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Freesat boxes ?

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Messages: 1 - 34 of 34
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Sunday, 15th June 2008

    Any to recommend ?.


    I heard in a Panasonic shop yesterday that they have decided not to supply theirs.

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Barney McRubble (U12281511) on Sunday, 15th June 2008

    Possibly because Panasonic have just marketed the first widescreen television with a built in Freesat receiver.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by SONYJIM (U1169869) on Sunday, 15th June 2008

    I would go for a PVR box. They maybe more expensive but the facilities available far outstrip the ordinary box.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Sunday, 15th June 2008

    who's supplying freesat pvr boxes ?

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Al (U1158256) on Sunday, 15th June 2008

    Humax will be launching a Freesat DTR "later this year". I have seen reports on the web that this may be next month. Argos, Comet, Currys and John Lewis are selling Freesat products.
    www.freesat.co.uk/in...

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by RayLincs (U5239364) on Sunday, 15th June 2008

    I have recently had Freesat fitted with the Grundig box,not the cheapest but works real well.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by ColonsayCelt (U1053140) on Sunday, 15th June 2008

    The Humax Foxsat HD is the one I would recommend.
    It allows you to add non-freesat channels and the performance on HD has been spectacular for me.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Watersider (U10223627) on Monday, 16th June 2008

    I wonder if anyone could help me? I have Sky+ at present but I am interested in the mention of the Humax Freesat box.

    I have just bought a Humax TV with HDD and Freeview built in for my bedroom, and am very pleased with it. It has just one tuner but that is not really a problem.

    I have Sky+ at present, on my large TV in the lounge and wondered whether I would need a *new* satellite dish installed, or would the current one pick up Freesat?

    I live in sheltered accommodation and would have difficulty in having a different dish installed. The current dish is wired to the individual flats.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Martyn the retired (U1168764) on Monday, 16th June 2008

    Golden Girl

    Ought to be fine. All the BBC digital satellite transmissions are on the Astra 2 suite of satellites and the only basic difference between Freesat and Sky is the fact receivers for each refer to the appropriate EPG (electronic programme guide). So both systems are looking at exactly the same BBC Four (to take one channel).

    There may be a limit on the number of satellite receivers that can be used in a given flat, but that is the only 'problem' that occurs to me.

    regards, Martyn

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Watersider (U10223627) on Monday, 16th June 2008

    Thank you so much for your advice, Martyn.

    I would only want to have HD reception on my main TV anyway, so it doesn't look as though I will hit any problems.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Watersider (U10223627) on Monday, 16th June 2008

    Sorry - I hit 'Post message' when I meant to use Preview - another senior moment!!

    I am really grateful for the advice you have given me.

    I am finding the POV boards to be very useful.

    smiley - ok

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Chris (U1572381) on Sunday, 22nd June 2008

    Just for info:

    The Grundig, Bush and Goodmans SD boxes are all the same box, just in different clothes, made by the Alba group which the above brands are part of.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Cyril-Furr (U10382673) on Wednesday, 25th June 2008

    The Pacific boxes that Asda have at £16 at the moment take some beating.

    Does anyone know if the PVR boxes can record an external input? EG you have a PVR freeview & feed in tha Skybox via the second scart???
    Bob

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Chris (U1572381) on Wednesday, 25th June 2008


    The Pacific boxes that Asda have at £16 at the moment take some beating.

    Does anyone know if the PVR boxes can record an external input? EG you have a PVR freeview & feed in tha Skybox via the second scart???
    Bob
     


    The above is a Freeview box though and not a Freesat box.

    No, Freeview PVRs aren't usually able to record from and external source, as all they do is record the broadcast stream as is, and you simply playback the stream as is.

    DVD/HDD recorders with built-in 'Freeview' tuner will allow you to record from an external source, as these devices take the input be it an external source or the digital or analogue TV channel and encode it whilst 'recording' to DVD-MPEG2.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by analoglover (U12463172) on Thursday, 26th June 2008

    Hi
    Hope you don't mind me joining in?
    I am thinking of going the Freesat method of digital, if I get a set top box and latter want a freesat PVR, will I be able to run both of the one dish? or will I need two feeds coming into the house?
    That is of course after I get a new HD ready TV

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Chris (U1572381) on Friday, 27th June 2008


    Hi
    Hope you don't mind me joining in?
    I am thinking of going the Freesat method of digital, if I get a set top box and latter want a freesat PVR, will I be able to run both of the one dish? or will I need two feeds coming into the house?
    That is of course after I get a new HD ready TV
     


