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Disabled discrimination on sets

Messages: 1 - 45 of 45
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by rainbird (U14783754) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Why does the BBC discriminate against disabled contestants on game shows by using sets that are not wheelchair friendly.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    And your evidence for this is what?

    This is a very serious allegation to make and if proven is probably illegal -so please elaborate.

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  • Message 3

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    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    I do not understand how you can possibly make a statement like the one in the opening post.
    I am willing to bet that all sets are either wheelchair friendly or can easily be adapted to meet the needs of disabled contestants.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by bethb63 (U13675101) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Not joining the accusation, but I would be interested to see an answer on this.

    As a wheelchair user myself, I do observe that some sets appear more accessible than others, and I'm curious what protocols they have in place.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Garrypenny (U9662607) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    I've seen wheelchair users on some game shows - I admit though, not on 'Total Wipeout'.

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    What on earth makes you think that rainbird? Is it something that you've just assumed?



    All BBC sets and tours can be accessed and used by people with disabilities.

    www.bbc.co.uk/showsa...

    The BBC aims to truly reflect the nations, regions and diverse communities we serve, and to involve all sections of our audience in making shows.

    We want to encourage people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities to apply to participate as members of studio audiences and contributors to programmes, to tour our buildings and to join us at events.

    We regularly audit BBC buildings to ensure accessibility for all visitors with disabilities and will, where possible, make reasonable adjustments for disabled people wishing to take part in BBC activities.  

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Not joining the accusation, but I would be interested to see an answer on this.

    As a wheelchair user myself, I do observe that some sets appear more accessible than others, and I'm curious what protocols they have in place. 



    Sets and all BBC public and private areas for performers, participants and audience members, are assessed for accessibility.

    I work at the BBC and I think it's one of the things that the BBC are very good at, and take great attention over.

    If extra accessibility - over and above what was already there - were needed to suit someone's specific needs the BBC would make every effort to meet the needs.

    Having said that, the BBC Buildings are already accessible, and facilities for the disabled are provided at all venues.

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) ** on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    I am willing to bet that all sets are either wheelchair friendly or can easily be adapted to meet the needs of disabled contestants. 
    Sets aren't usually seen completely in the round on camera, which is pretty much what you'd have to do to be sure that they didn't allow disabled access.

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Just look at the " be in a show" web page www.bbc.co.uk/showsa...
    It has the following note

    The BBC aims to truly reflect the nations, regions and diverse communities we serve, and to involve all sections of our audience in making shows. We want to encourage people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities to apply to participate as members of studio audiences and contributors to programmes, to tour our buildings and to join us at events. We regularly audit BBC buildings to ensure accessibility for all visitors with disabilities and will, where possible, make reasonable adjustments for disabled people wishing to take part in BBC activities.

    Just because a set looks as if it would not take someone with mobility issues it does not mean that they cannot ... Remember mastermind where " the chair" was removed to allow a wheel chair access.

    But can you see that a person is disabled .... Perhaps ..

    I have looked in the ouch podcast to see if there is anything there
    www.bbc.co.uk/podcas...
    Or on ouch blogs ... Again without any results ..
    www.bbc.co.uk/news/b...

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by bethb63 (U13675101) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Not joining the accusation, but I would be interested to see an answer on this.

    As a wheelchair user myself, I do observe that some sets appear more accessible than others, and I'm curious what protocols they have in place. 



    Sets and all BBC public and private areas for performers, participants and audience members, are assessed for accessibility.

    I work at the BBC and I think it's one of the things that the BBC are very good at, and take great attention over.

    If extra accessibility - over and above what was already there - were needed to suit someone's specific needs the BBC would make every effort to meet the needs.

    Having said that, the BBC Buildings are already accessible, and facilities for the disabled are provided at all venues. 
    Thanks for this, Peta. Something I've wondered but never got round to investigating is when they offer the ticket giveaways for concerts at places like Maida Vale, are there wheelchair seats available?

    As you say all venues do, I may now be inspired to enter!

