a licence.

    I wonder if they could make more of the "adverts" saying, we can tell if you are watching or only listening to your TV.

    smiley - biggrin

    https://www.google....

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Sue_Aitch (U3336990) on Sunday, 16th June 2013

    Freeview Set Top Box - - sell the TV! - attached to your Hi-Fi would do the trick.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by verityesque (U13912917) on Sunday, 16th June 2013

    Apologies if someone has asked about this before.

    Like most households we are having to cut back. It has occurred to us that apart from a very short list of programmes we are spending more time listening to the radio than watching tv. Also, we've talked about how we waste our evenings staring at the screen completely disengaged with what's available - so we want to use our time more productively.

    It used to be that you needed a licence for radios but that no longer applies. However, we listen to the radio through our tv, it has far better sound than our dab radios.

    I understand that our argument for not having a tv licence because we only listen to the radio on it will not go far with tv licensing - a bit like, "I only watch ITV".

    However, does anyone know if it is possible to block receiving tv programmes but keep radio? or on we on a hiding to nothing?

    Thank you 
    You have a computer,all radio stations you can get through freeview are available online,plus many more.
    Ditch the freeview,cancel your license & listen on line like i do.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by tumteatum (U15488526) on Sunday, 16th June 2013

    Thanks, the problem isn't accessing station in my area it's getting the best sound. The only decent speakers we have are through our tv and regardless of what the law states, I'd like to avoid any arguments with TVL enforcement.

    We currently have a sky plus box (Freeview in our area was never very good). We are in the process of cancelling our Sky but someone has told us that even if we connect the box to a hi fi (so no pictures) we could still get in to trouble as the box is a recording device (even though we'd lose that facility when we cancel).

    I just wish there was a way to just disable receiving all tv programmes so there is no ambiguity. However, as thedogcody (i think) mentioned above, it's not possible.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by EggOnAStilt (U7111730) on Sunday, 16th June 2013

    as the box is a recording device (even though we'd lose that facility when we cancel) 
    Indeed it would still need a licence especially if it defaults to a freesat service.

    The other thing of course is, why spend all that money firing up a TV for just a radio service? The money you'd save on electricity would probably pay for some nice new fancy radio equipment over a couple of years.

    smiley - friedegg

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by tumteatum (U15488526) on Sunday, 16th June 2013

    Good point, didn't even think about the electricity. Although a relative did mention the "problem" raised by Joey in a Friends episode .... "What's your furniture going to point at?"

    I do wonder how long we will last after the novelty wears off and especially when the nights pull in. 13p a day plus might seem worthwhile.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by EggOnAStilt (U7111730) on Sunday, 16th June 2013

    Good point, didn't even think about the electricity. Although a relative did mention the "problem" raised by Joey in a Friends episode .... "What's your furniture going to point at?"

    I do wonder how long we will last after the novelty wears off and especially when the nights pull in. 13p a day plus might seem worthwhile. 
    I would buy a radio with a separate sound system that plugs into your TV too. Keep the satellite dish where it is.
    Unplug the TV and sat receiver and send them off to a friends for safe keeping.

    If you decide to go back to TV but don't want to go down the Sky/subscription type of service, you could get a cheap freesat box or freesat pvr, which should utilise the old dish, just screw the cable into the box.
    You then could add the sound system into your TV and you shouldn't feel like you have wasted money.
    If your internet is up to it, a cheap cable (and I do mean cheap if you buy online) from computer to TV, should also give you the current crop of "iPlayers" bearing in mind not everything is on the "iPlayers" hence the suggestion for a freesat service as well.

    <friedegg.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 28.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

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