    You will be able to run them both off one dish, however the LNB on the arm on the dish needs to be a Quad or Octo LNB, as the Freesat HD box will take one feed from the dish and the Freesat PVR will take two feeds from the dish - 3 feeds coming in from the one dish.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Cyril-Furr (U10382673) on Sunday, 29th June 2008

    Thanks for that info BOXTECH, I live & learn!
    I picked up a cheapo box from bigpockets for about £45 inc P&P.....more for the 160GB HDD, wich I swapped out with a 40GB HDD, this still gives about 26 hours of recording time - more than enough for me & the 160GB is now in a computer I am building.....
    Bob

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by analoglover (U12463172) on Tuesday, 1st July 2008

    Thanks BexTech
    I was hoping the answer would be one feed from the dish with some equivelent form of RF loop through (HDMI loop maybe??) But why two to the PVR? Twin tuners perhaps?

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by BeatlesGuru (U2624954) on Tuesday, 1st July 2008

    What a farce, and possibly a con, it all has become. I am certain that quite a few years ago (when digital was first announced) we were promised that by going digital with Freeview with a HD ready set we would be ready for High Definition programmes.

    I now have an integrated digital television and HD ready, so therefore I expect to see the benefits of programmes made in HD. Without paying out any more money.

    It strikes me that the BBC are becoming more and more like the private sector, and less and less like the publicly accountable public sector broadcasting corporation that we had come to know and love (tongue in cheek on the word love).

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Chris (U1572381) on Tuesday, 1st July 2008


    What a farce, and possibly a con, it all has become. I am certain that quite a few years ago (when digital was first announced) we were promised that by going digital with Freeview with a HD ready set we would be ready for High Definition programmes.

    I now have an integrated digital television and HD ready, so therefore I expect to see the benefits of programmes made in HD. Without paying out any more money.

    It strikes me that the BBC are becoming more and more like the private sector, and less and less like the publicly accountable public sector broadcasting corporation that we had come to know and love (tongue in cheek on the word love).
     


    No that was never promised.

    You have a HD Ready TV, that means it's capable of displaying HD pictures.

    Freeview was perceived as SD with later when technology allows moving to HD.

    The technology on DTT (Which Freeview broadcasts over) is DVB-T HD will require DTT to use DVB-T2.

    If you want to watch HD on Freeview then you will need a DVB-T2 Freeview box or TV with DVB-T2 tuner , these will come available to the mass market at some point.

    Your HD Ready TV will allow you to watch Freeview SD, analogue TV and HD via an external source - a HD Freeview box (when they become available) HD satellite or HD cable.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Chris (U1572381) on Tuesday, 1st July 2008


    Thanks BexTech
    I was hoping the answer would be one feed from the dish with some equivalent form of RF loop through (HDMI loop maybe??) But why two to the PVR? Twin tuners perhaps?
     


    Channels on satellite transmit either horizontally or vertically, the LNB on the dish has to be powered, one voltage switches the LNB to receive in horizontal mode a different voltage vertical mode.

    This therefore means half the channels are horizontal and half are vertical.

    Some satellite boxes allow loop-through, but this means when one box is switched to standby the signal can then pass to the other.

    If you were to have several boxes on one feed and you wanted to watch channels on different polarity then the boxes would fight with each other, plus you'd been feeding two voltages to the LNB and it would go bang or could fry one of the satellite receivers.

    A PVR would have two tuners, so you'd need two feeds, so that one feed could have access to all the channels and the other feed could also have access to all the channels.

    HDMI would just get you pictures from the satellite receiver to your TV, not much else you can do with it.

    RF loop through from a box could only work as for feeding the same channel you are watching to other TVs in the house, you couldn't use it to feed separate boxes and get channels from it.

    With Terrestrial TV the channels coming through are only one polarisation and there is no voltage required to power the aerial and switched polarity, hence you can split the incoming signal and share the one feed (though may need a decent AMP).

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by analoglover (U12463172) on Monday, 7th July 2008

    Phew! And I thought I asked a simple question about signal feeds from the dish.
    Thanks for explaining it in a language even an old fogie like me understood.
    Went to my local Currys to order a system and ended up walking out in disgust.
    I would have got more sense from the cashier at Argos.
    It also meant I didn’t get my new TV, this was going to be a 32in to replace a 26in CRT.

    Question! Would a 1080 be a better picture than a 720 on a 32in? And what is the difference between a 1080p and a 1080i and why isn’t it specified on a 720?

