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The Incredible Spice men.

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Messages: 1 - 47 of 47
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by ZIP-IT-SHRIMPY (U15436784) on Monday, 19th August 2013

    Yet another cookery/food based programme on the channel that's supposed to provide unique programmes. The people who run the BBC clearly only have 3 hobbies; cooking, antiques and buying property. These types of programmes are on too much, what about giving other hobbies and past times a look in.

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Monday, 19th August 2013

    There are too many silly cooking competitions in my view

    But this isn't one of those, and I'm really looking forward to it

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Tonight, 20.30, BBC 2

    I have eaten at Cyrus Todiwalla’s restaurant and had the good luck to meet him several times, there’s nobody I’d prefer to have explain the use of spices to me

    There's plenty of gardening on the TV too, don't you count that as a hobby? And there are motoring programmes, and all levels of sport - aren't those pastimes?

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Monday, 19th August 2013

    There is not plenty of gardening on tv as well -an hour in the Summer period -providing there is no snooker or tennis or proms- precious little in the winter if at all

    A makeover show of 6 episodes on the other side

    It does not compare to the hours of cooking ,antique or house moving shows in any shape or form

    Just putting the record straight smiley - smiley

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by eviled2 (U14446578) on Monday, 19th August 2013

    A couple of guys adding spice to traditional dishes like fish and chips...wow, more licence payers money well spent!
    Scraping the barrel here by the sounds of it.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Monday, 19th August 2013

    Looking forward to this - Spice Boys.smiley - laugh

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Testcard (U1164920) on Monday, 19th August 2013

    Cyrus the Virus?

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by BrightYangThing (U14627705) on Monday, 19th August 2013

    Hmmm. Withholding judgement. A bit like hairy bikers (all pally, nicknames and liberally sprinkled with 'My God's'). Spiced food is lovely, but not sure why it can't be asian spiced food per see. When I want Fish and Chips I want just that -- trad British Fish and Chips tat tastes mostly of oil and frying.

    I may be missing the point but will give it a go again next week. Pretty harmless though I think it may get a bit irritating.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Sploink (U9993613) on Monday, 19th August 2013

    I thought this was a great prog smiley - ok And I'm normally not keen on cookery progs. The presenters were pleasant to watch - no bullying or swearing, and really knew their subject. It was a privilege to be shown how to cook with spices by real experts. It gave me a few ideas for my own cooking. The only downside was that it made me feel hungry! smiley - drool

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Chezzie (U1159267) on Monday, 19th August 2013

    I thought this was a great prog smiley - ok And I'm normally not keen on cookery progs. The presenters were pleasant to watch - no bullying or swearing, and really knew their subject. It was a privilege to be shown how to cook with spices by real experts. It gave me a few ideas for my own cooking. The only downside was that it made me feel hungry! smiley - drool  I thought it was a really enjoyable programme and was also reminded of the Hairy Bikers but I think that was just because of the camaraderie between them.

    I haven't seen any trailers and was just lucky that I started zapping when Fight Back Britain came on.

    Looking forward to next week.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Did not really enjoy this, the constant calling one and other "Chef" started to get on my nerves and I fail to see the point of buying what is described as some of the best tasting pork in the world from the London pig and then smothering it in spices. I bet that piece of meat would have been superb just roasted. Also fish and chips is a great dish without spices, why not leave it alone?
    I am also beginning to think that there are too many cookery programmes on TV even though it is a passion of mine. Today we have another series of GBBO starting, Celebrity Masterchef is on, Saturday Kitchen in various guises, and others.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by scientistamafier (U3083937) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    I liked it. I found the recipes easy to follow and the camera focussed on the food when needed (all too often on other shows they would explain some vital technique whilst the camera focussed on a pot plant or the presenters left ear).

    I haven't looked yet but I'm hoping the recipes will be on the BBC food pages.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Chezzie (U1159267) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Obviously this is a programme for spice lovers and new ideas for traditional recipes, I love good fish and chips but I will definitely try spicing mine up next time, subtle spices used properly will bring out the flavour of food rather than mask it which is why I love the idea of learning from the masters, these two chefs know everything there is to know about the use of spices. I think it is a really original programme and different from anything that has been on before. One of Valentine Warner's ideas was chilli powder, salt and lemon juice on water melon, delicious!

    I think that the reason why there are more cookery programmes on these days is because so many people are interested in it, the UK has some of the best chefs and restaurants in the world and cookery books fly off the shelves, the cookery book shelves here in the Netherlands a full of British chefs and all the programmes are very popular and shown on Dutch channels even though most people have BBC 1 in their basic TV package..

