BBC Television programmes  permalink

Enjoyment ruined.

Messages: 1 - 50 of 67
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Saturday, 21st December 2013

    OK, it's one thing to talk over the credits, but I just switched on to be in time for Strictly, and there was Wizard singing their Christmas hit for the finale of the Christmas Pointless - and then HUH!

    The continuity announcer breaks in over the band's performance to tell us that the next programme will be SCD.

    Really, BBC, do you really think we enjoy the continuity announcer more than a band playing one of the all time Christmas classics?

    You really couldn't have waited ten seconds to tell us WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW! smiley - doh

    When are you going to learn to respect your viewers and the people who make these programmes?

    I'm so angry, and now I've missed the beginning of Strictly writing this.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by ZIP-IT-SHRIMPY (U15436784) on Saturday, 21st December 2013

    I agree with you, many do, unfortunately the BBC really, really don't.

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  • Message 3

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    Posted by Johnbee (U542312) on Saturday, 21st December 2013

    Come on OP. The BBC gets billions of pounds and has to spend the money so that rich peoples' daughters can get a job as continuity announcers etc. If they didn't do that, how would Lords' families get money? Even on BBC 4 there was a chatty woman preventing us listening to the choirboy during the credits of Tinker Tailor. What do you want, them to have some of your money left over at the year end? That would never do when there are still snouts to get in the trough.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by deliacooks (U15907597) on Saturday, 21st December 2013

    I thought so, too. They just can't leave things alone any more, they have to continually be giving us more information, even at the expense of cutting into their own programmes.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by meldrewsrevenge (U13159010) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    It's a mystery why the broadcasters employ continuity bods to do a job that is infinitely better done by a button on your remote, and to the detriment of viewers' enjoyment

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  • Message 6

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    Posted by Sir Walter Ker of Cessford (U15960320) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    It's a mystery why the broadcasters employ continuity bods to do a job that is infinitely better done by a button on your remote, and to the detriment of viewers' enjoyment 
    Here you are:

    There is something on continuity announcers and talking over the final credits.

    www.youtube.com/watc...

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Here you are:

    There is something on continuity announcers and talking over the final credits. 

    I'm not being picky, but this thread isn't about indents or talking over the credits.

    My complaint is that the continuity announcer interrupted a performance of a group of musicians - even though he could have waited ten seconds and not UTTERLY RUINED MY ENJOYMENT.

    The question is - why do the highly paid people at the BBC think the public would rather listen to the continuity announcer's voice than the group of musicians, assembled at great expense, to play out the final moments of the Pointless Christmas Special.

    Note: Not the Continuity Announcer Christmas Special.

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Sir Walter Ker of Cessford (U15960320) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    But, in that video, a continuity announcer speaks about his job, what he sees it as doing - the other side of the coin. It was not there to stray off topic. If you think it was, then all you have to do is report it.

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    But, in that video, a continuity announcer speaks about his job, what he sees it as doing - the other side of the coin. It was not there to stray off topic. If you think it was, then all you have to do is report it. 
    Duh... We already know what a continuity announcer's job is - and it's not to ruin my enjoyment by talking over the programme.

    The clip you linked to completely misses the point, and no I'm not going to report it.

    I repeat, my complaint is that he talked over the music, which I was enjoying.

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Sir Walter Ker of Cessford (U15960320) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Sorry, I felt that he was justifying talking over the end of a program as something to do to keep people hooked into the channel. That is why they do it, and it is good to hear it explicitly stated. What he said seemed to mean that snything at the end of a program is vulnerable, including the music you speak about.

    And, just so that you know, I am on your side on this. Just as I don't like it when they play the beginning of a piece of music at the end of the program, but don't finish it.

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by susiesar (U10941938) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Here you are:

    There is something on continuity announcers and talking over the final credits. 

    I'm not being picky, but this thread isn't about indents or talking over the credits.

    My complaint is that the continuity announcer interrupted a performance of a group of musicians - even though he could have waited ten seconds and not UTTERLY RUINED MY ENJOYMENT.

    The question is - why do the highly paid people at the BBC think the public would rather listen to the continuity announcer's voice than the group of musicians, assembled at great expense, to play out the final moments of the Pointless Christmas Special.

    Note: Not the Continuity Announcer Christmas Special. 
    Missing ten seconds of a trite overplayed rubbish pop song UTTERLY RUINED MY ENJOYMENT classic

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by HoraceCoker (U14258478) ** on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    OK, it's one thing to talk over the credits, but I just switched on to be in time for Strictly, and there was Wizard singing their Christmas hit for the finale of the Christmas Pointless - and then HUH!

