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The Culture Show: Lady Gaga

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Peter (U15306870) on Wednesday, 13th November 2013

    For those who'd like to post their comments on The Culture Show: Lady Gaga interview - then please use this thread.

    What did you make of it all? Are you a fan? Or maybe you've never heard of her.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Wednesday, 13th November 2013

    I think she's gaga.

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  • Message 3

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    Posted by wolfie (U15842015) ** on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    Isnt one interview with her on the bbc enough.

    Whats the point of interviewing her on different bbc programs.

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  • Message 4

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    Posted by laughinsam (U11244950) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    Isnt one interview with her on the bbc enough.

    Whats the point of interviewing her on different bbc programs. 
    I don't think Graham Norton's frivolous chat counts as an interview, do you?

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  • Message 5

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    Posted by AmosBurke (U8229185) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    Very odd production values, no doubt intended to make the program more "arty". What was the point of interspersing the low resolution mobile-phone type bits of Sawyer? When she was in the street, waiting for the interview to start, they used a "proper" camera, yet with the obviously later filmed inserts, a phone or a special effect to make it appear as if a phone was used. I do wish these "meeja studies" types would just produce a straight forward program.

    Also, why bother showing Sawyer "interviewing" a shop dummy in the front of the van? It was just plain silly.

    As to Gaga, I thought she did exactly what she was supposed to do, promote herself. Gaga is a very capable self-publicist and is nearly always performing. As she said, the hotel lobby is just one of her many stages, and she certainly showed this.

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  • Message 6

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    Posted by FowPah (U1746998) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    I know I'm getting old when this sort of thing just passes me by.I couldn't name one song of hers.

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  • Message 7

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    Posted by wolfie (U15842015) ** on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    So sam...youd rather see someone acting to promote herself than someone being natural as she was on norton...fair enough...

    I think id rather do without the former and have the latter...

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  • Message 8

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    Posted by laughinsam (U11244950) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    So sam...youd rather see someone acting to promote herself than someone being natural as she was on norton...fair enough...

    I think id rather do without the former and have the latter... 
    Actually I think both interviews failed to reveal the real "Gaga".

    Graham Norton's interview was his usual trivia fest littered with thinly veiled anecdote prompts. Nothing wrong with that of course, it's just not my cup of tea.

    On the other hand the Culture Show's attempt with it's pseudo surreal set and overly deferential interviewing technique barely scratched the surface of an icon who at first sight seems to be quite a complex individual.

    What did we learn? Well not a lot actually. Apart from the fact that she seems to be a thoroughly nice person who seems to be on some sort of journey of self discovery.

    So IMO both interviews were superficial in there own way. Having said that I suppose at least Graham's didn't set out to determine whether Lady Gaga is profound or just plain pretentious.

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  • Message 9

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    Posted by lluncoolj (U7676659) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    Lady GaGa is a fascinating and complex creature. She is extremely eloquent, highly intelligent and charismatic but, at the end of the day, it is only pop music, the over-analysis sometimes came across as a little too intense. Still, it was The Culture Show, so what did we expect.

    Miranda Sawyer is a fine writer, but not a natural interviewer. I felt the interview was a bit stilted on occasions, and it also didn't help that Sawyer pronounced her name as 'Gagger', but I can see why she said she was 'blown away' by LG.

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  • Message 10

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    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    but, at the end of the day, it is only pop music,  
    I really cannot find the words to comment on this.

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  • Message 11

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    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    She acts the complex artist. But that act, for me, lacks any depth. But her target audience may well lap it up. We're all here to be manipulated after all. I would have liked to have seen her in conversation with Grayson Perry. Perhaps that could be arranged, Peter ?

    LG did ressemble the glorious Amy Allison, I thought. But that's where it ended.
    No pretence with Mose's daughter...

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  • Message 12

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    Posted by Mr_Lightning (U15450350) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    I felt the interview was a bit stilted on occasions, and it also didn't help that Sawyer pronounced her name as 'Gagger',  

    Yes, why was that?

    It doesn't inspire much confidence that the interviewer knows much about her subject if she can't even pronounce Lady Gaga's name correctly, given that

    a) it's a very simple word - even babies can say it - and

    b) it's probably one of the best-known names in Western culture just at the moment.

