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Ding Dong Charts BBC Dictatorship

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 102
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Danny hutton (U15693324) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    How dare the BBC refuse to play Ding Dong the witch is dead in the charts. regardless of whether its in bad taste its the public who pay the TV licence, so if the public vote for a song they want they should be given it. I personally have not downloaded it and would not vote it into the charts but this is not a BBC dictatorship.

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    Would you hold the same view if it was your mother they were referring to.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by stirling (U13732738) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    The track would have been played on BBC radio. That fact will give the mods an excuse to close this thread.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by jodie (U14366548) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    There's a grieving family who havent buried their loved one yet , why dont you go up the family & mock them in their faces ?
    The bbc have comprimised & that's good enough.
    I dont know what happened to turn the other cheek or restraint.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    It will be closed. In the outside world the bbc is being viewed with incredulity.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 2.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by GARGLEBLASTER (U3191065) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    What has this got to do with a BBC TV programme?

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    Hitler was someones family, whether they are family or not it does not exempt them from others opinions.  I notice you don't answer the question I asked.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by BBC auto-messages (U294) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    Editorial Note: This conversation has been moved from 'BBC Television programmes' to 'The BBC'.

    Not about a TV Programme. Moving to general BBC.

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Danny hutton (U15693324) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    The top 40 Charts? Is that not a programme on the BBC? think before you speak.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by keepingup (U15693343) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    people will be divided in opinion. why should everyone who disliked MT be discriminated against by not being able to show there emotions through a song.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    I think what the BBC are planning is a good compromise.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Danny hutton (U15693324) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    Hitler was someones family, whether they are family or not it does not exempt them from others opinions.  I notice you don't answer the question I asked.  Of course I would, But regardless I cant account for others opinions. Freedom of Speech? I assume your not a fan of this?

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    I am a fan of compromise. Part of the song will be played but put into context. That seems good enough to me.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    Phil,
    I bet you love fudge, too!

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by AmosBurke (U8229185) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    Auntie has a long history of banning songs. The very long list includes "Mack The Knife" by Louis Armstrong and "Love For Sale" by Ella Fitzgerald. Yes, both Kurt Weill and Cole Porter were considered too strong!

    Who of thought it; Judy Garland causing offense? People should grow up.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    Phil,
    I bet you love fudge, too! 
    A fudge would be an unsatisfactory compromise which this isn't IMO. It is not as though the song is having a reduced airing due to its content but due to the context which will be fully explained.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Walrus (U2154212) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    The song does seem an extreme response in the present circumstances but Lady Thatcher was neither loved nor respected by folk who suffered her direct assualt on their lives, homes, families and way of life.
    The politics of the obvious need for change at that time,imv, should never have included the destruction of our own folk by their own government. Other ways of change should have been sought.
    Lady Thatcher, by her own words and pronouncements utterly believed in confrontational politics and an inflexibility of approach even amongst her own party. 'Wets'? She was a deviceful person.
    It should therefore have come as no suprise that she was not loved by all nor will be missed by all.
    To my mind, this song is a pithy, harmless and witty way for such folk to bid their farewells albeit not fond enough by those who never suffered.
    The rights and wrongs of the period will be debated for years to come and, imv, we shall all be found wanting - aye, including those who now 'ding' the 'dong'.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    To celebrate anyone's death does not show those that celebrate it in the best possible light. The worst aspect of it is that it achieves nothing apart from hurting the family of the dead person.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Walrus (U2154212) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    To celebrate anyone's death does not show those that celebrate it in the best possible light. The worst aspect of it is that it achieves nothing apart from hurting the family of the dead person.  We are speaking here of a very public life; a life which deliberately set out to destroy others.
    The family took on the mantle of the mother. The son organised his mother's speech tours spreading her philosophy. Neither son nor daughter publically denied their mother. On the contary.
    They must therefore share the torrent of feeling her death unleashed.Well, imv.