    The continuity announcer breaks in over the band's performance to tell us that the next programme will be SCD.

    Really, BBC, do you really think we enjoy the continuity announcer more than a band playing one of the all time Christmas classics?

    You really couldn't have waited ten seconds to tell us WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW! smiley - doh

    When are you going to learn to respect your viewers and the people who make these programmes?

    I'm so angry, and now I've missed the beginning of Strictly writing this. 
    ....I'm totally with you on this.....why the Beeb persist with this idiotic practice is beyond me....my thumb is hovered over the mute button just waiting...and its not selective....its all the bl**dy time......I was watching a documentary a few months ago about the Le Mans 24 race tragedy in 1955....and wouldn't you know it .....the sad reflective music palyed at the end was interrupted by the jaunty tones of the CA...banging on about some upcoming celeb show..I nearly put my foot through the screen........for god sake Mr DG....if you do nothing else....just eradicate this practice .....pronto....

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Missing ten seconds of a trite overplayed rubbish pop song UTTERLY RUINED MY ENJOYMENT classic 
    Glad you agree.

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Continuity announcers are a total waste of space . I hate them with such a passion I often shout out at the TV telling them to shut up!! (except it's a lot less polite than that).
    I've watched some documentary programmes on other non BBC channels where they've started their inane waffling while the narrator is still talking.

    BBC- WE DON'T NEeD TO BE TOLD WHAT'S COMING NEXT!! smiley - steam

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  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by fishplate (U15522541) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Continuity announcers are a total waste of space . I hate them with such a passion I often shout out at the TV telling them to shut up!! (except it's a lot less polite than that).
    I've watched some documentary programmes on other non BBC channels where they've started their inane waffling while the narrator is still talking.

    BBC- WE DON'T NEeD TO BE TOLD WHAT'S COMING NEXT!! smiley - steam 
    Even worse is when they play a long trailer and waffle on about a programme that is on NEXT !!

    smiley - doh

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  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Sorry, I felt that he was justifying talking over the end of a program as something to do to keep people hooked into the channel. 
    Sorry if I misunderstood your good intentions.

    I think they have it totally wrong on this. Most people already have their viewing planned, and especially programmes like SCD, which people watch every week. In fact, I usually avoid Pointless, and only turned the TV on because I knew Strictly was about to begin. I was pleasantly surprised to see that they'd got Wizard to play their classic hit, and was happily grooving along when the CA butted in.

    It might seem like cutting off my nose TSMF, but I couldn't be bothered after that - so I actually missed the final of SCD after having watched the whole series. (Had it on in the background for a while, and then switched channels.)

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by CannotResistThisOne (U15930232) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Continuity announcers are a total waste of space . I hate them with such a passion I often shout out at the TV telling them to shut up!! (except it's a lot less polite than that).
    I've watched some documentary programmes on other non BBC channels where they've started their inane waffling while the narrator is still talking.

    BBC- WE DON'T NEeD TO BE TOLD WHAT'S COMING NEXT!! smiley - steam 
    Remember that scene from Network with Peter Finch. "I want you to get up right now and go to the window, open it and stick your head out and yell: 'I'm mad as hell and I am not going to take this any more'."

    www.youtube.com/watc...

    I wish!

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  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by QE (U15612083) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Something that causes you to miss both Strictly and Wizzard - that's public service broadcasting at its best!

    Having said that, I agree in principle. How long will it be before the BBC jumps on the gimmicky bandwagon of displaying an animated caption a few minutes before the end of every programme saying what's "coming up". It's as if they want to reassure us that there will be something better on soon.

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  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by QE (U15612083) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013


    BBC- WE DON'T NEeD TO BE TOLD WHAT'S COMING NEXT!! smiley - steam 
    And I particularly don't want to be told what's going to happen in the next episode of the programme I have just watched.

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  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by DaveA (U14937949) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Is this a unique post or what!????

    Zencat complaining that dialogue was ruining the background music! What has this board become ! smiley - yikes

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by SAB888 (U14777346) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Having said that, I agree in principle. How long will it be before the BBC jumps on the gimmicky bandwagon of displaying an animated caption a few minutes before the end of every programme saying what's "coming up". It's as if they want to reassure us that there will be something better on soon.  C5 are one of the worst at doing that. I'd like to think that if BBC1 or BBC2 tried that, there would be a large amount of complaints. Having said that, wasn't there something about an IPP (inappropriate programme pointer) on a Dr. Who episode some years ago?

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  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    I'm in the camp who like and enjoy the little what's on next etc announcements. And for the poor sighted they are really helpful.

