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Radio 3

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Messages: 1 - 10 of 10
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by BHP (U4732638) on Thursday, 2nd April 2009

    Before we lose the dedicated MB and have to start posting on a general purpose MB, can I ask a question?
    Radio 3 was originally a specialist network for classical music. Nowadays, I find that there are a lot of programmes about the spoken word plus a lot of jazz and music that to me isn't classical. A few examples taken from Friday's schedules are In Tune, The Verb, The Essay and World on 3. Why is this? After all, Radio 1 is continuous pop.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Andrew Bowden (U178009) on Thursday, 2nd April 2009

    Radio 1 isn't continuous pop - there's mainstream pop, hip hop, rnb, dance, rock, and other stuff. They're all different.

    There's probably Radio 1 listeners who despair every time Giles Peterson comes on with his mix of funk, soul and latin music!

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by JB on a slippery slope to the thin end ofdabiscuit (U13805036) on Thursday, 2nd April 2009

    The Third Programme was origianlly a speech network, the summit of John Reith's vision whereby the audience would graduate from the popular Light Programme (R2) to the Scholarly Third via the Literary Home Service/R4.

    Instead, the radio audience drained away to television, and so the Third (re-badged as R3 in 1967) gradually reduced its worthy-but-dull discussions and replaced them with orchestral music.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Tom Adustus (U9467814) on Thursday, 2nd April 2009

    there's mainstream pop, hip hop, rnb, dance, rock, and other stuff. They're all different.  

    That list certainly seems like pop music to me and that's what Radio 1 has always been for.





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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Tom Adustus (U9467814) on Thursday, 2nd April 2009

    Radio 3 was originally a specialist network for classical music. Nowadays, I find that there are a lot of programmes about the spoken word plus a lot of jazz and music that to me isn't classical. A few examples taken from Friday's schedules are In Tune, The Verb, The Essay and World on 3. Why is this? 

    There have always been jazz programmes, talks, arts discussion programmes, etc. alongside the serious music on Radio 3.

    What has changed is the mix within the day-time programmes and the presenetation which has in recent years dumbed-down to Classical FM levels and which is most off-putting. You now have a supposedly serious arts & music station using R2 style DJ production values. smiley - sadface


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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Andrew Bowden (U178009) on Thursday, 2nd April 2009

    They are different styles, and vary in a huge way. Rap is very different to The Cheeky Girls. And hey, even rap varies hugely in its style.

    There's no one thing called "pop".

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by BHP (U4732638) on Thursday, 2nd April 2009

    I do remember Radios 1-4 coming in about 1967, was it? In those days I hadn't discovered classical music and I hadn't noticed until quite recently the other programmes.
    I guess you're right that hip hop etc appeal to different people. It's just the only music I can't get to grips with is jazz. Madrigals, Mozart, Mendlessohn through to Duffy and Lady Gaga, I can handle, jazz I actually have to turn off.

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Lawrence Jones (U4805414) on Thursday, 2nd April 2009

    Radio 3 was originally a specialist network for classical music. 

    The late Derek Jewel (sadly now dead) -former Jazz critic with the Sunday Times - used to present an excellent Jazz/Blues/folk/pop programme on R3 (about 1969), entitled: 'Sounds Interesting'. He used to play bands like Jon Hiseman's Colloseum (1) and all the permutations of The Keef Harley Band (Henry Lowther, Miller Anderson etc)

    Reference

    (1)

    www.youtube.com/watc...

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Tom Adustus (U9467814) on Thursday, 2nd April 2009

    They are different styles, and vary in a huge way. Rap is very different to The Cheeky Girls. And hey, even rap varies hugely in its style.

    There's no one thing called "pop".  


    Nonsense.

    It's all pop music.

    If it quacks like a duck and waddles like a duck .......

    Pop music is a music genre that features a noticeable rhythmic element, melodies and hooks, a mainstream style and a conventional structure. 
    See: en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    Now that covers all of the styles of pop music listed earlier.

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Andrew Bowden (U178009) on Thursday, 2nd April 2009

    Well if all pop is pop, every single piece of classic music is exactly the same.

    Must be by that definition!

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