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The Burrowers:Animals Underground

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) ** on Friday, 16th August 2013

    This could be very interesting especially to children, so why is it on at 9.00pm tonight? Doesn't the BBC want to see children watching it?

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  • Message 2

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    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    I tend to agree with you, but it may contain stuff that would upset children.

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  • Message 3

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    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    I tend to agree with you, but it may contain stuff that would upset children. 

    What? Out of place presenter? Annoying stilted narration? Overbearing background music? Odd camera angles and poor use of focus?

    Or just the usual sex and violence associated with wildlife?

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  • Message 4

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    Posted by Bananas are the best (U15650112) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    Some program information:

    www.bbc.co.uk/mediac...

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  • Message 5

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    Posted by Ceiderduck (U14588518) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    There's that 'iconic' word again smiley - doh

    Don't really fancy this too much after reading the bit about building their own setts and burrows. That really sounds a bit silly to me.

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  • Message 6

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    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) ** on Friday, 16th August 2013

    Some program information:

    www.bbc.co.uk/mediac... 


    Thanks fish, it doesn't sound like there would be anything to upset children in your link.smiley - erm

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  • Message 7

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    Posted by Peta (U24) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    Episode 1
    Image for Episode 1
    Not currently available on BBC iPlayer
    DURATION: 1 HOUR
    Chris Packham sheds light on the magical underground world of three iconic British animals, badgers, water voles and rabbits. In one of the biggest natural history experiments ever undertaken, he investigates wild burrows to recreate full-scale replicas for the animals to live in and be observed, including the largest man-made rabbit warren of its kind ever built. This creates a window on their lives never witnessed before, from birth in winter to their emergence from the burrow in summer.

    How do they create their burrows? How do they breed and give birth? Observe fascinating new science and new behaviour as the team design and build a rabbit warren, a badger sett and a water vole burrow with its own riverbank.

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  • Message 8

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    Posted by Vox_Populi (U3226170) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    This next programme is about the mole, something that I'm interested in out of curiosity because I might be able to catch them easier if I know what they get up to.
    I've already caught three over the last few weeks and one today in the trap, three males and a female, shame really because they are cute little creatures apart from the mess they make.

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  • Message 9

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    Posted by Peta (U24) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    There are lots of programmes on in the evening that may be suitable for children.
    I guess parents can tape it for their children, if they think their little ones may be interested.

    I'm not sure that TV scheduling can - or should -completely revolve around children though, because they have their own channels nowadays, and the majority of people *don't* have children.

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  • Message 10

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    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) on Friday, 16th August 2013



    I'm not sure the scheduling can revolve around children though, because they have their own channels nowadays, and the majority of people don't have children. 

    I think you'll find the majority do have children, but the lil' bstards have a habit of growing into adults that, in turn, have lil' bstards of their own.


    smiley - smiley

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  • Message 11

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    Posted by Peta (U24) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    LOL, on that basis I have some too - but they can record their own darn TV programmes nowadays! smiley - biggrin

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  • Message 12

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    Posted by Oldends (U13875463) ** on Friday, 16th August 2013

    'I guess parents can tape it...'

    What a quaint old-fashioned world some people must live in!

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  • Message 13

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    Posted by madauntydawn (U6675998) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    smiley - laugh



    I really cannot believe I'm watching an item on cheese on toast.smiley - laugh

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  • Message 14

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    Posted by madauntydawn (U6675998) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    Apologies, my last comment referred to the One Show.smiley - erm

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  • Message 15

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    Posted by jannemieke (U9267858) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    I am going to watch this. Chris Packham is a good presenter. smiley - ok

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  • Message 16

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    Posted by Ceiderduck (U14588518) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    smiley - laugh



    I really cannot believe I'm watching an item on cheese on toast.smiley - laugh 
    Welsh rabbit was it? Sorry sorry sorry smiley - run

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  • Message 17

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    Posted by ashleyhr (U14203741) ** on Friday, 16th August 2013

    So young badgers and rabbits instinctively behave in ways like the adults sometimes, eg making a nest of bedding, even when there are no adults to copy.

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  • Message 18

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    Posted by BrightYangThing (U14627705) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    They quite possibly think similar about us...

    I loved this programme.

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  • Message 19

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    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    Just magical!
    A suberb and ground breaking project, I could watch them all night.

    If you haven't already done so, follow the lead of Chris Packham and Chris Cheeseman, and sign the largest epetition ever.

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  • Message 20

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    Posted by deansay (U5811575) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    It was great. smiley - biggrin Chris Packham is a smiley - star

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  • Message 21

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    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    I love this - absolutely fascinating!

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  • Message 22

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    Posted by verityjessop (U15744912) on Friday, 16th August 2013

    and then the badger cull starts in somerset !