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  • Message 13

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    Posted by Polemicist (U14349342) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    I don't know why the moderator, Peter, has totally unnecessarily now started a brand new thread about this interview with Lady Gaga on The Culture Show?

    What was wrong with my existing one?

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

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  • Message 14

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    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) ** on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    I don't know why the moderator, Peter, has totally unnecessarily now started a brand new thread about this interview with Lady Gaga on The Culture Show?

    What was wrong with my existing one?

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb... 
    Quite right. Peter should have used the search function to avoid a duplicate thread, which could be removed.

    Hang on?!?

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  • Message 15

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    Posted by Bananas are the best (U15650112) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    Host, and his was the older thread, I think.

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  • Message 16

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    Posted by wolfie (U15842015) ** on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    Dont think so...polemiscists thread was before the program.

    Looks like hosts can ride roughshod over the rules that mere mortals have to stick to.

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by Peter (U15306870) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    The original thread was in place before you'd posted your one, TP. I intentionally created it early to avoid the expected duplicate threads.

    Reply to this message 17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Peter (U15306870) on Thursday, 14th November 2013

    Dont think so...polemiscists thread was before the program.

    Looks like hosts can ride roughshod over the rules that mere mortals have to stick to. 
    My bad - you're right wolfie. He posted his very early on Wednesday - but I didn't catch it on search, so apologies.

    I created this one as close to the transmission as possible as I wanted to catch immediate reaction to the programme.

    Let's keep all the discussion in here now. And apols to TP.

    Reply to this message 18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Friday, 15th November 2013

    Very odd production values, no doubt intended to make the program more "arty". What was the point of interspersing the low resolution mobile-phone type bits of Sawyer? When she was in the street, waiting for the interview to start, they used a "proper" camera, yet with the obviously later filmed inserts, a phone or a special effect to make it appear as if a phone was used. I do wish these "meeja studies" types would just produce a straight forward program.

    Also, why bother showing Sawyer "interviewing" a shop dummy in the front of the van? It was just plain silly.

    As to Gaga, I thought she did exactly what she was supposed to do, promote herself. Gaga is a very capable self-publicist and is nearly always performing. As she said, the hotel lobby is just one of her many stages, and she certainly showed this. 
    Was the interviewing of a shop dummy in tribute to Dr. Who's 50th anniversary's celebrations -I remember seeing the dummies that came to life.

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  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Sunday, 17th November 2013

    Very odd production values, no doubt intended to make the program more "arty". What was the point of interspersing the low resolution mobile-phone type bits of Sawyer? When she was in the street, waiting for the interview to start, they used a "proper" camera, yet with the obviously later filmed inserts, a phone or a special effect to make it appear as if a phone was used. I do wish these "meeja studies" types would just produce a straight forward program.

    Also, why bother showing Sawyer "interviewing" a shop dummy in the front of the van? It was just plain silly.

    As to Gaga, I thought she did exactly what she was supposed to do, promote herself. Gaga is a very capable self-publicist and is nearly always performing. As she said, the hotel lobby is just one of her many stages, and she certainly showed this. 
    Was the interviewing of a shop dummy in tribute to Dr. Who's 50th anniversary's celebrations -I remember seeing the dummies that came to life. 
    There was also a mash-up of Bad Romance and David Tennant's appearance on Buzzcocks which tickled me...on the chorus it would show him mouthing 'BARROWMAN!'

    'I need John Barrowman' being a misheard lyric.

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by aviddiva (U13145965) on Sunday, 17th November 2013

    Very odd production values, no doubt intended to make the program more "arty". What was the point of interspersing the low resolution mobile-phone type bits of Sawyer? When she was in the street, waiting for the interview to start, they used a "proper" camera, yet with the obviously later filmed inserts, a phone or a special effect to make it appear as if a phone was used. I do wish these "meeja studies" types would just produce a straight forward program.

    Also, why bother showing Sawyer "interviewing" a shop dummy in the front of the van? It was just plain silly.

    As to Gaga, I thought she did exactly what she was supposed to do, promote herself. Gaga is a very capable self-publicist and is nearly always performing. As she said, the hotel lobby is just one of her many stages, and she certainly showed this. 
    Was the interviewing of a shop dummy in tribute to Dr. Who's 50th anniversary's celebrations -I remember seeing the dummies that came to life. 
    There was also a mash-up of Bad Romance and David Tennant's appearance on Buzzcocks which tickled me...on the chorus it would show him mouthing 'BARROWMAN!'

