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Why no music videos on the BBC?

Messages: 1 - 35 of 35
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    I know we have the excellent Later with Jools Holland and it is great to see the bands perform live on that show but why do BBC viewers never get the chance to see some of the amazing pop videos that are made?

    Come on BBC surely there is half an hour a week spare time, on one of your channels, for a music video show.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Good point since TOTP finished there isn't a spot- not on the BBC-but aren't there enough other channels that show music videos 24/7?

    Having just read that people get upset because a certain author has been all over our screens in relation to her new time-wasting "our" licence fee as it is often put-then the same people will be up in arms about "our" licence fee being spent on record promotion

    Allowing for the fact that music videos can be seen elsewhere they may have a case

    Of course the same argument could be extended to BBC radio-I am not agreeing or disagreeing with your point-just saying.

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by The man who sailed around his soul (U5846227) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    If the programme resembled the sort of fodder dished up by digital channels such as The Box or Heat then I think I could live without it. (If you're unfamiliar, think Bling, Beats and Jiggling Bits.)

    Baffles me why so much is still spent on promo videos when there are so few mainstream outlets these days; no TOTP, Chart Show, etc.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Good point since TOTP finished there isn't a spot- not on the BBC-but aren't there enough other channels that show music videos 24/7?  Maybe the BBC should just pack up shop then as the same could be said of all other types of programme.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    It is a niche market-things move on-that is why TOTP finished- others have moved into that territory as they have in sport

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    It is a niche market-things move on-that is why TOTP finished- others have moved into that territory as they have in sport

     
    So the BBC just give up on it because others are doing it?

    Cancel the News channel then, and others.

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    If you say so

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by BothXP (U6274173) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    It's not that the BBC should stop just because others are doing it. It's the fact that the viewing audience dropped through the floor once the 24hr Music TV channels came along: news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/...

    Once the regular viewing figures become low it simply not cost effective from the license fee point of view to continue.

    And since then all the music videos that you could ever want to watch can be streamed or purchased via the internet.

    There are many things that the BBC do in completion with other channels that continue to be popular, such as the BBC news channel.

    TOTP went through sooooo many re-brands and relaunches during those last few years but they could just never get the audience back. So it ended.

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Apparently you can watch the top ten vidoes on-line whilst the new chart is announced on Radio 1, why not just show them on one of the BBC TV channels.

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    When it comes to MTV

    "Video killed the Radio Star"

    but now

    "Reality TV killed the Video Star"

    MTV used to air pretty much nothing but music videos. They had VJs.

    Now they air mostly reality TV shows about pregnant teens, tanned and brainless New Jersey beach bums and guys taking junk cars and fixing them up by fitting them with in-dash recording studios, HD TVs and fish tanks.

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 27th September 2012


    I think the reason might be that the BBC are not encouraged to replicate services that are offered elsewhere.

    Music videos are screened on many music channels and are all over the web, so there might not be seen to be much value in putting them out on the BBC too.



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  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    I do sometimes watch the music channels but I find that there is so much none chart stuff on them that I don't really enjoy most of it (not that I like all chart music you understand)

    They tend to absolutely PLASTER the screen with DOGs scrolling messages etc that the actual video is squeezed up in a tiny box in the corner and you get adverts of course.

    Now if the BBC put on a half hour chart video show, no 'clutter', no adverts, I would watch it.

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    a 30-minute music video programme would feature probably 5 or 6 songs.

    It would be difficult for the BBC to put together any sort of "sampler" that would have any sort of broad appeal with such a short time slot.

    Do they show rap videos? Do they show pop videos? Do they show rock videos? Do they show heavy metal? Do they show adult contemporary videos? Do they mix in an country music or show music? Do they show only current videos or dip into the catalog of videos from the 80s and 90s heyday of videos?

    If they showed one of each genre, people who didnt like rap might tune away as soon as that type of song came on.

    If they concentrated on a different genre every week then it would be difficult to establish a consistent fan base.

    The reason MTV, VH-1 and other music video channels succeeded was because they showed videos 24/7 and could be all things to all people.

    Its hard to get much done in a 30-minute block once a week.

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Do they show rap videos? Do they show pop videos? Do they show rock videos? Do they show heavy metal? Do they show adult contemporary videos? Do they mix in an country music or show music? Do they show only current videos or dip into the catalog of videos from the 80s and 90s heyday of videos?  Just show the top selling music of the week whatever that might be, simples.

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  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Its not that simple TomcatRed.

    Top selling music according to what? Rap charts? Pop charts? Rock charts? Metal charts? Adult contemporary charts?

    And what if these charts show very little variation from week to week? Keeping repeating the same handful of videos week after week?

    And what if the songs in question dont have a video?

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  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    There is only one meaningful 'chart' in this country and the BBC already announce the new one on Radio 1 each Sunday evening.

    I really can't imagine that any top selling song gets to the top without a vidoe being made but if it did then you just meantion it and move on to the next song.

    You really are trying to put problems in the way when there aren't any.