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  • Message 23

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    Posted by JanetDoe (U10211737) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Why catch them? In an article I read recently a mole catcher said he has moles on his land and that they do no harm, but if people want to keep him in work just to keep their gardens tidy why should he complain.

    I believe they're solitary - I'm interested in next week's to find out if this is fact and that if you remove one, another will take it's place.

    I've had a mole for months, which has moved from the front garden to the back and had extended into both next door's gardens. One neighbour is fine about it, the other maintains she isn't eating or sleeping and is losing weight because of the untidiness of her garden with a couple of molehills in it. But then she has OCD about just about everything and believes there's a mole under every molehill, not just them being the excavations from one mole's feeding tunnels.

    What's wrong with a bit of untidiness in the garden anyway? Instead of just raking the spoil, my neighbour sweeps it up and puts it in the dustbin. Her garden is a barren wilderness with shaved "grass" and a couple of shrubs against bare 6 feet high fences; mine has a small formal patio with plant pots with the other three quarters a wildlife haven, which isn't mown and has a wildflowers, wildlife pond, bird table, rubbish heap, compost heap, log pile, bug hotel, etc.

    Haven't seen a fresh mole hill for about a week, so I suspect mole has move on to pastures new.

    This is a brilliant programme - one of the best and most informative wildlife programmes that's been produced. Can't wait to see if the water voles have produced.

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  • Message 24

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    Posted by Vox_Populi (U3226170) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Why catch them? In an article I read recently a mole catcher said he has moles on his land and that they do no harm, but if people want to keep him in work just to keep their gardens tidy why should he complain.

    I believe they're solitary - I'm interested in next week's to find out if this is fact and that if you remove one, another will take it's place.

    I've had a mole for months, which has moved from the front garden to the back and had extended into both next door's gardens. One neighbour is fine about it, the other maintains she isn't eating or sleeping and is losing weight because of the untidiness of her garden with a couple of molehills in it. But then she has OCD about just about everything and believes there's a mole under every molehill, not just them being the excavations from one mole's feeding tunnels.

    What's wrong with a bit of untidiness in the garden anyway? Instead of just raking the spoil, my neighbour sweeps it up and puts it in the dustbin. Her garden is a barren wilderness with shaved "grass" and a couple of shrubs against bare 6 feet high fences; mine has a small formal patio with plant pots with the other three quarters a wildlife haven, which isn't mown and has a wildflowers, wildlife pond, bird table, rubbish heap, compost heap, log pile, bug hotel, etc.

    Haven't seen a fresh mole hill for about a week, so I suspect mole has move on to pastures new.

    This is a brilliant programme - one of the best and most informative wildlife programmes that's been produced. Can't wait to see if the water voles have produced. 
    Trouble is have you ever tried cutting the grass with mole hills all over the place?, it ruins the cutting blades. not to mention the chore of scraping up the mounds of earth and I've got a large piece of grass and that means a large amount of earth to shift, because I don't just get one mole working away I get two or three at a time.
    Fortunately I've got the knack of how to set the traps, so if the little buggers return they won't last long.
    Farmers hate them, one farmhand I knew used to poison them with worms laced with strychnine, but you need a licence to handle that stuff.
    I've actually watched them working away by pushing up their hills as they are digging, so I've jabbed a garden fork into the ground to spike them, but you never can tell where exactly they are so that method is a bit hit or miss, in my case a lot of misses.

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  • Message 25

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    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Trouble is have you ever tried cutting the grass with mole hills all over the place?, it ruins the cutting blades. not to mention the chore of scraping up the mounds of earth and I've got a large piece of grass and that means a large amount of earth to shift, because I don't just get one mole working away I get two or three at a time.
    Fortunately I've got the knack of how to set the traps, so if the little buggers return they won't last long.
    Farmers hate them, one farmhand I knew used to poison them with worms laced with strychnine, but you need a licence to handle that stuff.
    I've actually watched them working away by pushing up their hills as they are digging, so I've jabbed a garden fork into the ground to spike them, but you never can tell where exactly they are so that method is a bit hit or miss, in my case a lot of misses. 

    What a sad world we live in, where people seem to take such delight in killing innocent animals to save themselves a bit of trouble.
    Can't trust myself to say any more.

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  • Message 26

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    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Trouble is have you ever tried cutting the grass with mole hills all over the place?, it ruins the cutting blades. not to mention the chore of scraping up the mounds of earth and I've got a large piece of grass and that means a large amount of earth to shift, because I don't just get one mole working away I get two or three at a time.
    Fortunately I've got the knack of how to set the traps, so if the little buggers return they won't last long.
    Farmers hate them, one farmhand I knew used to poison them with worms laced with strychnine, but you need a licence to handle that stuff.
    I've actually watched them working away by pushing up their hills as they are digging, so I've jabbed a garden fork into the ground to spike them, but you never can tell where exactly they are so that method is a bit hit or miss, in my case a lot of misses. 