    'I need John Barrowman' being a misheard lyric. 
    Were her fans named Little Monsters in tribute to the Tony Le Mesmer interview on Knowing Me Knowing You where he says to Alan Partridge that every time 'A-ha' is said, he will become a little monster?

    I can't forget him going 'Grrr!' at the camera.

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  • Message 22

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    Posted by Rumbaba (U13744896) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    I thought she was an ok interviewee in that she answered everything she was asked . She looked a bit strange, the set was a bit strange and Miranda Sawyer is only marginally better than Jools Holland at conducting an interview. So, in the end, a waste of time.

    I saw her a while back with Paul O' Grady, she was very natural with him, did a few songs and it looked like fun. It seemed to go on for hours and there was a real connection. I'm not a huge fan of P O'G and I can't remember how I came to be watching it, but it was very entertaining, revealing and not marred by the arty-farty pretension that MS brings to the party. If you are interested in her, then check out that interview, it's a thousand times better than this.

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  • Message 23

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    Posted by PaulHammond (U5000908) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    Well....

    This IS an arts discussion programme, and the 3rd album IS called "ArtPop" in a clearly intentional role reversal of Warhol et als Pop Art.

    So, I'd have said trying to get to the bottom of why Gaga works with various artists, and whether her references to art are sprinkles on the top of the cake, or a major ingredient is an important question, and not one that Paul O Grady, Graham Norton or Alan Carr is going to get at in a light entertainment format interview.

    So in the end, I think an interview attempting to take her pretentions seriously is called for.

    I've seen better and worse Culture Shows before - this was okay, and I really didn't mind that Miranda Sawyer wasn't Graham Norton. Did wonder why the plastic mannequins though.

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  • Message 24

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    Posted by Rumbaba (U13744896) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    Well....

    This IS an arts discussion programme, and the 3rd album IS called "ArtPop" in a clearly intentional role reversal of Warhol et als Pop Art.

    So, I'd have said trying to get to the bottom of why Gaga works with various artists, and whether her references to art are sprinkles on the top of the cake, or a major ingredient is an important question, and not one that Paul O Grady, Graham Norton or Alan Carr is going to get at in a light entertainment format interview.

    So in the end, I think an interview attempting to take her pretentions seriously is called for.

    I've seen better and worse Culture Shows before - this was okay, and I really didn't mind that Miranda Sawyer wasn't Graham Norton. Did wonder why the plastic mannequins though. 
    You obviously didn't see the Paul O'Grady interview I am talking about. It was a 'special' , I think an hour, maybe longer, It wasn't 10 minutes on somebody's sofa, it was her being very natural, incredibly frank and actually doing some songs in between. She opened up much more because he made a connection and she likes him. The MS interview was, in a sense, more lightweight because it really didn't get any deeper than the album sleeve notes or the press releases - no real connection, no reason to confide, just candyfloss.

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  • Message 25

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    Posted by Polemicist (U14349342) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    What Lady Gaga is attempting to do is absolutely nothing new.

    David Bowie, Bjork and Maddona have done it all before, and with much greater effect.

    So long as televised media broadcasters continue to give her 'the oxygen of massive amounts of free publicity', Lady Gaga, et al, will all see it as both an incredibly cheap and effective way of promoting their latest album.

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  • Message 26

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    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    Every succeeding generation must want one, TP

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  • Message 27

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    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Monday, 18th November 2013

    What Lady Gaga is attempting to do is absolutely nothing new.

    David Bowie, Bjork and Maddona have done it all before, and with much greater effect.

    So long as televised media broadcasters continue to give her 'the oxygen of massive amounts of free publicity', Lady Gaga, et al, will all see it as both an incredibly cheap and effective way of promoting their latest album. 
    I'd say Lada Gaga has far surpassed anything done by Bjork.

    Never cared for Bjork, her style reminds me of Yoko Ono.

    Its not very musical to my ears anyway.

    At least with Gaga, Madonna, Bowie, there is some musicality that you can dance to, sing along with.

    I personally dont find that with Bjork. Its more of a tuneless drone.

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  • Message 28

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    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    I can understand why the bbc tv feels a need to aid the publicity bandwagon of these global vessels but once in a while they could do the same for artists at the other end of the spectrum. Alasdair Roberts for example, who I turn to when needing an antidote after being exposed to something I didn't really want to hear, earlier.

    www.youtube.com/watc...

