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Trust Me I'm A Doctor

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by CardinalRacer (U14198622) on Thursday, 10th October 2013

    Trust me, I'm a satisfied viewer. What interesting topics and well presented. Can't wait for the next one.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by elwoodeneye (U10727501) on Thursday, 10th October 2013

    Trust me, I'm a satisfied viewer. What interesting topics and well presented. Can't wait for the next one.  Agreed , very watchable and informative , well presented without dumbing down , but also not too heavy .

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  • Message 3

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    Posted by Bethgem (U14263559) on Thursday, 10th October 2013

    Yes, I thought so too. Looking forward to the next one even though I cannot stand the annoying musical noises almost throughout the programme.

    It is what they think is necessary and they say viewers like it, but not me!

    Oh well, next week then. Mute will be used, subtitles will be on. smiley - grr

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Hy Dranger (U14569978) on Thursday, 10th October 2013

    Is this a new series or a repeat of Phil Hammond's original one from some years ago? I don't see it in my schedules, what channel is it on? The original (which I think was about 10 years ago) was very good I recall.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Hy Dranger (U14569978) on Thursday, 10th October 2013

    It's ok I've found it now (BBC2 20:00), it had gone off my EPG but I found it online. It seems to be unrelated to the original series.

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Thursday, 10th October 2013

    Trust me, I'm a satisfied viewer. What interesting topics and well presented. Can't wait for the next one.  Agreed , very watchable and informative , well presented without dumbing down , but also not too heavy .  Couldn't agree more. As someone who struggles with his BMI quite encouraging.

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by tickledpink (U1187147) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    My only disappointment (totally selfish) was that whilst emphasising getting betwee 7 to 8 hours sleep they didn't address deeply enough the problem of people who have sleep problems.
    I don't know what it is to have a full night's unbroken sleep, and if I've had 6 hours I consider that a plus.

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by BrightYangThing (U14627705) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    I understand your point tickled pink and I did feel that the sleep segment missed a lot of nuances of what a period of quality sleep really entails. But I think if fulfilled the remit of the programme, which is too look at basic health issues that get confusing reports and mis information circulating. It was interesting that all subjects felt and performed much better when they were allowed 7.5 - 8hr sleep a night rather than 1 hour less.

    I would have expected some better with less not more.

    Anyway, in all, I liked the programme though do wish, as with many others, they would complete one item then move on rather than keep switching back and forward. I know it is supposed to keep us tuned in but are so many people really that fickle?

    Well Done Michael Mosley and the team. Thought the non invasive brain surgery segment was brilliant.

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  • Message 9

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    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    I didn't see it all as I got in late and was watching sefgments using pause, but i liked what I saw, especially the Great Aspirin Debate

    I too though it was odd that they recycled Phil Hammond's title, without any nod in that direction

    I see this is another of the currently favoured BBC trilogies

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    I think Hammond's version was more of a half-hour weekly magazine, and I think in some ways I'd have preferred this to be more shorter programmes, with a longer run and more of a magazine rather than a very loosely themed documentary; we've got a lot of docs at teh moment

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  • Message 10

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    Posted by BrightYangThing (U14627705) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Yes, the aspirin segment was interesting. I am still in a group who cannot take aspirin or derivatives (they cause severe rash and vomiting) but a great many who consider them a risk should be able to do so with little long term harm. The stark outcome balance (can it make you a bit ill vs can it kill you) was an eye opener and not common in the medical fraternity.

    Off topic alert

    p.s. Sue, are on Fb. Advice re quails egg allergy please?

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by BrightYangThing (U14627705) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Oops. Forgot to add...
    Wonder if they will tackle the statins debate.

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Dermod (U14282701) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    The programme had a lot of interesting material. But I was not the least bit satisfied with the figures given for the (statistical) risk associated with different medications.

    To me they were too glib in that the various risk factors did not have a common base, e.g. the risk reduction effect attained by taking aspirin does not compare with that of statins, since they reduce two different risks.

    Unfortunately there was insufficient information rattled out at top speed in order to get to the 'opinion' as quickly as possible.

    Not remotely scientific!

