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Is the BBC becoming anti British?

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Messages: 1 - 26 of 26
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by triffictrev (U15632181) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I am not a flag waving patriot and have no sudden urges to rush out to rescue (or meddle) into the affairs of former British colonies nor demand immediate repatriation of all foreigners, but am I the only person who is seeing increasing grovelling by BBC TV presenters to all things US? When the first letter of BBC stands for British and we, the British licence payers, fund you with our taxes, would you please start being a lot more pro-British.

    Whenever there is an unknown American on Breakfast Time, getting in reality free advertising to plug their record/book/film/talk or other product, why does the BBC grovel to these uninspiring non-entities? This blatant kowtowing to all things US is not merely cringeworthy, it is embarassing and, I find, increasingly anti-British.

    You are British, funded by British people and should do more to promote Britain and its many diverse views and people. I find the now everyday supine attitude to all things American appalling. What do other viewers things?

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Justnow (U2498091) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I cant say that I have noticed this - give us some examples!

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I don't agree.
    I think the BBC is increasing in thrall to celebrity culture; and a lot of that originates in the US.
    But I don't think it's anti-British to acknowledge the powerful role the US plays on the world stage. We might not like it, especially as the UK's influence is waning - but we can't pretend it's not the case.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 28th February 2013


    I'm going to move this discussion to the About the BBC topic in a short while, as it's not about a specific programme.

    It will be moved here.

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    Or if you've posted to the discussion, click on your name to see all the discussions that you have contributed to, and find it that way.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I am not a flag waving patriot and have no sudden urges to rush out to rescue (or meddle) into the affairs of former British colonies nor demand immediate repatriation of all foreigners, but am I the only person who is seeing increasing grovelling by BBC TV presenters to all things US? When the first letter of BBC stands for British and we, the British licence payers, fund you with our taxes, would you please start being a lot more pro-British.

    Whenever there is an unknown American on Breakfast Time, getting in reality free advertising to plug their record/book/film/talk or other product, why does the BBC grovel to these uninspiring non-entities? This blatant kowtowing to all things US is not merely cringeworthy, it is embarassing and, I find, increasingly anti-British.

    You are British, funded by British people and should do more to promote Britain and its many diverse views and people. I find the now everyday supine attitude to all things American appalling. What do other viewers things? 

    Hi triffictrev,


    Americans appear on many British TV programmes, because they speak the same basic language as us. That makes them suitable guests too have on a programme. People from other countries also appear, if they're fluent in the language and can be interviewed.

    The American guests are treated no differently to the British guests, or the guests from any other country.

    I don't think it's 'anti-British' to be polite to guests on programmes.


    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by BBC auto-messages (U294) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Editorial Note: This conversation has been moved from 'BBC Television programmes' to 'The BBC'.


    Not about a specific programme, so moving to the general BBC section.

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by QE (U15612083) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I think it's more accurate to say that the BBC is anti-politician, especially British and American politicians.

    'Celebs' and sports 'personalities' of any nationality, on the other hand, are treated with unreserved deference especially if they have something to advertise. This is epitomised by the way "English" football managers appear after every match muttering incomprehensible clichés, usually in a strong Italian accent, in front of a huge advertising hoarding.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I wouldn't describe the BBC as anti-British, just obsessed with all things American.
    American news stories are given huge prominenece compared with the rest of the world.

    Compare and contrast the blanket coverage of the Primaries and the Presidential elections, with the occasional mention of elections in Europe.

    Compare the weeks coverage of the East Coast storm, with hardly a mention of a coincident one in the Far East that was as severe and caused a much greater loss of life.

    Of late it seems that many documentaries and drama are aimed at the Transatlantic market rather than made with the domestic consumer in mind.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Myles4291 (U14634500) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    I don't think the BBC is anti-British...but as someone who is not particularly pro America (the Obamas aside)...I get tired of the UK medias obsession with the States...plus Americans being cast in UK shows...another bug bare of mine. I know why it is done...to increase sales to the American markets.

    My one request though is this...that when BBC reporters report US stories...please avoid using Americanisms. Recently, we had coverage of the terrible shootings out there. The gunman was referred to as 'The Shooter'! Please...we are UK citizens...and in the UK we refer to gunman. That is GUNMAN not SHOOTER.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    ...and in the UK we refer to gunman. That is GUNMAN not SHOOTER.  I'm ok with 'shooter' - it's less sexist.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 28th February 2013


    In reply to Myles4291:
    I get tired of plus Americans being cast in UK shows...another bug bare of mine. I know why it is done...to increase sales to the American markets.
     


    This makes me laugh and roll my eyes every time I see it.

    Like us yanks are sitting around saying "I had absolutely no interest in watching Downton Abbey, but hey, once I heard through the grapevine that there was some b-list American actress in it I put it on my must watch list."

    I suppose there are a lot of British actors in American shows because it will be more likely to make Britons want to watch?

    There would be no UK interest in "The Following" for example if another actor had been cast instead of James Purefoy?

    There would be no UK interest in "Homeland" had Damian Lewis and David Harewood not been cast?

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Valdimar the Unending (U15551013) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Recorded in 1226 in relation to Shooter's Hill (Royal Borough of Greenwich), taking its name form the practice of archery.

    My one request though is this...that when BBC reporters report US stories...please avoid using Americanisms. Recently, we had coverage of the terrible shootings out there. The gunman was referred to as 'The Shooter'! Please...we are UK citizens...and in the UK we refer to gunman. That is GUNMAN not SHOOTER. 