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Yes there are! Go for it! smiley - biggrin

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by old git now over 70 (U14213449) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    I've seen wheelchair users on some game shows - I admit though, not on 'Total Wipeout'.  Off course you would not see disabled contestants on Total Wipeout.
    it is a highly physical series of games, in fact it is a wonder some of the contestant are not seriously injured in it.
    Noel Edmonds Manages to have wheel chair contestants on his show on Channel 4 , some even need some one to do sign language for them & I am sure if needed the BBC could do likewise.
    Perfection could easily do disabled.( but it is recorded well in advance as the answer to a question on it stated that the present Monarch of the Netherlands was not King William but his mother) yes that bit is off topic but the rest is not

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) ** on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Whether or not a set is wheelchair accessible depends upon whether or not a studio is, first, wheelchair accessible. Not all studios are new, or are in particularly new buildings, and where most will have had the necessary adaptations made, it is not always possible to do so.

    To use the example Old Git gave, Perfection, it is now made at Pacific Quay studios, in Glasgow, which is a new building and, almost certainly, is fully wheelchair accessible. When Perfection was first made it was done so at The London Studios, at ITV's London TV Centre. It is an old building and not all of the studios there are necessarily fully accessible, though adaptations have been made where possible (it's a hard building to get around at the best of times!).

    Not having made adaptations, due to physical constraints, does not amount to discrimination. If, for example, a programme made at Pacific Quay had sets that were not accessible, and without good reason, one could point the finger. But that is a long, long way to saying that the BBC is actively discriminating. Especially without citing an example.

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Garrypenny (U9662607) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Off course you would not see disabled contestants on Total Wipeout. 

    I was thinking about them being on the course.

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  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) ** on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    No sign of the opening post, maybe the disabled access isn't good enough.smiley - winkeye

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  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) ** on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    This is a very serious allegation to make and if proven is probably illegal 

    Not illegal, as such, but could leave the BBC, or any organisation, open to a claim for discrimination, and damages.

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Rhoces (U11212688) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    I remember a blind lady on Mastermind using her cane to walk to the black chair and contestantsin wheelchairs.

    What shows is Rainbird concerned about??

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  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by mismatched (U14242423) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    There have been a number of disabled contestants on Pointless. Also on one programme an older man was obviously distressed by standing so was provided with a stool.

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  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) ** on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    an older man was obviously distressed by standing so was provided with a stool. 
    That could be me. Though I take the view that if you invite me into your "home" you should be offering me a seat. smiley - winkeye

    I have been racking my brains and, the obvious (and already mentioned) aside, I cannot think of any programme that the OP could possibly be referring to. And I don't expect hear from them what it is they are thinking of.

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  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by mismatched (U14242423) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    I know some disabled athletes who would relish the thought of Wheelchair Wipeout. Wheelchair Rugby is not called "Murder Ball" for nothing

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Lighten Up (U15801316) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    Rainbird is one of these people who are angry. Unsure about what exactly. But has a vague sense of injustice. Wants to attack something or somebody. But needs to disguise their negative impulses by attaching themselves to a virtuous cause. Discovers the topic of discrimination against the disabled and the lack of disabled access. Lashes out at the first thing they see - a BBC prog. Unfortunately it transpires that the facts are against them. The BBC provides plenty of disabled access.

    Rainbird is still angry. Frustrated. Still doesn't know the real source of their anger.

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  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Chezzie (U1159267) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    Not only is there plenty of access wheelchair users usually have front seats in the audience. I have seen plenty of disabled contestants on shows too, perhaps it is not always obvious.

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  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Symberta Ladygarden (U14259814) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    Off the top of my napper, The National Lottery In It To Win It set would prove to be an obstacle course for a wheelchair bound contestant, how to get from the main seated area to the contestant's row ? lest poor Dale [ with his back ] piggy-back them over the dance floor area.

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  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by sherisgirl (U1687779) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    Absolutely rot and the opening poster is that concerned never to be heard of again, let alone have any back up for complaining.

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  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Lee (U1149673) ** on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    Off the top of my napper, The National Lottery In It To Win It set would prove to be an obstacle course for a wheelchair bound contestant, how to get from the main seated area to the contestant's row ? lest poor Dale [ with his back ] piggy-back them over the dance floor area.  I'm sure they could easily make reasonable adjustments to the set should it be necessary.

    Reply to this message 25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by banjax (U14499510) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    The BBC does not discriminate against the disabled. It employs a considerable number of staff who have a disability and all BBC offices and studios can accommodate those who are disabled as the law demands.