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Oops. Forgot to add...
    Wonder if they will tackle the statins debate. 
    Still to watch the programme, but the main problem with statins for me is that I'm not allowed to eat grapefruit, which I love! smiley - smiley

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  • Message 14

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    Posted by incandescent (U14877400) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Annoying that they kept dipping in and out of the item on sleep - to keep us watching until the end. smiley - doh

    My friend took an aspirin a day until he was dashed off to hospital suffering from internal bleeding that almost killed him (caused by the aspirin, but the doctor who prescribed it gave him no warning).

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  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Interesting but very slow, we saw the same pictures over and over, and the way they strung out the results of the sleep experiment, as well as splitting into multiple segmants, was painful. Could have been like a lot of shows should be only 30mins.

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  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Vickytorious (U14098212) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    My friend took an aspirin a day until he was dashed off to hospital suffering from internal bleeding that almost killed him (caused by the aspirin, but the doctor who prescribed it gave him no warning). 

    I was surprised that the professor who advocates taking a 75mg aspirin a day actually said it was better to run the risk of an internal bleed which wouldn't be life threatening....but surely, as the above post shows, there is always the possibility of it being life threatening ? I have had a stomach ulcer in the past and so avoid aspirin even a small dose.

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  • Message 17

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    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    My friend took an aspirin a day until he was dashed off to hospital suffering from internal bleeding that almost killed him (caused by the aspirin, but the doctor who prescribed it gave him no warning). 

    I was surprised that the professor who advocates taking a 75mg aspirin a day actually said it was better to run the risk of an internal bleed which wouldn't be life threatening....but surely, as the above post shows, there is always the possibility of it being life threatening ? I have had a stomach ulcer in the past and so avoid aspirin even a small dose. 
    There's a significant difference between life-threatening and fatal

    As the Prof said, treated bleeds though nasty are only very rarely fatal, and you tend to make a full recovery following treatment, with no nasty after effects
    Whereas even a treated myocardial infarction or stroke is fairly likely to kill you, and if it doesn’t kill you it can (& probably will) leave you with significant sequelae (i.e. with ongoing issues)

    Of the two I’d personally prefer to take aspirin to a statin for routine prophylaxis; in fact I take neither as aspirin is not suitable for me, and I’m not at a praticularly high risk of vascular problems

    I wouldn’t however hesitate to take a statin if there was a specific reason for me to do so

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  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by fortrosian (U2001738) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Found this really interesting, especially the section on the non invasive brain operation.

    Would also like to see a section about Statins. I am not a doc botherer, but would like to know the full ins and outs...

    smiley - biggrin

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  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by supernanauna (U5159866) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    I wondered if that brain op burnt the skin of the scalp - they didn't mention that one way or the other.

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  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    I wondered if that brain op burnt the skin of the scalp - they didn't mention that one way or the other.  No. they explained, the ultrasound was focused from over 1000 point sources int the helmet that all met inside the brain, so none of the sources had enough power to create the heat until they met up

    That was the point

    It's the same principle as those solar furnaces that use a parabolic reflector to make one point hot enough to melt metal

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by supernanauna (U5159866) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Yes you're right - my brain didn't make the connection - thank you.

    The result of the op was amazing - I've seen that sort of result before with conventional brain surgery where they use a probe to kill off the part of the brain that's causing the problem - but to see it done in such a non-invasive way was amazing.

    Well done to those doctors.

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  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    I actually cheered - such a smiley - magic result, and he was THE Southern gent wasn't he?

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  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by the_cleaner--still a man (U3423083) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Annoying that they kept dipping in and out of the item on sleep - to keep us watching until the end. smiley - doh

    My friend took an aspirin a day until he was dashed off to hospital suffering from internal bleeding that almost killed him (caused by the aspirin, but the doctor who prescribed it gave him no warning). 
    "Annoying that they kept dipping in and out of the item on sleep - to keep us watching until the end. "

    Maybe to stop people...just 'dipping' into the programme.smiley - winkeye


    Great programme - liked the info on the Defibrillators, and that when you phone 999, they can say where your nearest public one is, if it happens outside.smiley - cool

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  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Drsdaughter (U12521046) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    I am careful about taking any medicines but in particular aspirin. I have had two very large bruises ,one of which covered an area of my left leg from my hip to my knee cap. It was huge. I was told in no uncertain terms not to take aspirin for the pain because of its blood thinning qualities. I am a bad bruiser and it is not good for me. My aunt has a very low dose every day and she has not shown any ill affects. My late father told me that any drug that has a result must have some side affects in some people because of their body chemistry. No-two people are the same. My sister is on medication for high blood pressure and she cannot eat grapefruit anymore. It was one of her favourite fruits. I am luckily on no medication but I have had a recent scare. My twin is my opposite I am going to try to see this programme on the IPlayer.