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by brora (U14803827) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Although I agree there are far too many cookery programmes on the TV we don't have to watch them all (I certainly don't). I enjoyed this programme though and really, really wanted to eat the fish and chips!

    The only thing that put me off was the constant images of the Union Jack - I am amazed the programme was not called The Great British Spice Rack. The BBC are getting as bad as the USA going down this route.

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    These types of programmes are on too much, what about giving other hobbies and past times a look in 
    I seem to recall a thread a year or two back, full of excellent suggestions for programmes about pastimes other than the apparently obligatory three or four.

    I don't think any of those suggestions were taken up by the PTB..

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by tubby backgammon (U14589324) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    I enjoyed this, though whether I would like my fish and chips spiced up, is another matter. I'm guessing the Beeb paid for the biker's fish suppers, so if they did the same for me, than of course, I would happily tuck in.

    Can't wait for next week, when Monty Panesar shows us his special vinegar recipe.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Gill P (U14122746) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    The Great British Sewing Bee was on earlier this year. That is another pastime which a lot of people enjoy.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Apart from the 'yes chef' bits - I enjoyed this.

    But this reminded me more of the Two Fat Ladies.smiley - winkeye


    Loved the Bread & Butter Pudding.smiley - cool

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by GrouchoM (U14261501) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Should the licence fee be renamed "The Great British Rip-Off"? Dom Littlewood could do a whole series about how the licence fee gets used/wasted.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by murphbridge (U2032303) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    Can't wait for next week, when Monty Panesar shows us his special vinegar recipe. 

    Very topical, and very funny, I nearly choked on my drink!! smiley - laugh. smiley - winkeye

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Piltdown Man (U1022939) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    A couple of guys adding spice to traditional dishes like fish and chips...wow, more licence payers money well spent!
    Scraping the barrel here by the sounds of it. 
    "Scraping the Barrel"...sounds like a new cookery programme title for those planning new programmes.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Chezzie (U1159267) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    A couple of guys adding spice to traditional dishes like fish and chips...wow, more licence payers money well spent!
    Scraping the barrel here by the sounds of it. 
    "Scraping the Barrel"...sounds like a new cookery programme title for those planning new programmes. 
    Some people seem to think that because they pay a TV licence every programme has to be to their taste, it is on BBC2 on a Monday not prime time BBC1 on a Saturday night so what is the problem? there is enough choice of other channels to find something that they do like.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) on Tuesday, 20th August 2013

    I enjoyed this, the pulled pork looked devine and the tips about the knotted ginger etc were useful.I also liked the banter between the two chefs, a nice watchable programme.smiley - ok

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Piggin (U4839534) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    I couldn't agree more Holly. I really enjoyed this and it reminded me of the Hairy Bikers and Two Fat Ladies.

    Their version of b&b pudding looked scrummy.

    I also agree with Codythedog, there is not that much gardening on TV and what there is is frequently taken off for sports, proms, and whatever. Now the BBC has 4 channels and the red button you would have thought that there was room for everything.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by eviled2 (U14446578) on Wednesday, 21st August 2013

    A couple of guys adding spice to traditional dishes like fish and chips...wow, more licence payers money well spent!
    Scraping the barrel here by the sounds of it. 
    "Scraping the Barrel"...sounds like a new cookery programme title for those planning new programmes. 
    Some people seem to think that because they pay a TV licence every programme has to be to their taste, it is on BBC2 on a Monday not prime time BBC1 on a Saturday night so what is the problem? there is enough choice of other channels to find something that they do like. 
    Absolutely not in my case. I fully accept that maybe the majority of BBC programmes are not to my taste and I can live with that.
    However, this snowball effect of cookery programmes is getting beyond a joke. New series, repeat series, planned series...the tv schedules are oversaturated with them, imho of course.
    Incidentally, my taste is for a bit of astronomy. I'm lucky to get 30 minutes of that a month.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Bonny (U14396592) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    I haven't watched this yet, but saw them on 'Breakfast' and liked the idea. Trouble is....it makes you feel so hungry...... and where do the many programmes on food help stem the increasing obesity problem?

    Just a thought....... smiley - smiley

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Thursday, 22nd August 2013

    Absolutely not in my case. I fully accept that maybe the majority of BBC programmes are not to my taste and I can live with that.
    However, this snowball effect of cookery programmes is getting beyond a joke. New series, repeat series, planned series...the tv schedules are oversaturated with them, imho of course.
    Incidentally, my taste is for a bit of astronomy. I'm lucky to get 30 minutes of that a month. 


    I am a foodie and I like programmes that are about actual food and/or cooking such as Raymond Blanc, Rick Stein's India, some of Jimmy Doherty’s programmes The Incredible Spice Men; even Saturday Kitchen. I don’t mind a bit of travelogue thrown in.