    It is in Pepys' Diaries (at least one of them). It is mentioned by Byron, Dickens, Wells, Stoker, Carlyle and not a hint of the Americas in sight.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Myles4291 (U14634500) on Thursday, 28th February 2013


    In reply to Myles4291:
    I get tired of plus Americans being cast in UK shows...another bug bare of mine. I know why it is done...to increase sales to the American markets.
     


    This makes me laugh and roll my eyes every time I see it.

    Like us yanks are sitting around saying "I had absolutely no interest in watching Downton Abbey, but hey, once I heard through the grapevine that there was some b-list American actress in it I put it on my must watch list."

    I suppose there are a lot of British actors in American shows because it will be more likely to make Britons want to watch?

    There would be no UK interest in "The Following" for example if another actor had been cast instead of James Purefoy?

    There would be no UK interest in "Homeland" had Damian Lewis and David Harewood not been cast?

     
    You can make sarcastic comments...that is fine...but I think I make a valid point. Why was Torchwood 'Americanized' do you think? To appeal to the American markets...why else. Why do you think John Barrowman (a Scot with an American accent) was cast in Torchwood? I believe to try to appeal to British and American audiences.

    As a Brit, I want to see British performers on British programming...especially on the BBC.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 28th February 2013


    Why was Torchwood 'Americanized' do you think? To appeal to the American markets...why else.
     


    I dont know. The Starz network is just getting into making original programming. Its a relatively small, small cable network. But Torchwood Miracle Day was a failure in every conceivable way if I recall.


    Why do you think John Barrowman (a Scot with an American accent) was cast in Torchwood? I believe to try to appeal to British and American audiences.
     


    I believe he was cast in Torchwood as a carry over to his character having appeared in Doctor Who.


    As a Brit, I want to see British performers on British programming...especially on the BBC.
     


    Yes, you seem very jingoistic in your casting preferences. Which is fine. But that doesnt mean others share this same "I only want to see my own people" feelings about casting decisions.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    By the way, about the Starz network. One of their original programmes that was fantastic was "Boss" with Kelsey Grammer.

    It had a British Actress - Hannah Ware in the cast.

    Do you reckon this was to appeal the UK audience or because they felt she rated out as the best actress for the part after the casting calls?

    It also starred Danish actress Connie Neilsen. Do you suppose this was to make the programme more marketable to the Danes? Or because she is a fabulous actress?

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Valdimar the Unending (U15551013) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Don't think that American television goes in for that, otherwise you would see them cast somebody British in leading roles in major television programs like 'House', for example smiley - winkeye.

    I have found that one of the reasons you find Americans in British productions is that they are British co-productions. However, when Lee Remick was cast as Jennie Jerome in 1974, I felt it was inspired casting by the BBC; as was the later casting of Joe Don Baker in 'Edge of Darkness' and of course, we should not forget Gillian Anderson in Bleak House. These three brought something very positive to the roles they played, two playing Americans, and one playing someone British. It demonstrates the point that we should not restrict ourselves to British Actors, when the right actor for the part is available.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 28th February 2013

    Funny thing about House. The producers of the programme were unfamiliar with Hugh Laurie.

    He was working in Namibia and heard that Fox was casting a medical drama. So he sent in an unsoliticed, home made audition tape, playing the character with an American accent.

    The producers didnt learn he was a Briton until after they had called him in for a follow-up audition.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Valdimar the Unending (U15551013) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Talking of which, from the Casting Factory:

    www.youtube.com/watc...

    So he sent in an unsoliticed, home made audition tape, playing the character with an American accent. 

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Lee (U1149673) ** on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Interestingly, many home-grown adventure series from the 1960s (The Champions, Department S etc) cast at least one American in a lead role in order to encourage American stations to buy the programme. Yet the series that had the most success in America during this period was The Avengers, the most British of all programmes.

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by AmosBurke (U8229185) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    I thought Venus Smith was supposed to be an American. She was one of the leads in the first series of The Avengers in case you don't know.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Valdimar the Unending (U15551013) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Not really:

    www.youtube.com/watc...

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    ...and in the UK we refer to gunman. That is GUNMAN not SHOOTER.  I'm ok with 'shooter' - it's less sexist.   Oh, fgs!

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Sploink (U9993613) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Actually, I wouldn't mind if the BBC got more American programmes, if they are good. So many fine programmes go to Sky - I'd rather the BBC got them

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Valdimar the Unending (U15551013) on Friday, 1st March 2013

    Indeed, if the quality is good enough, get it from anywhere, not just the USA and Scandinavia (and previously Australia).

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Prophet Tenebrae (U5995226) ** on Friday, 1st March 2013

    ...and in the UK we refer to gunman. That is GUNMAN not SHOOTER.  I'm ok with 'shooter' - it's less sexist.   How about "gunbeing"?

    That means we won't need to change it from "gunperson" when robots start murdering us.

    I dont know. The Starz network is just getting into making original programming. Its a relatively small, small cable network. But Torchwood Miracle Day was a failure in every conceivable way if I recall.  
    Yeah, I think Americanisation was really the least of Miracle Day's problems...

    But the BBC might be a little too infatuated with the USA, I'm afraid that's not the same as being anti-British.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Sploink (U9993613) on Wednesday, 6th March 2013

    How about "gunbeing"?

    That means we won't need to change it from "gunperson" when robots start murdering us. 


    I think if we get to the stage where we're being murdered by robots, terminology will be the least of our problems......

    Report message26

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