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  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    There was some of the obvious annoyances, but they were easily outweighed by the content.

    The CPR feature was good, even if the guy doing the compressions wasn't in time to, added, music smiley - smiley but it's a good point well made and who wouldn't want to disco while simultaneously saving a life?

    Although oldish news now the non-invasive brain surgery feature was very good, especially the subject - a delightful man - who you just know will make the most of the good work done for him. It is something that could probably sustain a whole Horizon programme alone.

    As could the Aspirin feature, which I felt a little short changed on.

    With the sleep feature I don't thing that was particularly ground breaking stuff, so I didn't pay much attention (I manage well on five) but did they talk about lifestyle and habits? No amount of sleep is going to be great if you drink a double espresso and have a fry up right before you go to bed.

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  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by designengineer (U11181100) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    There was some of the obvious annoyances, but they were easily outweighed by the content.

    The CPR feature was good, even if the guy doing the compressions wasn't in time to, added, music smiley - smiley but it's a good point well made and who wouldn't want to disco while simultaneously saving a life?

    Although oldish news now the non-invasive brain surgery feature was very good, especially the subject - a delightful man - who you just know will make the most of the good work done for him. It is something that could probably sustain a whole Horizon programme alone.

    As could the Aspirin feature, which I felt a little short changed on.

    With the sleep feature I don't thing that was particularly ground breaking stuff, so I didn't pay much attention (I manage well on five) but did they talk about lifestyle and habits? No amount of sleep is going to be great if you drink a double espresso and have a fry up right before you go to bed. 
    We were taught "Nellie the Elephant" for CPR timing, and it's obviously a popular choice as it's even mentioned in Wikipedia's entry for "Nellie the Elephant".

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  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by tickledpink (U1187147) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    There was some of the obvious annoyances, but they were easily outweighed by the content.

    The CPR feature was good, even if the guy doing the compressions wasn't in time to, added, music smiley - smiley but it's a good point well made and who wouldn't want to disco while simultaneously saving a life?

    Although oldish news now the non-invasive brain surgery feature was very good, especially the subject - a delightful man - who you just know will make the most of the good work done for him. It is something that could probably sustain a whole Horizon programme alone.

    As could the Aspirin feature, which I felt a little short changed on.

    With the sleep feature I don't thing that was particularly ground breaking stuff, so I didn't pay much attention (I manage well on five) but did they talk about lifestyle and habits? No amount of sleep is going to be great if you drink a double espresso and have a fry up right before you go to bed. 
    Interesting point you make on sleep, I'd posted earlier on not getting the recommended dose, I've just come to accept that in the 20+ years I've had disturbed sleep, I haven't, as far as I'm aware, it hasn't done me any harm.

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  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    We were taught "Nellie the Elephant" for CPR timing, and it's obviously a popular choice as it's even mentioned in Wikipedia's entry for "Nellie the Elephant".  Me too but the younger generation wouldn't know that.

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  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Jeff (U13971268) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Although oldish news now the non-invasive brain surgery feature was very good, especially the subject - a delightful man - who you just know will make the most of the good work done for him. 
    I'm sure he will. It must have cost him a fortune, seeing where it took place.

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  • Message 30

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    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Although oldish news now the non-invasive brain surgery feature was very good, especially the subject - a delightful man - who you just know will make the most of the good work done for him. 
    I'm sure he will. It must have cost him a fortune, seeing where it took place. 
    As I understand it the first 72 patients, of which he was one I think, were selected to take part and so paid nothing.

    But, sure, it'll be expensive but they're getting it done.