    Speaking ill of the dead is one consequence of becoming a politician, a natural one when positioning the departed for posterity and history.

    I don't know about you, but I am amazed at the blaze caused by raking over the ashes of the time. Passions must have been white hot for them still to smoulder.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    To celebrate anyone's death does not show those that celebrate it in the best possible light. The worst aspect of it is that it achieves nothing apart from hurting the family of the dead person.  We are speaking here of a very public life; a life which deliberately set out to destroy others.
    The family took on the mantle of the mother. The son organised his mother's speech tours spreading her philosophy. Neither son nor daughter publically denied their mother. On the contary.
    They must therefore share the torrent of feeling her death unleashed.Well, imv.

    Speaking ill of the dead is one consequence of becoming a politician, a natural one when positioning the departed for posterity and history.

    I don't know about you, but I am amazed at the blaze caused by raking over the ashes of the time. Passions must have been white hot for them still to smoulder. 
    Oh I see its a deliberate attack on the family. It certainly will not have any affect on Margaret Thatcher.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by hemsby1 (U5377337) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    For once I totaly agree with the BBC on this one.Why should a stupid little campaign on-line get any more exposure I saw the woman behind all this,put it this way it did not surprise me looking at her.As for the morons dancing in the street half of them were not even alive when Thatcher was PM and the other are most likely not on the electoral roll.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Annie-Lou (U4502268) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    How dare the BBC refuse to play Ding Dong the witch is dead in the charts. regardless of whether its in bad taste its the public who pay the TV licence, so if the public vote for a song they want they should be given it. I personally have not downloaded it and would not vote it into the charts but this is not a BBC dictatorship.   It is not "the public" voting for this. It is a loud-mouthed small minority, nearly all of whom are far to young to remember the 1980s (Lets face it, folks who can actually remember a Thatcher government don't generally "download" songs!). It is just another handy excuse to kick out at authority.

    I was never a fan of Maggie, but I can't help feeling she's be secretly flattered by all this fuss. After all, no furore like this is going to happen when John Major shuffles off this mortal coil, is it??

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    We are speaking here of a very public life; a life which deliberately set out to destroy others.  I have tried to stay out of this debate but I can not ignore this unbelievable statement.

    Give me ONE shred of evidence to back up this nonsense.




    I support the BBC on this compromise on this issue.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Annie-Lou (U4502268) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    You call this "dictatorship" but I've been struck by the fact that its those who shout loudest about freedom who seem least willing to accept the democratic decisions of the majority of their fellow Britons.

    Incidentally, watching those young persons parroting lines about "she killed the coal mining communities", my first thought was "i wonder how many of them have also been on demos against coal-fired power stations??"

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 24.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Fat_Rascal (U14765669) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    I am not at all in agreement with playing this record - love the lady or hate her she served this country with all her heart for most of her life - this is no way to repay that. I wonder what effort some of the people who are celebrating her death have made to make this a better country? Well done to some of the Welsh coal miners who gave some very dignified and gracious responses to Mrs Thatcher's death.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 1.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Radioactiveoldduffer (U4768882) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    You call this "dictatorship" but I've been struck by the fact that its those who shout loudest about freedom who seem least willing to accept the democratic decisions of the majority of their fellow Britons.

    Incidentally, watching those young persons parroting lines about "she killed the coal mining communities", my first thought was "i wonder how many of them have also been on demos against coal-fired power stations??" 
    It's a matter of fact that the Labour government under Wilson closed over a hundred more coal mines than Thatcher but that would be an inconvenient fact to those who are plainly ignorant of history.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 20.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    people will be divided in opinion. why should everyone who disliked MT be discriminated against by not being able to show there emotions through a song.  Why should not the BBC play "I love Mrs Thatcher" when it enters the top 10?

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    Agree - a large number of unbelievable statements. Watching a programme on MRs T at the moment on an alternative channel. Detailed, balanced and it is using the puppets from "Spitting Image" . Strikes me that those spouting nonsense at the moment have no sense of history, no perspective and absolutely no sense of humour.