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  • Message 29

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    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Monday, 18th November 2013

    I can understand why the bbc tv feels a need to aid the publicity bandwagon of these global vessels but once in a while they could do the same for artists at the other end of the spectrum. Alasdair Roberts for example, who I turn to when needing an antidote after being exposed to something I didn't really want to hear, earlier.

    www.youtube.com/watc... 
    "Later with Jools Holland" seems to feature a lot of acts that are not particularly well known or main stream.

    So the BBC does provide a performance forum for artists who are not "global vessels".

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  • Message 30

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    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    >>So the BBC does provide a performance forum

    Yes, and it's the very,very,very least they can do.

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  • Message 31

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    Posted by Rumbaba (U13744896) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    It all went bit 'corporate' a while back but Jools is back on track -ish. Personally, I would ban all these bands from showing up mob-handed, with strings, brass, backing singers and whatever. If you are a 4 piece guitar band, then let's see how you cut it as a band.

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  • Message 32

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    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Monday, 18th November 2013

    It all went bit 'corporate' a while back but Jools is back on track -ish. Personally, I would ban all these bands from showing up mob-handed, with strings, brass, backing singers and whatever. If you are a 4 piece guitar band, then let's see how you cut it as a band.  Hmmmm

    I've seen Brian Setzer perform in concert.

    For part of the show he fronted a large "big band" (the Brian Setzer orchestra) which was very reminiscent of the type of band you would see backing Frank Sinatra or Louis Armstrong.

    This was complete with brass section, keyboards, backing singers.

    And Setzer played a straightforward mix of rock, rockabilly, as well as some jazz standards - even tossed in the Hawaii 50 theme song.

    Later in the show, he did a stripped down set with just the stand-up bass player and the drummer playing just a snare and one crass cymbal.

    He played a medley of Stray Cats tunes.

    Never once did I think Setzer couldnt cut it.

    In fact, the versality of performance and song writing styles made me think he could cut it at various levels and genres.

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  • Message 33

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    Posted by Rumbaba (U13744896) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    It all went bit 'corporate' a while back but Jools is back on track -ish. Personally, I would ban all these bands from showing up mob-handed, with strings, brass, backing singers and whatever. If you are a 4 piece guitar band, then let's see how you cut it as a band.  Hmmmm

    I've seen Brian Setzer perform in concert.

    For part of the show he fronted a large "big band" (the Brian Setzer orchestra) which was very reminiscent of the type of band you would see backing Frank Sinatra or Louis Armstrong.

    This was complete with brass section, keyboards, backing singers.

    And Setzer played a straightforward mix of rock, rockabilly, as well as some jazz standards - even tossed in the Hawaii 50 theme song.

    Later in the show, he did a stripped down set with just the stand-up bass player and the drummer playing just a snare and one crass cymbal.

    He played a medley of Stray Cats tunes.

    Never once did I think Setzer couldnt cut it.

    In fact, the versality of performance and song writing styles made me think he could cut it at various levels and genres. 
    That's not quite the point I'm making GZ. I am not against big bands per se. I just think it is a bit of a cop out for a rock band like Kasabian to show up with a load of hired help.

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  • Message 34

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    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Monday, 18th November 2013

    smiley - ok Fair point

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  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Mr_Lightning (U15450350) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    I personally dont find that with Bjork. Its more of a tuneless drone.
     


    I liked her first album, but then she seemed to lose her sense of rhythm.

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  • Message 36

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    Posted by Baldinio (U2012448) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    I personally dont find that with Bjork. Its more of a tuneless drone.
     


    I liked her first album, but then she seemed to lose her sense of rhythm. 


    I think she was very good right up to Vespertine and then she started to experiment a bit more as most artists do as they mature.

    With Lady G I think the fact that she is a very good musician often gets overlooked because of her magpie style of music but as somebody suggested up thread every generation likes to reinvent the past.

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  • Message 37

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    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    What Lady Gaga is attempting to do is absolutely nothing new.

    David Bowie, Bjork and Maddona have done it all before, and with much greater effect.

    So long as televised media broadcasters continue to give her 'the oxygen of massive amounts of free publicity', Lady Gaga, et al, will all see it as both an incredibly cheap and effective way of promoting their latest album. 
    I'd say Lada Gaga has far surpassed anything done by Bjork.