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  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by incandescent (U14877400) on Friday, 11th October 2013

    Although oldish news now the non-invasive brain surgery feature was very good, especially the subject - a delightful man - who you just know will make the most of the good work done for him. 
    I'm sure he will. It must have cost him a fortune, seeing where it took place. 

    Not necessarily. This kind of treatment is the sort of thing covered by medical insurance.

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  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Saturday, 12th October 2013

    Although oldish news now the non-invasive brain surgery feature was very good, especially the subject - a delightful man - who you just know will make the most of the good work done for him. 
    I'm sure he will. It must have cost him a fortune, seeing where it took place. 

    Not necessarily. This kind of treatment is the sort of thing covered by medical insurance. 
    The treatment was described as "experimental", and I understood it was part of a clinical trial

    In which case he or his insurer would not have had to pay for the operation, only for some of the ancillary care.

    You wouldn't want to have to pay for a dozen doctors for 4 hours!

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  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Tafkaj (U3674656) on Tuesday, 15th October 2013

    [For those who suggested I'm an idiot for opening another thread on this programme when one already existed, when I searched for it nothing came up. I've just searched agai and STILL there are no search results! When the BBC search engine works properly, THEN you can call me an idiot ...

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    And, Dee, like everyone else, I supsect, I don't take kindly to my threads being closed without some explanation - I realise it was probably closed because it was a duplicate thread, but as I said above, if the search engine isn't even capable of finding an existing thread entitled Trust Me, I'm A Doctor (with or without the comma!) then it's not my fault ... And yet another BBC bod is being paid for doing his job poorly!

    So, this is the gist of my post on that thread:]


    YET AGAIN, an otherwise good (and useful) programme was ruined by that bloody annoying music tinkling on in the background!

    And why was there no full-face shot of, for example, Katerina Woolf (sleep specialist) when she was talking, the camera lingering (as per the current 'documentary' template) on the face of the presenter nodding and listening?

    And as for Gabriel Weston ... Well, there are presenters and there are presenters - she's neither. smiley - sadface

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  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by old git now over 70 (U14213449) on Tuesday, 15th October 2013

    Annoying that they kept dipping in and out of the item on sleep - to keep us watching until the end. smiley - doh

    My friend took an aspirin a day until he was dashed off to hospital suffering from internal bleeding that almost killed him (caused by the aspirin, but the doctor who prescribed it gave him no warning). 
    re Aspirin our Doctors either give Disolveable or Aspirin that is supposed to pass through the Stomach and disolve further on

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  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Bethgem (U14263559) on Tuesday, 15th October 2013

    Really? I didn't know that! Well now the world will know after you telling us.

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  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Guv-nor (U7476305) ** on Thursday, 17th October 2013

    Trust Me I'm A Doctor episode 2 tonight.
    Thu 17 Oct 2013
    20:00
    BBC Two
    Are vitamin pills money down the loo? Should we all be signing up to private health checks? Will antibiotics cure back pain? And does getting cold make you catch one?

    And more www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

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  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by madauntydawn (U6675998) on Thursday, 17th October 2013

    Bump

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  • Message 38

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    Posted by madauntydawn (U6675998) on Thursday, 17th October 2013

    It made me want to visit Chester, it looks very pretty.

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  • Message 39

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    Posted by The Man Who Watched Telly (U15436784) ** on Thursday, 17th October 2013

    I found the pop music soundtrack unnecessary and annoying.

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  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) ** on Thursday, 17th October 2013

    I found the pop music soundtrack unnecessary and annoying. 
    It served to remind me it was not 'The Sopranos"

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  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) ** on Thursday, 17th October 2013

    I found the pop music soundtrack unnecessary and annoying. 
    It served to remind me it was not 'The Sopranos" 
    sorry.. wrong thread.

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  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Hy Dranger (U14569978) on Thursday, 17th October 2013

    This programme seems like a retread of the BBC1 Cherry Healy one on heath and food etc, only not quite as erudite!!! As the presenter laid out his day's food on the ground in a shopping arcade I found myself asking, Is this really BBC2 I am watching?