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by DVDfever (U14652954) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    Phil,
    I bet you love fudge, too! 
    A fudge would be an unsatisfactory compromise which this isn't IMO. It is not as though the song is having a reduced airing due to its content but due to the context which will be fully explained. 
    The context doesn't need to be explained. You'd have to have been living under a rock all week not to know why it's in the charts.

    Ben Cooper's decision is ridiculously heavy-handed and reminds me of the time Lorraine Heggessey embarrassed herself by walking onto the set of Blue Peter to explain to children why Richard Bacon was sacked.

    Ben Cooper says they’re going to have a Newsbeat report with “4-5 seconds of the song” (which 4-5 seconds, they won’t say, but I’ll bet it doesn’t include the title), when, as the song is inoffensive, they shouldn’t give any comment as to why it’s there, and simply say, “And at No.1, it’s Ding Dong The Witch is Dead, from The Wizard of Oz”. Play the song, then 51 seconds later it’ll be done and they’ll never have to play it again.

    And as for Ben Cooper, how old is he? He’s in charge of a radio station listened to, in the majority, by teenagers, yet he looks about 50. He is clearly out of touch and the wrong man for the job.

    As for Thacher, she killed jobs, she killed prosperity and she killed social housing. Her actions resulted in the deaths of less people than Tony Blair but she gave everyone a false impression of aspiration. Had she been in power in 2003, she’d have joined in with the US and helped kill hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians. All politicians only serve to feather their own nest. They’re all as bad as each other. And a Baroness or Lord can’t be a man or woman of the people.

    Some people hate her, while others didn’t like her. The song should be played, without comment. If it’s No.1 on Sunday, it won’t be No.1 next week, it’ll be at the bottom end of the Top 40 if it’s still in there at all, and there won’t be any requirement to play it.

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    Some people hate her, while others didn’t like her  You forgot to mention those of us who thought she was great.

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    I think that anyone less than 50 would be out of touch with the situation of this country in the 1970s which she had to deal with. Teenagers today wouldn't have a clue of what life was like then.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    I think that anyone less than 50 would be out of touch with the situation of this country in the 1970s which she had to deal with. Teenagers today wouldn't have a clue of what life was like then.  Yes indeed, to say that she "put people out of work" only looks at the small picture and not the big one.

    What she did was to rationalise bloated industries to make them competitive, thus SAVING everyone from losing their jobs in those fields.





    I suppose there is a theory that by refusing to play "Ding Dong.." in full the BBC are creating a bigger issue of this than if they just played it but I still think that this campagn is in VERY poor taste and brings a degree of shame to the UK.

    I feel sure that other countries will be viewing all this with dismay (as am I to be honest).

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Saturday, 13th April 2013

    "a false impression of aspiration" ????

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 34.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Walrus (U2154212) on Sunday, 14th April 2013

    To celebrate anyone's death does not show those that celebrate it in the best possible light. The worst aspect of it is that it achieves nothing apart from hurting the family of the dead person.  We are speaking here of a very public life; a life which deliberately set out to destroy others.
    The family took on the mantle of the mother. The son organised his mother's speech tours spreading her philosophy. Neither son nor daughter publically denied their mother. On the contary.
    They must therefore share the torrent of feeling her death unleashed.Well, imv.

    Speaking ill of the dead is one consequence of becoming a politician, a natural one when positioning the departed for posterity and history.

    I don't know about you, but I am amazed at the blaze caused by raking over the ashes of the time. Passions must have been white hot for them still to smoulder. 
    Oh I see its a deliberate attack on the family. It certainly will not have any affect on Margaret Thatcher. 
    I don't follow your reasoning, but then I am rather stupid more often than not.

    One could argue the same for the quasi-state funeral. I suppose that is for the family for Lady T will certainly not be present in spirit.