    However we could really reduce the load by getting rid of virtually all the completions; I'll except Great British Bake Off but come the glorious revolution, I’d like to see Celebrity Masterchef first up against the wall. Naff all to do with food or cooking as anyone knows it. more about whipping up competitive frenzy and giving airtime to people I’ve never heard of but who are apparently “Celebrated” (as that used to be what Celebrity meant)

    And we could do without the semi-hysterical tabloid-press-on-TV programmes like that awful thing with Gloria Hunniford last night.

    Cut out the dross and there wouldn’t be that many

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Mr_Lightning (U15450350) on Monday, 26th August 2013

    Just watched tonight's thrilling episode in which the Incredible Spice Men tell us all about spices that, unbeknownst to them, we've been using in this country for centuries.

    Plus, they have a weird sense of taste - they seem to be under the impression that caraway seed tastes like aniseed. Well, not to my palate, certainly. And since fennel is a very important spice in Indian cookery, I can't believe that they're unfamiliar with the aniseed flavour. So what's going on?

    Honestly, if someone can't tell the difference between the flavour of caraway seed and aniseed, I'd seriously wonder about their judgement.

    I thought this programme was going to be informative, but it's predicated on the assumption that nobody in Britain, apart from those who have come to live here in the last fifty-odd years, has any idea about spices. That's rubbish, which means that the resulting programme is basically rubbish too - so far, at least.

    I use spices all the time, and not just to cook Eastern food. I'm always experimenting with trying particular ones out in unusual contexts, and I'm sure lots of other people do too. So while I applaud the BBC for showing how spices work in more ways than you might expect, I don't like the impression they convey with this programme that we ancestral Brits are astounded at the use of spice - why would supermarkets give over a fairly large chunk of shelf space to spices and herbs otherwise?

    I suspect that the concept (Indian Hairy Bikers) was just too cute to resist, but really, it's a little stupid.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 27.

    Posted by Buttey (U14563284) on Monday, 26th August 2013

    Just watched tonight's thrilling episode in which the Incredible Spice Men tell us all about spices that, unbeknownst to them, we've been using in this country for centuries.

    Plus, they have a weird sense of taste - they seem to be under the impression that caraway seed tastes like aniseed. Well, not to my palate, certainly. And since fennel is a very important spice in Indian cookery, I can't believe that they're unfamiliar with the aniseed flavour. So what's going on?

    Honestly, if someone can't tell the difference between the flavour of caraway seed and aniseed, I'd seriously wonder about their judgement.

    I thought this programme was going to be informative, but it's predicated on the assumption that nobody in Britain, apart from those who have come to live here in the last fifty-odd years, has any idea about spices. That's rubbish, which means that the resulting programme is basically rubbish too - so far, at least.

    I use spices all the time, and not just to cook Eastern food. I'm always experimenting with trying particular ones out in unusual contexts, and I'm sure lots of other people do too. So while I applaud the BBC for showing how spices work in more ways than you might expect, I don't like the impression they convey with this programme that we ancestral Brits are astounded at the use of spice - why would supermarkets give over a fairly large chunk of shelf space to spices and herbs otherwise?

    I suspect that the concept (Indian Hairy Bikers) was just too cute to resist, but really, it's a little stupid. 
    The basis of the show is clearly and often stated, which is to see how spices can be used to enhance british traditional cooking. There is no suggestion in the show that spices are unknown to british cooks, merely that a different take on British food can be made using spices. Not too hard to get your head around surely?

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Mr_Lightning (U15450350) on Monday, 26th August 2013

    merely that a different take on British food can be made using spices. Not too hard to get your head around surely? 

    What I'm having trouble getting my head around is the so-called "different take" when it doesn't seem to be very different at all. We already use a lot of the very spices they purport to "introduce", and often in the very same dishes. Liquorice-flavoured toffee, for example, has been around for years. Nutmeg in sweet dishes is as old as the hills. Not too hard to understand, surely?

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Buttey (U14563284) on Monday, 26th August 2013

    merely that a different take on British food can be made using spices. Not too hard to get your head around surely? 

    What I'm having trouble getting my head around is the so-called "different take" when it doesn't seem to be very different at all. We already use a lot of the very spices they purport to "introduce", and often in the very same dishes. Liquorice-flavoured toffee, for example, has been around for years. Nutmeg in sweet dishes is as old as the hills. Not too hard to understand, surely? 
    Not too difficult, yet still you have problems.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by Mr_Lightning (U15450350) on Monday, 26th August 2013

    merely that a different take on British food can be made using spices. Not too hard to get your head around surely? 