    We were reassured that we can get our recommended daily amounts from our normal diet but the question of whether the average real life diet is adequate was left to a passing soundbite from the pill manufacturers and not enquired into. Nor did they examine whether the RDAs are really the optimum amounts. Just because I don't have scurvy doesn't mean I have the optimum amount of vitamin C, only that it's enough to stave off a deficiency disease. Similarly there is a large body of medical research data which suggests the RDA of Vitamin D should be increased by 5 or 10 times! But such issues were skipped over. (Needless to say this has been dealt with in depth on that serious science channel, Radio 4, which is how I know about it!) (Personally I suspect the issue with vitamin D is that the RDA was set 50 years ago at a time when people spent much more time outdoors and got most of their vitamin D by the action of sunlight on the skin). Anyhow, all in all a rather superficial and silly programme I thought, which seemed largely concerned with trotting out the standard establishment line on these things.

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  • Message 43

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    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) ** on Thursday, 17th October 2013

    Anyhow, all in all a rather superficial and silly programme I thought, which seemed largely concerned with trotting out the standard establishment line on these things. 

    I intend to adopt the practice of standing by my desk for intervals. If I find a real benefit, I shall challenge your claim that this is a rather superficial and silly programme. I'll be back

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  • Message 44

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    Posted by JanH (U14017596) on Friday, 18th October 2013

    I used to volunteer in a charity shop and would spend four hours standing behind a counter for a minimum of three days a week.
    In the eighteen months since I left I have put on a stone in weightsmiley - yikes without a change in my diet but I do sit a great deal more than I have ever done before, I find it very easy to believe that standing is better for us than sitting.

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  • Message 45

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    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) ** on Friday, 18th October 2013

    I used to volunteer in a charity shop and would spend four hours standing behind a counter for a minimum of three days a week.
    In the eighteen months since I left I have put on a stone in weightsmiley - yikes without a change in my diet but I do sit a great deal more than I have ever done before, I find it very easy to believe that standing is better for us than sitting. 

    smiley - smiley JanH you are like my conscience. I just read your post and have just stood up at my desk

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  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Friday, 18th October 2013

    Maybe it's an old wive's tale, but I was always led to believe that people who spent their working day standing up tended to suffer from varicose veins.

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  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) on Friday, 18th October 2013

    I found the pop music soundtrack unnecessary and annoying. 

    Because I am a health and fitness nut (not) I watch this in the gym...it is a counterpoint to watching GBBO, on Tuesday, while also in the gym. For everything there needs to be balance. Anyhow, I got thinking, while watching this, does the sound/music editor ever think, as they are doing "their bit", "actually I won't put any music in, this section, at all".

    And then, after a pause, they fall off their chair and roll around on the floor laughing.

    The womb transplant feature was fascinating. I admit I groaned when, surgeon, Gabriele Weston said "I can't believe how excited I am to see how he does it", having just simply described what any type of transplant operation would be but, then later, she said "the womb is to be put into the body of a woman who was once carried inside it". I nearly fell off the treadmill. That is something else.

    And the womb needs to expand up to 20 to 30 times during pregnancy? Ladies, I salute you.

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  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) ** on Friday, 18th October 2013

    I used to volunteer in a charity shop and would spend four hours standing behind a counter for a minimum of three days a week.
    In the eighteen months since I left I have put on a stone in weightsmiley - yikes without a change in my diet but I do sit a great deal more than I have ever done before, I find it very easy to believe that standing is better for us than sitting. 

    smiley - smiley JanH you are like my conscience. I just read your post and have just stood up at my desk 
    And, thanks to you, JanH, I have stood for the past hour. Now it's sitting time again.

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  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Dee_host (U15846799) on Friday, 18th October 2013

    And, Dee, like everyone else, I supsect, I don't take kindly to my threads being closed without some explanation. 

    Sorry Tafkaj. I thought, given the way the thread had gone and the number of links to this one, that an explanation from me was redundant. smiley - smiley

    I didn't expect to see you back there, just wanted to stop anyone else bumping it.

    Reply to this message 49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Friday, 18th October 2013

    I found the pop music soundtrack unnecessary and annoying.  Same here, it was just padding to go with all the superflous images we kept seeing over and over again, and the repeated dialogue.

    Made the whole thing so slow.

    Nice idea for a programme with some good stuff but as last week padded out to an hour.

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