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Martyn the retired (U1168764) on Monday, 7th July 2008

    analoglover

    I can't post an explanation since I cannot do it in anything like a reasonable space, and a blackboard/pictures would be a real asset. And I suspect it would bore the pants off most folk.

    I did have a quick look on the web to see if anyone had done it, but I could not find a good one that properly explained the difference between i and p (interlaced and progressive scan). True there probably is one, but I didn't find it smiley - sadface

    What I would suggest, in order to have the greatest amount of future proofing, that first off, the set is labelled as "HD Ready". I think very few HD sets are sold that aren't now so that bit ought to be easy. (Possible the label is seen as no longer needed, 720p and 1080i support and an HDMI lead are the basics of the spec).

    I would then go on to suggest the set has a native resolution of 1080p, as if you meet both these conditions, the set can then show HD pictures from 1080p, 1080i and 720p sources. This cuts your choice of sets quite a bit, but there is still a good number from a variety of manufacturers.

    At the moment 1080i is the broadcast standard used by BBC HD on satellite and 720p looks like it will be the standard used on terrestrial digital. 1080p is unlikely to be broadcast for a fair while as it needs a lot of bandwidth (digital space) but BluRay discs can be made in this format. (And I think some are but I've not looked into it).

    Hope this helps, Martyn

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Chris (U1572381) on Tuesday, 8th July 2008

    I would go for a True HD (1080p) TV if you have the money to do so.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by PhilW (U1357752) on Wednesday, 9th July 2008

    unless your tv has had it i wouldnt even bother consider buying a new one.


    no lcd tv no matter what price is better than any crt and youll really notice the deterioration in picture quality if you buy an lcd.

    id stick with your 26 inch crt until you really have to buy a new one.

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Chris (U1572381) on Wednesday, 9th July 2008

    I agree. Stick with CRT until it dies.

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by analoglover (U12463172) on Tuesday, 15th July 2008

    Thanks for everyone’s technical advice and help.
    Went to have a proper look at the difference between a 1080 and a 720 TV, and found out that you are all correct. The best TV available is my old CRT.
    Only wanted freesat for its high quality HD pictures, but as they are to be viewed on a low quality TV I shall forget it until forced to change.
    No wonder I chose the name Analogue Lover!

    As a matter of interest, will the freesat and freeveiw pvrs use a system similar to PDC so I won’t have to pad the programmes to catch the end?

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Al (U1158256) on Tuesday, 15th July 2008

    will the freesat and freeveiw pvrs use a system similar to PDC so I won’t have to pad the programmes to catch the end? 

    I don't know about Freesat but I do have a Freeview Playback (rebranded Freeview+) recorder. My recorder offers two options. It can automatically add a padding time that I have previously chosen before and/or after the planned transmission time. Otherwise it can use "exact timing" in which case the recording starts and ends according to broadcast signals in a similar way to PDC. In theory this should be perfect. In practice, despite all the investment in new technology, broadcasters seem incapable of transmitting the required signal reliably. It is possible to miss a little from the start of a programme, or worse the end of a programme, or even miss a programme entirely. The Series Record feature (whereby one can chose to record every episode of a series in a couple of presses of buttons) only works when "exact timing" is selected.

    It is a gamble which is the greater risk - relying on the transmitted signal or relying on a programme not being retimed by more than the padding time.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Arthur_Penney (U3084528) on Wednesday, 27th August 2008

    Hi
    Hope you don't mind me joining in?
    I am thinking of going the Freesat method of digital, if I get a set top box and latter want a freesat PVR, will I be able to run both of the one dish? or will I need two feeds coming into the house?
    That is of course after I get a new HD ready TV 


    I got a Goodmans box for £70 a couple of months ago and just fed into it a wire that had been lying around the room since I moved in, connected to a satellite dish on the outside wall. It has worked perfectly from the start, my only slight problem was getting the feel of how to feed in my postcode. I got the £70 box rather than the £50 box because I thought that it had signal feedthrough so that I could add a second box if I wanted to. Have I made a £20 mistake?

    Also, I have noticed on my remote a programme list at the bottom, showing the words FTA. When I press Swap, it goes to a channel 0001 and says No Programmes Stored. What is this all about?

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Pumblechook (U6852342) on Wednesday, 27th August 2008

    Digihome or Durabrand Freeview recorder from Tesco or Asda. £70 - £80.

    Tesco and B+Q have digiboxes for £17-£18.

    Dont bother with expensive machines such as a Topfield. Expensive, not so easy to use and unreliable.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Chris (U1572381) on Wednesday, 27th August 2008

    The LNB out is to allow you to connect another satellite receiver, however to use the 2nd satellite receiver the fist needs to be put into standby as both boxes can't control the same single feed at once, due to the way signals are sent / received.