    Perhaps to reach middle ground those few seconds, because they are less than a minute aren't they, could be allowed for in the BBC scheduling?

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  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by SAB888 (U14777346) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    I'm in the camp who like and enjoy the little what's on next etc announcements. And for the poor sighted they are really helpful.

    Perhaps to reach middle ground those few seconds, because they are less than a minute aren't they, could be allowed for in the BBC scheduling? 
    I wouldn't mind them at all if they were in the appropriate place, in between programmes. They should not be during programmes and that includes end credits. Simple!

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  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by HoraceCoker (U14258478) ** on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    I'm in the camp who like and enjoy the little what's on next etc announcements. And for the poor sighted they are really helpful.

    Perhaps to reach middle ground those few seconds, because they are less than a minute aren't they, could be allowed for in the BBC scheduling? 
    I wouldn't mind them at all if they were in the appropriate place, in between programmes. They should not be during programmes and that includes end credits. Simple! 
    ....as it should be.....no interruption during closing credits......then...."...and now on BBC1 ......". Programs might start on time too....not the obligatory 2 minutes late...and if late....a reason given......even an apology......

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  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by deliacooks (U15907597) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    I'm in the camp who like and enjoy the little what's on next etc announcements. And for the poor sighted they are really helpful.

    Perhaps to reach middle ground those few seconds, because they are less than a minute aren't they, could be allowed for in the BBC scheduling? 
    I wouldn't mind them at all if they were in the appropriate place, in between programmes. They should not be during programmes and that includes end credits. Simple! 
    ....as it should be.....no interruption during closing credits......then...."...and now on BBC1 ......". Programs might start on time too....not the obligatory 2 minutes late...and if late....a reason given......even an apology...... 
    Don't get me started on how the programmes on BBC are no longer on time.....
    Of course, some of this IS caused by all the stupid adverts etc. But it means that if you change channels, you miss the beginning of something you wanted. Aaaaaaargh!

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  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    I'm in the camp who like and enjoy the little what's on next etc announcements. And for the poor sighted they are really helpful.

    Perhaps to reach middle ground those few seconds, because they are less than a minute aren't they, could be allowed for in the BBC scheduling? 
    I wouldn't mind them at all if they were in the appropriate place, in between programmes. They should not be during programmes and that includes end credits. Simple! 
    ....as it should be.....no interruption during closing credits......then...."...and now on BBC1 ......". Programs might start on time too....not the obligatory 2 minutes late...and if late....a reason given......even an apology...... 
    Don't get me started on how the programmes on BBC are no longer on time.....
    Of course, some of this IS caused by all the stupid adverts etc. But it means that if you change channels, you miss the beginning of something you wanted. Aaaaaaargh! 
    smiley - laugh which is why someone telling you what's on next during the credits or ending music gives you a good chance to turn over if you don't want to want to watch and before a programme on another channel starts........ smiley - devil

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  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Owen Herring (U2135393) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Why can't we go back to the days of proper continuity announcements?

    www.youtube.com/watc...

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  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by deliacooks (U15907597) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    I'm in the camp who like and enjoy the little what's on next etc announcements. And for the poor sighted they are really helpful.

    Perhaps to reach middle ground those few seconds, because they are less than a minute aren't they, could be allowed for in the BBC scheduling? 
    I wouldn't mind them at all if they were in the appropriate place, in between programmes. They should not be during programmes and that includes end credits. Simple! 
    ....as it should be.....no interruption during closing credits......then...."...and now on BBC1 ......". Programs might start on time too....not the obligatory 2 minutes late...and if late....a reason given......even an apology...... 
    Don't get me started on how the programmes on BBC are no longer on time.....
    Of course, some of this IS caused by all the stupid adverts etc. But it means that if you change channels, you miss the beginning of something you wanted. Aaaaaaargh! 
    smiley - laugh which is why someone telling you what's on next during the credits or ending music gives you a good chance to turn over if you don't want to want to watch and before a programme on another channel starts........ smiley - devil 
    Nooooo!! If only it worked like that smiley - smiley) smiley - smiley)

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  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Monty Burns (U7868864) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    I cannot believe that the TV execs think there's an army of viewer out there who have no idea what programme is coming up next. Surely most people plan an evenings viewing in advance and know exactly what they intend to watch and no amount of trailers or "coming up next" is going to change their minds

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  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Stephen Jones - in our hearts we are Greenlanders (U1175342) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    I tick off everything I want to watch the night before in my tv guide. From when I wake it's all sorted for the day. The only thing the announcers do is make me change channels to avoid them. That is their one valid use - making me watch other channels and try new programmes.