    Never cared for Bjork, her style reminds me of Yoko Ono.

    Its not very musical to my ears anyway.

    At least with Gaga, Madonna, Bowie, there is some musicality that you can dance to, sing along with.

    I personally dont find that with Bjork. Its more of a tuneless drone. 
    I agree about Gaga, Madonna, Bowie and Bjork. They are all musician media manipulators

    Yoko Ono is not a musician.( as far as I am aware ) She is just a media manipulator who rode on John Lennon's coat-tails.

    I found Bjork enchanting. Far from being a tuneless drone, she was able to make a single word straddle a complex arpeggio. Her lyrics touched unexpected tenderness and vulnerability. The musical arrangements of her debut album 'Debut' were quite a revelation at the time.

    I listened to an interview with Bjork about the mathematics of music. She is a very perceptive, astute and delightful person with whom I would happily share a long conversation.

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  • Message 38

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    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    Yoko Ono is not a musician.( as far as I am aware ) She is just a media manipulator who rode on John Lennon's coat-tails. 
    Yoko was already famous before John met her when he attended her conceptual art exhibition in London.

    I'm sure I read somewhere that John credits Yoko for improving his singing, by showing him how to liberate his voice. I couldn't find that quote, but this is from the Rolling Stone interview:

    "Except for the track with Ornette Coleman from the past that we put on to show people that she wasn’t discovered by the Beatles and that she’s been around a few years. We got stuff of her with Cage, Ornette Coleman... we are going to put out “Oldies But Goldies” next for Yoko."

    www.jannswenner.com/...

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  • Message 39

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    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    Yoko Ono is not a musician.( as far as I am aware ) She is just a media manipulator who rode on John Lennon's coat-tails. 
    Yoko was already famous before John met her when he attended her conceptual art exhibition in London.

    I'm sure I read somewhere that John credits Yoko for improving his singing, by showing him how to liberate his voice. I couldn't find that quote, but this is from the Rolling Stone interview:

    "Except for the track with Ornette Coleman from the past that we put on to show people that she wasn’t discovered by the Beatles and that she’s been around a few years. We got stuff of her with Cage, Ornette Coleman... we are going to put out “Oldies But Goldies” next for Yoko."

    www.jannswenner.com/... 

    You may be right? I am not a fan of conceptual art which has nothing to do with musicianship (to my knowledge) about which the current discussion is based.

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  • Message 40

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    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    Yoko Ono is not a musician.( as far as I am aware ) She is just a media manipulator who rode on John Lennon's coat-tails. 
    Yoko was already famous before John met her when he attended her conceptual art exhibition in London.

    I'm sure I read somewhere that John credits Yoko for improving his singing, by showing him how to liberate his voice. I couldn't find that quote, but this is from the Rolling Stone interview:

    "Except for the track with Ornette Coleman from the past that we put on to show people that she wasn’t discovered by the Beatles and that she’s been around a few years. We got stuff of her with Cage, Ornette Coleman... we are going to put out “Oldies But Goldies” next for Yoko."

    www.jannswenner.com/... 

    You may be right? I am not a fan of conceptual art which has nothing to do with musicianship (to my knowledge) about which the current discussion is based. 

    Which is why I chose a quote which mentions Yoko performing with Ornette Coleman and John Cage.

    Another quote from the Lennon interview:

    " It’s as important as anything we ever did, and it is as important as anything the Stones or Townshend ever did. Listen to it, and you’ll hear what she is putting down. On “Cold Turkey” I’m getting towards it. I’m influenced by her music 1000 percent more than I ever was by anybody or anything. She makes music like you’ve never heard on earth...And when the musicians play with her, they’re inspired out of their skulls."

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  • Message 41

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    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Monday, 18th November 2013

    Looks like Yoko and her band appeared at a concert festival headline by Bjork a couple of years back in Iceland.

    And the cover photo shows Bjork chatting with Yoko.

    drownedinsound.com/n...rk-and-yoko-ono-join-iceland-airwaves-festival-bill

    My guess is that Bjork was highly intrumental in picking the line-up for the concert and I would not be surprised to learn that Bjork considers Yoko Ono as one of her musical influences.