    Wheelchair uses for example have easy access to studios – for members of a studio audience there are designated areas for wheelchairs which are usually at the front of the audience seating and afford an excellent view of the proceedings. Defence Correspondent Frank Gardner is wheelchair bound and is regularly seen in television studios. Camera mountings are heavy and like Darleks and the wheelchair bound they cannot ‘climb’ stairs and yet can move from studio to studio just like folk who are disabled. I think that the OP’s comment is mischievous and suspect.

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  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by bethb63 (U13675101) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    Off the top of my napper, The National Lottery In It To Win It set would prove to be an obstacle course for a wheelchair bound contestant, how to get from the main seated area to the contestant's row ? lest poor Dale [ with his back ] piggy-back them over the dance floor area.  In It To Win It is the one that usually sets me wondering about this question because of the narrow (uncomfortable looking) chairs the contestants sit on. I suppose one would be removed from winners row to accommodate a wheelchair.

    And how big are those pods on Who Dares Wins?

    Also, though not a BBC show, Who Wants to be a Millionaire? It's staged so contestants sit on that high chair. Have they ever had to remove it - or even just had someone unable to clamber up?

    For most sets, accessibility doesn't look impossible, but I would just be interested to see how they actually accomplish it.

    The best I remember was 15 to 1. They very regularly had contestants with disabilities.

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  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by rainbird (U14783754) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    This is the impression I get from watching game shows. Message 27 gives a perfect example.

    Others are "Pointless" where there is little room for able bodied contestants to exchange places, let alone wheelchair users.

    "Perfection" has contestants on high stools.

    Maybe if more wheelchair users were selected to appear this impression would not be generated and set adaptation could be seen.

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  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by rainbird (U14783754) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    For your information, I've been away and not been able to reply till now.

    As for "absolute rot", have you viewed these programmes from a wheelchair users point of view.?

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  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by puppydogeyes (U14659366) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    Your impressions rainbird are based on perceptions and are pure speculation.

    Can you provide any concrete evidence that disabled or wheelchair users have been positively discriminated against from appearing on these shows other than the fact you think the sets could not be adapted or adjusted for those.

    Because they have not appeared does not mean they are being discriminated against-it could be any number of unrelated factors.

    You need to prove your case.

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  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Pampy (U1022836) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    This is the impression I get from watching game shows. Message 27 gives a perfect example.

    Others are "Pointless" where there is little room for able bodied contestants to exchange places, let alone wheelchair users.

    "Perfection" has contestants on high stools.

    Maybe if more wheelchair users were selected to appear this impression would not be generated and set adaptation could be seen. 
    Don't forget that most shows of this type aren't shown live - any awkwardness in contestants moving about (as per your example of Pointless) would be edited out.

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  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) ** on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    This is the impression I get from watching game shows. Message 27 gives a perfect example.

    Others are "Pointless" where there is little room for able bodied contestants to exchange places, let alone wheelchair users.

    "Perfection" has contestants on high stools.

    Maybe if more wheelchair users were selected to appear this impression would not be generated and set adaptation could be seen. 

    Oh, it's an impression, now. Your OP had it as a certainty.

    You say "if more wheelchair users were selected", but surely it would be a more valid enquiry to ask "how many wheelchair users apply?" and take it from there, no? Surely that's better than launching into an accusation without foundation.

    The rest lies in something that this messageboard lacks: editing.

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  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    Hi rainbird

    Thank you for at least coming back to explain what you meant by your initial posting.

    I can assure you that the BBC does not discriminate against wheelchair users on BBC TV programmes.

    One thing that you might like to consider is that some people who use wheelchairs might prefer the BBC to not make a big deal out of it. The BBC reporter Frank Gardner uses a wheelchair, but when he's on set it's often very hard to see that that's the case. It's entirely possible that there are more wheelchair users and people with disabilities on programmes than you can see, and they appreciate the BBC *not* making a big thing of it - "Hey look, we have a wheelchair user on our programme!" That would be crass, wouldn't it?

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  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) ** on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    The BBC reporter Frank Gardner uses a wheelchair, but when he's on set it's often very hard to see that that's the case.  
    What, you mean he doesn't have neon tubes attached to his wheels, LED tipped whip aerials and a horn that plays "La Cucaracha"?

    What a let down!