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    There is only one meaningful 'chart' in this country and the BBC already announce the new one on Radio 1 each Sunday evening.

    I really can't imagine that any top selling song gets to the top without a vidoe being made but if it did then you just meantion it and move on to the next song.

    You really are trying to put problems in the way when there aren't any. 
    What other than the fact you're the only one on this discussion keep on the idea?

    You have already said you can watch the videos on-line as the top ten is announced and have been given the case why they are unlikely to be shown on BBCtv and at the moment the support for your cause is zero.

    It is just another one of those programmes that is just on a person's wish list-which we probably all have

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  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 27th September 2012


    posted by TomcatRed
    There is only one meaningful 'chart' in this country
     


    Oh yeah?

    Then I guess the other music charts in the UK only reflect the purchasing habbits of the portion of the music buying public that dont matter.

    And thus the BBC would have no interest in trying to appeal to their TV viewing habbits either.


    posted by TomcatRed
    You really are trying to put problems in the way when there aren't any.
     


    That is how business operates TomcatRed.

    Take any idea to the people in charge of making it happen and they are going to ask you such questions.

    And - in the year 2012 - its virtually impossible to air a once a week, 30 minute video programme that is going to have any sort of broad appeal.

    And if you tried to narrow your focus too much - then you are only going to appeal to a certain cross section of the public.

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  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    You have already said you can watch the videos on-line as the top ten is announced  Yes but that assumes that:-

    1) Your internet speed is good enough to 'stream' live videos.
    2) You don't mind sitting in an office chair rather than an armchair.
    3) You don't mind watching on a small screen rather than a 42" HD plasma TV
    4) You don't mind listening on poor quality speakers rather than your 5.1 surround sound system.
    5) You don't want to record the videos to watch again when you want to.

    at the moment the support for your cause is zero.  Fair enough, I just find it strange that the BBC would not even think about it.

    Like I said they already have Later with Jools Holland and IMHO this programme would be better than that.

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  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    You have already said you can watch the videos on-line as the top ten is announced  Yes but that assumes that:-

    1) Your internet speed is good enough to 'stream' live videos.
    2) You don't mind sitting in an office chair rather than an armchair.
    3) You don't mind watching on a small screen rather than a 42" HD plasma TV
    4) You don't mind listening on poor quality speakers rather than your 5.1 surround sound system.
    5) You don't want to record the videos to watch again when you want to.

    at the moment the support for your cause is zero.  Fair enough, I just find it strange that the BBC would not even think about it.

    Like I said they already have Later with Jools Holland and IMHO this programme would be better than that. 
    Then if you are that confident pitch the idea to the BBC- I am sure there is a procedure for that and let us know what they say.

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 27th September 2012


    posted by TomcatRed

    Like I said they already have Later with Jools Holland and IMHO this programme would be better than that.
     


    Jools Holland's programme is unique in that it features a diverse cross section of musical genres and bands/artists at various mile markers in their career.

    Any given episode of "Later..." might feature a blues legend like Buddy Guy or BB King, a world music band from Ghana, an up and coming acoustic singer song writer, an alternative shoe-gazer band, Metallica, Elvis Costello or Garth Brooks.

    And each act would play several songs - and some be interviewed.

    I dont see how a 30-minute programme featuring 5 videos from the top selling acts on the pop chart that week would be an improvement.

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  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Music is a very personal thing GZ but the thing that puts me off Later.... is the very fact that you have to get through the fading has beens and the world music band from Ghana to get to the top acts that the show does have on from time to time.

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  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Music is a very personal thing GZ but the thing that puts me off Later.... is the very fact that you have to get through the fading has beens and the world music band from Ghana to get to the top acts that the show does have on from time to time.  And all of those things you just mentioned would be the same problem with having a once a week, 30-minute programme that featured only the top selling acts that week - "from the only meaningful chart in the UK".

    Any viewers who dont care for the type of music that is on this "only meaningful chart in the UK" is not going to have any desire to watch the programme.

    Also, by limiting the music to the top 5 or 6 songs from "the only meaningful chart in the UK" any viewer can simply take a quick look at the chart and say "3 of those 5 songs are indentical in positon to last week, I dont want to watch a programme that is 60% of a repeat of the one I saw last week."

    So you may be alienating a portion of your audience that would watch the programme if there were significant amounts of repeats from week to week.

    You opened this thread by asking "Why no music videos on the BBC?" and your own idea for change is to show a 30 minute programme that would feature a total of 5 or 6 videos a week based on the top sellers from the pop charts and the same videos may be repeated for many weeks at a time.

    So that is going from showing no videos at all - to show a few from a very limited pool.

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  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Why are you put "the only meaningful chart in the UK" in commas like that, do you disbelieve me or something?

    The BBC announce how "the" chart is shaping up on a Wednesday and announce how "the" chart has ended up on the Sunday.

    Okay maybe my idea is too fixed but I still find it odd that the radio is crammed full of stations playing almost non stop music and the TV is virtually music free (other than background music that is)

    Rather than yet another repeat of Fools and Horses or whatever, just show some music videos.