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  • Message 42

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    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    " It’s as important as anything we ever did, and it is as important as anything the Stones or Townshend ever did. Listen to it, and you’ll hear what she is putting down. On “Cold Turkey” I’m getting towards it. I’m influenced by her music 1000 percent more than I ever was by anybody or anything. She makes music like you’ve never heard on earth...And when the musicians play with her, they’re inspired out of their skulls." 
    Here are some comments to Yoko Ono's contribution to "Cold Turkey" on youtube

    "i try not to hate ono yoko but these stupid noises she makes when she plays live with john just get to me...Hahahaha! Clapton offers a glare of utter disgust at Yoko here. "

    We are talking about different things, zencat.

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  • Message 43

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    Posted by GZ (U5310554) ** on Monday, 18th November 2013

    I believe the B-52's have also sited Yoko as a musical influence.

    You can hear it in songs like Rock Lobster.

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  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    " It’s as important as anything we ever did, and it is as important as anything the Stones or Townshend ever did. Listen to it, and you’ll hear what she is putting down. On “Cold Turkey” I’m getting towards it. I’m influenced by her music 1000 percent more than I ever was by anybody or anything. She makes music like you’ve never heard on earth...And when the musicians play with her, they’re inspired out of their skulls." 
    Here are some comments to Yoko Ono's contribution to "Cold Turkey" on youtube

    "i try not to hate ono yoko but these stupid noises she makes when she plays live with john just get to me...Hahahaha! Clapton offers a glare of utter disgust at Yoko here. "

    We are talking about different things, zencat. 

    It's easy to find quotes like that. here's one I found at the top of a google search for "Bjork Yoko Ono":

    "Bjork is over rated she sounds like yoko ono mixed with a dying animal played over mediocre techno or beats that can be made in 5 minutes off garage bands. Also bjork fans are so smug that they like the smell of their own farts".

    I can provide the link for that, if necessary.)

    Have you actually listened to Cold Turkey? Which bit did Yoko contribute?

    Reply to this message 44

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  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    Have you actually listened to Cold Turkey? Which bit did Yoko contribute?  Yes. I felt I had to listen to it out of courtesy to our previous post, and hence, the quotes.

    I am happy that you rate Yoko Ono very highly. I am not enjoying discussing Yoko Ono, whereas I will happily discuss Bjork, so I'll end our exchange here.

    Reply to this message 45

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  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by zencat (U14877400) on Monday, 18th November 2013

    Have you actually listened to Cold Turkey? Which bit did Yoko contribute?  Yes. I felt I had to listen to it out of courtesy to our previous post, and hence, the quotes.

    I am happy that you rate Yoko Ono very highly. I am not enjoying discussing Yoko Ono, whereas I will happily discuss Bjork, so I'll end our exchange here. 

    I haven't rated Yoko. What I think of her is not relevant. I was simply responding to your implied question about whether Yoko is a musician. All my replies simply quote John Lennon - who did rate her highly.

    Bringing it back on topic, Lady Gaga and Yoko share a stage at a concert which is also available on YouTube:

    Reply to this message 46

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  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by wolfie (U15842015) ** on Tuesday, 19th November 2013

    Of course her husband rated her highly...he wasnt going to tell the truth...was he...

    Reply to this message 47

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  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Tuesday, 19th November 2013

    >>Clapton offers a glare of utter disgust


    This is the same E Clapton who is trying to flog Fairisle shooting stockings and garter ties etc, to a scatter-gun selection of the unsuspecting British public from his ultra posh Piccadilly shop ?

    I think it is.

    Reply to this message 48

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  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) on Tuesday, 19th November 2013

    >>Clapton offers a glare of utter disgust


    This is the same E Clapton who is trying to flog Fairisle shooting stockings and garter ties etc, to a scatter-gun selection of the unsuspecting British public from his ultra posh Piccadilly shop ?

    I think it is. 

    >>Pancho offers a glare of utter disinterest


    ( actually it is quite interesting, Paul )

    Reply to this message 49

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  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by Paul Sherratt (U1632637) on Tuesday, 19th November 2013

    Yes Pancho Eric is ' joint ' proprietor of Dennis Thatcher's favourite shop, haunt of the Duke Of Wellington and ' you can fool a lot of the people most of the time', Damien ( not Geoff ) Hirst.

    It's at 19 Piccadilly should anyone feel the need to power dress in red ribbon braces and a rubberised Mackintosh, off you tootle !

    Reply to this message 50

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