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  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Two Wheels (U14661444) on Sunday, 22nd December 2013

    Why can't we go back to the days of proper continuity announcements?

    www.youtube.com/watc... 
    Ah yes.
    Back to the days of the potter's wheel!

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  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Monday, 23rd December 2013

    Something that causes you to miss both Strictly and Wizzard - that's public service broadcasting at its best!

    Having said that, I agree in principle. How long will it be before the BBC jumps on the gimmicky bandwagon of displaying an animated caption a few minutes before the end of every programme saying what's "coming up". It's as if they want to reassure us that there will be something better on soon. 
    They did it already when the How Do You Solve A Problem Like Maria programme was advertised in a crucial moment on Dr. Who!

    Charlie Brooker was furious about this on another programme elsewhere.

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  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by david fogarty (U14299453) on Monday, 23rd December 2013

    Why can't we go back to the days of proper continuity announcements?

    www.youtube.com/watc... 
    Ah yes.
    Back to the days of the potter's wheel! 
    I preferred the kitten playing with ball of knitting wool myself.

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  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Monday, 23rd December 2013

    There is only one thing worse than a continuity announcer intruding on a programme .... a continuity announcer who think they are funny and intruding on a programme. Cue BBC3 and the oh-so-funny quips between programmes ..... not! smiley - grr

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  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Dee (U15846799) on Monday, 23rd December 2013

    Is this a unique post or what!????

    Zencat complaining that dialogue was ruining the background music! What has this board become ! smiley - yikes 
    smiley - biggrin

    Reply to this message 35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Sue_Aitch (U3336990) on Monday, 23rd December 2013

    You might remember this www.youtube.com/watc...

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  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Stephen Jones - in our hearts we are Greenlanders (U1175342) on Monday, 23rd December 2013

    Can someone from the bbc explain why they persist with doing something that nobody likes and loses them viewers? What use is it to the bbc and most importantly the viewers? Why do you think the people who pay for the programmes have no right to not have them vandalised by announcers?

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  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Monday, 23rd December 2013

    It isn't true that nobody likes it. Whether it is true that it loses them viewers or not I don't know, I'm sure they monitor that sort of thing.

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  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by deliacooks (U15907597) on Monday, 23rd December 2013

    It isn't true that nobody likes it. Whether it is true that it loses them viewers or not I don't know, I'm sure they monitor that sort of thing.  I don't the think they monitor anything like that - I think they just do as they please. Auntie knows best!!

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  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Monday, 23rd December 2013

    Personally I enjoy the end credits.

    It usually has poignant music and often times you like to see the names of some of the cast that you enjoyed in the production but dont know off hand.

    When the credits are shrunk down, sped up and/or talked over - in my personal opinion - opinion not fact - its as if the TV network is saying "well enough of that show you just watched, that is no longer important, what we want to do now is sell you another of our products whilst we have you in the store."

    Its like going to dinner and whilst you are still enjoying your desert and coffee having the server pop over and start telling you what specials they will have on offer tomorrow.

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  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Monday, 23rd December 2013

    It isn't true that nobody likes it. Whether it is true that it loses them viewers or not I don't know, I'm sure they monitor that sort of thing.  I don't the think they monitor anything like that - I think they just do as they please. Auntie knows best!!  smiley - laugh of course they do, they monitor everything. I know a lot of people complain about it, but it's not a majority of the total viewers. A lot of people probably can't be bothered to complain, but in the same way, a lot of people don't actually come out and say they do like it either.

    Have you never been asked to join a feedback poll? That's where a lot of the information comes from. I get invited to them all the time, to give views on all sorts of things.

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  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Stephen Jones - in our hearts we are Greenlanders (U1175342) on Tuesday, 24th December 2013

    It isn't true that nobody likes it. Whether it is true that it loses them viewers or not I don't know, I'm sure they monitor that sort of thing.  I never heard anyone complain that an announcer didn't talk over the programme, that something was missing. As for info, is it even possible to watch television without an EPG in the digibox? I see many tv guide magazines in the newsagents, companies don't publish them if people don't buy them. Why would people not avoid something they hate by changing channels?

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  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by HoraceCoker (U14258478) ** on Tuesday, 24th December 2013

    Personally I enjoy the end credits.

    It usually has poignant music and often times you like to see the names of some of the cast that you enjoyed in the production but dont know off hand.

    When the credits are shrunk down, sped up and/or talked over - in my personal opinion - opinion not fact - its as if the TV network is saying "well enough of that show you just watched, that is no longer important, what we want to do now is sell you another of our products whilst we have you in the store."