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  • Message 25

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    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Just consider this, the BBC spend 20 million pounds buying the rights to the show The Voice and yet if the winner did have a top selling song (which she didn't of course) the video to the song would never be seen on any of its own channels.

    Don't you think that odd?

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  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 27th September 2012


    posted by TomcatRed

    Why are you put "the only meaningful chart in the UK" in commas like that, do you disbelieve me or something?

     


    Its not that I disbelieve you. I was just using quotes so that no one thought that it was I who suggested that there was only one "meaninful chart in the UK"?

    People who like jazz might think that means their musical tastes dont count then. Or people who like adult contemporary. Or show tunes. Or country music. Or heavy metal. Or alternative. Or folk music. Or Latin. Or R&B. Or blues music.

    Chances are none of those genres would appear in the top 5 of a chart that I assume is a pop chart from your description.


    posted by TomcatRed

    radio is crammed full of stations playing almost non stop music and the TV is virtually music free.
     


    As with my earlier examples of MTV and VH-1, they could get away with "themed" music programmes, like "Top 5 Videos of the Week" or blocks of videos that were genre specific.

    They could do this because they were channels dedicated to showing music related programming (in their hey day).

    Now we have other dedicated music channels or sub-channels of MTV and VH-1 that still show music videos - because the parent channel seldom does.

    And with the advancements in cable and satellite TV - these channels are often genre specific.

    It would be difficult for the BBC to accomplish any sort of workable sollution in a 30 minute, once a week programme.

    I can appreciate your feelings about lack of music on terrestrial TV, but TV networks have gone from being buffets that serve all sorts of different food - to being more theme specific.





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  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by BothXP (U6274173) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    The problem is that right now as I type there are 28 channels showing music videos on Sky and that's not including the music channels that are showing reality TV.

    Programme's did used to show the kind of thing your describing, The Chart Show comes to mind but with the advent of Music TV channels and the Internet the viewing figures dropped massively and they were cancelled.

    The official charts company has 15 different music based charts. Then I can count at least another 17 weekly charts. So which one should be used? Popular songs don't necessarily have popular videos.
    I think that's why so many music tv channels survive. There is just such a broad range of music and people don't seem to want to sit through the stuff that they don't like. So a 30 min programme with time for just 5 or 6 videos would really struggle to hold an audience.

    TOTP worked because it was 'the' music program. Once the mass of TV channels arrived music on TV almost became on demand and the weekly TOTP lost relevance.

    Gangnam Style !

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  • Message 28

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    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    The other issue is - one would think that a music programme would be a "family" programme.

    And if you take a look at some of the videos of the songs topping the pop charts - Lady Gaga, Britney Spears, Christina Aguilara, Katy Perry, Beyonce, some of the rap guys that hit it on the pop charts.

    Their videos are often anything but family viewing. Even the edited versions.

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  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    Just consider this, the BBC spend 20 million pounds buying the rights to the show The Voice and yet if the winner did have a top selling song (which she didn't of course) the video to the song would never be seen on any of its own channels.

    Don't you think that odd? 
    Phil-ap can give you a long and detailed explanation of why the BBC should never, under any circumstances, mention the winner of "The Voice" once the programme is over.

    I merely asked previously why they didnt invite her to be a guest on The One Show or Breakfast or Graham Norton. She could promote "The Voice" and perform as well.

    He had a whole list of reasons why its important the BBC does not do that. smiley - laugh

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  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Thursday, 27th September 2012

    The other issue is - one would think that a music programme would be a "family" programme.

    And if you take a look at some of the videos of the songs topping the pop charts - Lady Gaga, Britney Spears, Christina Aguilara, Katy Perry, Beyonce, some of the rap guys that hit it on the pop charts.

    Their videos are often anything but family viewing. Even the edited versions.

     
    I am sure it would have to air after the watershed yes and then it is down to parental control as to who watches what.

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  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Friday, 28th September 2012


    I think the reason might be that the BBC are not encouraged to replicate services that are offered elsewhere.

    Music videos are screened on many music channels and are all over the web, so there might not be seen to be much value in putting them out on the BBC too.



     

    TCR

    As I said earlier, the BBC are not encouraged to replicate services that are offered elsewhere.

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  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Friday, 28th September 2012


    They do however offer some exclusive concerts, which is more in line with the BBC remit.

    www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/...

    Blur and Mumford and sons were the last two on offer...

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  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Andy (U14048329) on Friday, 28th September 2012

    Music videos...? Really....? Have you seen any lately?

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  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by BothXP (U6274173) on Friday, 28th September 2012

    sadly yes : www.bbc.co.uk/news/e...

    smiley - smiley

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  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by TomcatRed (U8418886) on Friday, 28th September 2012

    TCR

    As I said earlier, the BBC are not encouraged to replicate services that are offered elsewhere. 
    Did you say that with a straight face Peta?

    Almost everything the BBC does is "offered elsewhere" and quite a few of the things that the BBC do are direct copies of what other channels have started up and the BBC have followed.

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