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  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    Plus a big sign round his neck saying "The BBC is beastly to me" smiley - laugh

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  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by beerhead (U15819967) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    From what I've seen skinny, bordering on anorexic young women are very over represented among presenters on telly. Agreed disabled people people are under represented (in proportion to their percentage of the population), as are... fat people, ugly people and old people... and people with regional accents.

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  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    Not all disabilities are obvious, so I think it's impossible to know just by watching your TV beerbrain.

    Many disabled people do not work, for health reasons, so that also needs to be taken into consideration.

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  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by beerhead (U15819967) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    Haven't seen many guide dogs on tv, or deaf people using sign language being translated by a speaking person. On that subject, how about a quiz for signers with subtitles for hearing people. Think outside the box BBC, you're meant to be a public service broadcaster (which I assume includes disabled people, you can't just push them into a "minority ghetto", you should include them in mainstream tv).

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  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    Why would you want to see a guide dog on TV? Gary O'Donoghue is blind but he doesn't parade his dog about, if he has one, perhaps he hasn't.

    There are lots of disabled people working at the BBC, but presenter might be a hard role for someone with, for example, hearing difficulties.

    Just because you're not aware that they're there, doesn't mean that they're not.

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  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by Rhoces (U11212688) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    Not all disabilities are obvious, so I think it's impossible to know just by watching your TV beerbrain.

    Many disabled people do not work, for health reasons, so that also needs to be taken into consideration. 
    You only have to watch paralympic sport to see the huge range of disabilities from physical to educational......seen and unseen.

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  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Bananas are the best (U15650112) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    Haven't seen many guide dogs on tv, or deaf people using sign language being translated by a speaking person. On that subject, how about a quiz for signers with subtitles for hearing people. Think outside the box BBC, you're meant to be a public service broadcaster (which I assume includes disabled people, you can't just push them into a "minority ghetto", you should include them in mainstream tv). 

    www.mirror.co.uk/new...

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  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    www.bbc.co.uk/ariel/...

    Poetry series with deaf presenters comes to CBeebies

    All of the presenters are new to television and profoundly deaf
    The BBC is going to broadcast a show featuring children's poetry translated into British Sign Language by four deaf presenters.

    Magic Hands will mix sign language, spoken word, music and vibrant animation into five-minute packages.

    Series producer Judith Bunting said: 'Translating modern and traditional poems for children into BSL on such a scale is a first. There are deaf poets and deaf theatre companies but no national television company has ever tried translating children's poetry into BSL.'

    The producer added that it has been a 'mammoth task' to take verse and turn it into a series of performances.

    Each episode of Magic Hands is based around a single verse, interpreted for children.

    It will feature poetry from the likes of Robert Louis Stephenson, Maya Angelou, Christina Rossetti and Shakespeare.

    Controller of CBeebies Kay Benbow said: 'The mix of sign language, music and lively animation creates spellbinding poetry that we are sure all our young viewers will enjoy."

    The Magic Hands presenters - Ashley, Donna, Aimee and Simon - are all new to television and have been profoundly deaf since birth.

    The 30-part series made for CBeebies by Remark Ltd, a company that is owned, staffed and run by people who are deaf. It will air in the spring.

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  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    Haven't seen many guide dogs on tv, or deaf people using sign language being translated by a speaking person. On that subject, how about a quiz for signers with subtitles for hearing people. Think outside the box BBC, you're meant to be a public service broadcaster (which I assume includes disabled people, you can't just push them into a "minority ghetto", you should include them in mainstream tv).  I am registered Deaf Disabled but can hear when wearing two high powered, digital hearing aids.
    If you saw me you would probably not know that I have this disability unless you caught sight of the aids. Not all deaf people require signers or have speech difficulties. I am sure the same applies for others who face different challenges.
    Just about every programme now is available with subtitles, some better than others, the news subtitles are often hilarious.

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  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) ** on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    I saw a Pointless recently and the contestants didn't change places at the podium because one was disabled, I'm sure that was the choice of the disabled person not the BBC.They've had plenty of disabled people on Bargain Hunt with no apparent problems at all, you can accuse the BBC of a lot of things but not being disabled unfriendly.

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  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by MsA (U14389417) on Saturday, 24th August 2013

    Why does the BBC discriminate against disabled contestants on game shows by using sets that are not wheelchair friendly.  The BBC are highly sensitive to the needs of disabled people. There are many accusation one could make about the BBC, but discrimination is not one of them. Apart from ageism that is...!

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