    Unlike a standard aerial and terrestrial TV (either analogue or digital) all the channels depending in your area is either sent vertical or horizontal - people in horizontal areas their aerial has the 'blades' pointing sideways, those in vertical areas have them pointing up and down.

    With satellite half the channels are horizontal, half are vertical. The satellite box has to send a voltage up the cable to the LNB which is on the end of the arm on the dish which the signal bounce into from the dish to tell the LNB to switch between horizontal or vertical mode (also whether to switch hi or lo).

    So if you have two boxes on one single feed LNB then the boxes will be fighting with each other to tell the LNB whether to be hi or lo and vertical or horizontal - both will be sending a voltage to the LNB when it should only be sent it from one box.

    So the LNB out on the Freesat box you have will protect itself and the 2nd box, for the 2nd box to take control of the LNB and get the channels the 1st box must be in standby.

    If you want more than one box to be used off one dish and both be used at the same time and used independently then the LNB on the dish needs to be one that can send out more than one feed and each section within the LNB to be independently controlled. For this you will need either a Quad LNB or Octo LNB on the dish where you can then wire a separate co-ax for each box.

    As for FTA. The stands for Free To Air.

    There are over 200 FTA TV channels and about 90 Radio channels, not all of these have paid Freesat yet to be listed on the Freesat EPG, though have paid Sky to be listed on the Sky. Probably a delay in paying to be added to the Freesat EPG as these channels want to see how well the platform does before spending money.

    In other countries and with other boxes there was no need for channels to pay for an EPG number as the satellite receiver would create the EPG number itself and allow you to edit, delete, rename etc. However like everything in the UK they want to control everything and charge for it.

    Still due to EU regulations you can not be prevented from watching Free To Air channels, so although they don't have a Freesat EPG number yet, you must be able to add the channels manually - just like in the good old satellite days, think of it like the old days where you had to tune a channel in to each number on the TV.

    If you pop along to the DigitalSpy website / forum you'll find details on how to add them manually.

    There are currently SD boxes (standard definition) and HD boxes (high definition).

    The Alba Group SD range currently are:

    BUSH BFSAT01SD
    GOODMANS GFSAT100SD
    GRUNDIG GUFSAT01SD

    These are all the same box, just a different badge on the front. Those beig just three of the many brand names Alba uses.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Arthur_Penney (U3084528) on Monday, 1st September 2008

    BexTech

    Thank you for your reply. Obviously I have wasted £20 getting the more expensive box but it is hardly going to be terminal.

    I have been very stupid with regard to the 'no channels stored' message on the FTA option. By going into Settings the mechanisms are there, although it only picked up a few extra local ITV channels. Neither the booklet nor the on-screen displays are comprehensive but I have found that I can muddle through. With no moving parts inside such as hard drives, I am beginning to suspect the boxes are expensive.

    I understand that some of these advanced machines (PVRs?, Digital Recorders?, I am more than a little confused) can deal with more than one channel at a time. How are they able to do that, bearing in mind your comment about conflicts? I am hoping that there will be something like this for the BBC/ITV Freesat system soon, although I fear the price. I am starting to think that there is not really enough on all these extra channels to bother, as the terrestrial will be forced to go to Freeview anyway within the next few years. I am absolutely thrilled with a Daewoo Hard Drive/DVD recorder from Asda for £60, complete with a 60 page instruction manual! I am now convinced by HDD recording. What a shame that it will only have a useful life of a couple of years before the system changes.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by Chris (U1572381) on Tuesday, 2nd September 2008

    The PVRs allow you to view one channel whilst recording another or record two channels, by having two feeds into the box.

    You have a Quad LNB or Octo LNB fitted to the dish and for one PVR you take two of the outputs from the LNB - like having two boxes sat next to each other.

    Around £50 isn't bad really for an SD satellite receiver, remembering the costs can't come down until there are enough people buying them and are then able to make them in higher numbers.

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Arthur_Penney (U3084528) on Wednesday, 18th March 2009

    I have recently become even more frustrated by the programme guide on my Goodmans SD Freesat box. It now seems to be showing No Information Available as the norm, and then builds up the entries. I am not sure whether it is deleting Remindered slots, so I can't accuse it of doing so. Is it having difficulty with extra channels since the start of the service, or has it been re-programmed with adverse effect? I still think that a Freesat box would have been better and cheaper if there had not been restricted manufacturers.

    Report message34

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