    Its like going to dinner and whilst you are still enjoying your desert and coffee having the server pop over and start telling you what specials they will have on offer tomorrow. 
    ...good analogy....its all just a big pain in the derriere...nothing against the CA's....if they know their place...and its certainly not during the closing credits....no doubt they will be on overdrive over christmas....its like we are bored with this programme....its all in the past....we can't wait for it to end....so we will natter over the closing credits because we can't wait for the next one.....

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  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Pumpkin_Patch_Paul (U14565900) on Tuesday, 24th December 2013

    I'm in the camp who like and enjoy the little what's on next etc announcements. And for the poor sighted they are really helpful.

    Perhaps to reach middle ground those few seconds, because they are less than a minute aren't they, could be allowed for in the BBC scheduling? 
    I wouldn't mind them at all if they were in the appropriate place, in between programmes. They should not be during programmes and that includes end credits. Simple! 
    Yes you are right it is as simple as that and the days scheduling would over run by about 5-10 minutes and we all would be happy.....smiley - smiley

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  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by deliacooks (U15907597) on Tuesday, 24th December 2013

    Personally I enjoy the end credits.

    It usually has poignant music and often times you like to see the names of some of the cast that you enjoyed in the production but dont know off hand.

    When the credits are shrunk down, sped up and/or talked over - in my personal opinion - opinion not fact - its as if the TV network is saying "well enough of that show you just watched, that is no longer important, what we want to do now is sell you another of our products whilst we have you in the store."

    Its like going to dinner and whilst you are still enjoying your desert and coffee having the server pop over and start telling you what specials they will have on offer tomorrow. 
    ...good analogy....its all just a big pain in the derriere...nothing against the CA's....if they know their place...and its certainly not during the closing credits....no doubt they will be on overdrive over christmas....its like we are bored with this programme....its all in the past....we can't wait for it to end....so we will natter over the closing credits because we can't wait for the next one..... 
    Yes!!!!!

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  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Tuesday, 24th December 2013

    I wouldn't mind them at all if they were in the appropriate place, in between programmes. They should not be during programmes and that includes end credits. Simple! 
    Yes you are right it is as simple as that and the days scheduling would over run by about 5-10 minutes and we all would be happy.....smiley - smiley 

    There was a time when the continuity announcers confined their remarks to the intervals between the programmes, and it never caused the programmes to run late.

    There's plenty of time for announcements between the programmes.

    I used to respect the CAs, but not any more. I know it's not their fault, they're just doing their job. But the moment I hear their voice butting into the carefully created dramatic atmosphere - just to tell me what I already know smiley - doh - I reach for the remote.

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  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by Lee (U1149673) ** on Tuesday, 24th December 2013

    There was a time when the continuity announcers confined their remarks to the intervals between the programmes, and it never caused the programmes to run late.

    There's plenty of time for announcements between the programmes.  

    All broadcasters (not just the BBC) started making announcements during the end credits when they discovered most viewers start channel hopping as soon as the credits start rolling. Waiting until a programme has finished before telling people what's coming up next is too late - they've already gone!

    Reply to this message 47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Tuesday, 24th December 2013

    There was a time when the continuity announcers confined their remarks to the intervals between the programmes, and it never caused the programmes to run late.

    There's plenty of time for announcements between the programmes.  

    All broadcasters (not just the BBC) started making announcements during the end credits when they discovered most viewers start channel hopping as soon as the credits start rolling. Waiting until a programme has finished before telling people what's coming up next is too late - they've already gone! 

    1. I don't care if it's other broadcasters too. That's not an argument for anything.

    2. Having the extremely irritating announcer butting in does not stop people from channel hopping. Rather, the reverse.

    3. We already know what's coming on next because we plan our viewing. We certainly don' t hang around to watch a programme we don't want to watch just because the CA has just butted in and annoyed us by being patronising.

    Reply to this message 48

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  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by Stephen Jones - in our hearts we are Greenlanders (U1175342) on Tuesday, 24th December 2013

    I have the ability to read a tv guide so if i'm gone i'm gone. The announcers just make it happen sooner.

    Reply to this message 49

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  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by SAB888 (U14777346) on Tuesday, 24th December 2013

    There was a time when the continuity announcers confined their remarks to the intervals between the programmes, and it never caused the programmes to run late.

    There's plenty of time for announcements between the programmes.  

    All broadcasters (not just the BBC) started making announcements during the end credits when they discovered most viewers start channel hopping as soon as the credits start rolling. Waiting until a programme has finished before telling people what's coming up next is too late - they've already gone! 
    Most? Where does that come from, viewer surveys? I'm more likely to change channels because the CA chimes in.

    Reply to this message 50

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