    What I'm having trouble getting my head around is the so-called "different take" when it doesn't seem to be very different at all. We already use a lot of the very spices they purport to "introduce", and often in the very same dishes. Liquorice-flavoured toffee, for example, has been around for years. Nutmeg in sweet dishes is as old as the hills. Not too hard to understand, surely? 
    Not too difficult, yet still you have problems. 


    Er...what would they be?

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by lesleylove (U4947890) on Tuesday, 27th August 2013

    Missed last week - loved last night. Sat through it with a big smile on my face. Love Tony Singh's deep gravelly Edinburgh accent!

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) on Tuesday, 27th August 2013

    I enjoyed it again, I use nutmeg and blade mace and knew that the blade surrounded the nutmeg but it was fascinating to see it in it's natural state.I also use cloves in one dish I make but never knew the trick about how the clove swells when heated, I'll probably use half the amount I once did because of this tip.You never stop learning about food no matter how experienced a cook you think you are, well done the Spicemen.smiley - ok

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by babs47 (U3436667) on Tuesday, 27th August 2013

    What a pair of funny men........ thought we would watch the beginning but saw the whole programme through. Learnt some interesting stuff about spices too. Looking forward to seeing more and listening to the lovely Scottish accent. Admired his kilt this week smiley - winkeye

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Tuesday, 27th August 2013

    Treacle Pudding - smiley - biggrin

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by Sploink (U9993613) on Tuesday, 27th August 2013

    Treacle Pudding - smiley - biggrin  smiley - drool

    Really enjoyed the programme again. It's just nice relaxing TV, with the chance of picking up a few useful hints along the way. I wonder if the clove thing would work in a microwave? smiley - erm

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) on Wednesday, 28th August 2013

    Treacle Pudding - smiley - biggrin  smiley - drool

    Really enjoyed the programme again. It's just nice relaxing TV, with the chance of picking up a few useful hints along the way. I wonder if the clove thing would work in a microwave? smiley - erm 


    I'm going to try it Sploink, wish me luck.smiley - yikes

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) on Wednesday, 28th August 2013

    It didn't alas but I assume it needs oil or moisture to help in the process.smiley - erm

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 29th August 2013

    Treacle Pudding - smiley - biggrin  smiley - drool

    Really enjoyed the programme again. It's just nice relaxing TV, with the chance of picking up a few useful hints along the way. I wonder if the clove thing would work in a microwave? smiley - erm 


    I'm going to try it Sploink, wish me luck.smiley - yikes 
    So what is the trick with cloves? I didn't catch the programme, I wish I did now!

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Sploink (U9993613) on Thursday, 29th August 2013

    Treacle Pudding - smiley - biggrin  smiley - drool

    Really enjoyed the programme again. It's just nice relaxing TV, with the chance of picking up a few useful hints along the way. I wonder if the clove thing would work in a microwave? smiley - erm 


    I'm going to try it Sploink, wish me luck.smiley - yikes 
    So what is the trick with cloves? I didn't catch the programme, I wish I did now! 
    They told you that if you just heat up the cloves in a frying pan with a smear of oil in (not for long, just a minute or 2) the heat makes the clove swell to double the size, and it brings out the flavour of the oils in the clove. So you get a richer flavour from the clove and don't have to use so much. I always fry my spices for just a minute or so when I make a curry, but I'd never thought of doing it with whole cloves.

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Chezzie (U1159267) on Monday, 2nd September 2013

    The first time I made apple crumble it was clove crumble with a hint of apple, I think overdid it a bit!

    I am loving the programme it makes me happy. There are a lot of people who are just starting to cook or have never cooked with spices who will learn a lot from Cy and Tony.

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by mismatched (U14242423) on Tuesday, 3rd September 2013

    Haggis Pakoras smiley - erm !

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by somewhatsilly (U14315357) on Tuesday, 3rd September 2013

    Haggis pakora, delicious as is haggis tempura, and I had haggis 'bon-bons' in a very posh restaurant this weekend. The humble haggis appears in many guises.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Tuesday, 3rd September 2013

    I use crumbled haggis to stuff rolled breast of lamb which I then post roast

    Liked the look of the cardamom Cranachan

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 3rd September 2013

    That sounds lovely Stokey Sue! smiley - ok

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by the_cleaner (U3423083) on Tuesday, 3rd September 2013

    That Mince Lamb Pie.....smiley - ok

    And the Honey Roast Chicken - with the Roast Potatoes....to die for.smiley - biggrin


    smiley - cool

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by mismatched (U14242423) on Tuesday, 3rd September 2013

    Yes, I see that version of honey roast chicken being done in this house

    Report message47

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