    I'm not prepared to debate the point. Take my view as you wish.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Walrus (U2154212) on Sunday, 14th April 2013

    We are speaking here of a very public life; a life which deliberately set out to destroy others.  I have tried to stay out of this debate but I can not ignore this unbelievable statement.

    Give me ONE shred of evidence to back up this nonsense.




    I support the BBC on this compromise on this issue. 
    "Seek and ye shall find."

    Best to stay out of the debate as you originally decided. I can see neither of us agreeing considering our stand points.

    "You in your small corner; and I in mine."

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Nostromo (U14572491) on Sunday, 14th April 2013

    Does this mean that the BBC are going to censor The Wizard of Oz every time its on TV? Ding Dong now has its place in history as a song celebrating Thatcher's death; its bound to upset the DM people in the future.

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Sunday, 14th April 2013

    History is very long and every generation rewrites it to fit into their own image. That is what is happening at the moment. Many people who have no first hand knowledge of the past are at the forefront of the current campaign. As to the song having its place in history - lets wait and see. On your basis the song, "I love Margaret Thatcher" - currently at number 6 in the charts will also be going down in history.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by me (U14258191) on Sunday, 14th April 2013

    Who will be watching the great meteor shower on April 22?

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Bananas are the best (U15650112) on Sunday, 14th April 2013

    Of course not. Though I do have to say that I wouldn't mind NOT seeing the film again; I never really liked it.

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Sunday, 14th April 2013

    To celebrate anyone's death does not show those that celebrate it in the best possible light. The worst aspect of it is that it achieves nothing apart from hurting the family of the dead person.  We are speaking here of a very public life; a life which deliberately set out to destroy others.
    The family took on the mantle of the mother. The son organised his mother's speech tours spreading her philosophy. Neither son nor daughter publically denied their mother. On the contary.
    They must therefore share the torrent of feeling her death unleashed.Well, imv.

    Speaking ill of the dead is one consequence of becoming a politician, a natural one when positioning the departed for posterity and history.

    I don't know about you, but I am amazed at the blaze caused by raking over the ashes of the time. Passions must have been white hot for them still to smoulder. 
    Oh I see its a deliberate attack on the family. It certainly will not have any affect on Margaret Thatcher. 
    I don't follow your reasoning, but then I am rather stupid more often than not.

    One could argue the same for the quasi-state funeral. I suppose that is for the family for Lady T will certainly not be present in spirit.

    I'm not prepared to debate the point. Take my view as you wish.

     
    You seem to think that the family is fair game but what have they ever done to you.

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 35.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Vox_Populi (U3226170) on Sunday, 14th April 2013

    Who will be watching the great meteor shower on April 22?
     
    OMG! we are all doomed, here come the triffids.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Red Yo-Ho-Ho-Horizon (U1719289) on Sunday, 14th April 2013

    How dare the BBC refuse to play Ding Dong the witch is dead in the charts. regardless of whether its in bad taste its the public who pay the TV licence, so if the public vote for a song they want they should be given it. I personally have not downloaded it and would not vote it into the charts but this is not a BBC dictatorship.   And, some of the self-same public who also pay the TV licence find the song objectionable in this context.

    There is only one place 'Ding Dong...' should be played, and, that should be in 'The Wizard of Oz' for which the song was intended!

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Andy (U14048329) on Monday, 15th April 2013

    You call this "dictatorship" but I've been struck by the fact that its those who shout loudest about freedom who seem least willing to accept the democratic decisions of the majority of their fellow Britons.

    Incidentally, watching those young persons parroting lines about "she killed the coal mining communities", my first thought was "i wonder how many of them have also been on demos against coal-fired power stations??" 
    MT never was supported by a "majority of her fellow Britons".

    Anyway...who was it who decided that any available song could get into the singles charts if got enough downloads, without actually being released as a single? It is that decision which has set up this scenario - it's not the first and won't be the last time it happens.

    Report message50

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