    What a sad world we live in, where people seem to take such delight in killing innocent animals to save themselves a bit of trouble.
    Can't trust myself to say any more. 
    I'm with you Rabbit. What arrogance to think one has the right to kill any other creature by any deeply unpleasant means possible simply because it is deemed an inconvenience and then brag about one's actions - nasty.
    Loved the programme and will be glued to my set for the next two.

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  • Message 27

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    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) ** on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Trouble is have you ever tried cutting the grass with mole hills all over the place?, it ruins the cutting blades. not to mention the chore of scraping up the mounds of earth and I've got a large piece of grass and that means a large amount of earth to shift, because I don't just get one mole working away I get two or three at a time.
    Fortunately I've got the knack of how to set the traps, so if the little buggers return they won't last long.
    Farmers hate them, one farmhand I knew used to poison them with worms laced with strychnine, but you need a licence to handle that stuff.
    I've actually watched them working away by pushing up their hills as they are digging, so I've jabbed a garden fork into the ground to spike them, but you never can tell where exactly they are so that method is a bit hit or miss, in my case a lot of misses. 

    What a sad world we live in, where people seem to take such delight in killing innocent animals to save themselves a bit of trouble.
    Can't trust myself to say any more. 


    Indeed a very sad post.........

    I loved the programme it was enchanting as well as informative and Chris Packham is brilliant! smiley - loveblush I still stand by my OP and say it could have been on earlier for the kiddiewinks, not all parents would think to tape it for their children but hopefully it will be repeated at a more appropriate time.On the whole though an excellent programme, well done BBC! smiley - applause

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  • Message 28

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    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    A suberb and ground breaking project 
    I just realized what I said there. smiley - biggrin

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  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by shilkman (U13628054) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    I love this - absolutely fascinating!  Indeed it was. The BBC does these sort of programs so well. Can't wait until the next one.

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  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by ashleyhr (U14203741) ** on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Message 24

    One option is to move to Northern Ireland or the Outer Hebrides.

    I saw a mole above ground in the middle of the day while visiting north Wales on 3 January 2000. It was not far from the stream and the water mill about one mile south of Llansanffraid Glan Conwy. I thought of it as the Millennium Mole.

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  • Message 31

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    Posted by Lighten Up (U15801316) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    I regret to say I found it just a little bit boring and fell asleep. Chris Packham seemed to spend the first half hour telling us how great this programme was going to be, what a fantastic network of tunnels they had constructed, how we were going to learn so many incredible things that were new to science...zzzzz. It was as exciting as being shown around a property by an estate agent. Here is the bedroom, here is the kitchen, here is the toilet...zzzzzzz.

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  • Message 32

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    Posted by Vox_Populi (U3226170) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Trouble is have you ever tried cutting the grass with mole hills all over the place?, it ruins the cutting blades. not to mention the chore of scraping up the mounds of earth and I've got a large piece of grass and that means a large amount of earth to shift, because I don't just get one mole working away I get two or three at a time.
    Fortunately I've got the knack of how to set the traps, so if the little buggers return they won't last long.
    Farmers hate them, one farmhand I knew used to poison them with worms laced with strychnine, but you need a licence to handle that stuff.
    I've actually watched them working away by pushing up their hills as they are digging, so I've jabbed a garden fork into the ground to spike them, but you never can tell where exactly they are so that method is a bit hit or miss, in my case a lot of misses. 

    What a sad world we live in, where people seem to take such delight in killing innocent animals to save themselves a bit of trouble.
    Can't trust myself to say any more. 
    You're obviously a town dwelling vegan then.

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  • Message 33

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    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Trouble is have you ever tried cutting the grass with mole hills all over the place?, it ruins the cutting blades. not to mention the chore of scraping up the mounds of earth and I've got a large piece of grass and that means a large amount of earth to shift, because I don't just get one mole working away I get two or three at a time.
    Fortunately I've got the knack of how to set the traps, so if the little buggers return they won't last long.
    Farmers hate them, one farmhand I knew used to poison them with worms laced with strychnine, but you need a licence to handle that stuff.
    I've actually watched them working away by pushing up their hills as they are digging, so I've jabbed a garden fork into the ground to spike them, but you never can tell where exactly they are so that method is a bit hit or miss, in my case a lot of misses. 

    What a sad world we live in, where people seem to take such delight in killing innocent animals to save themselves a bit of trouble.
    Can't trust myself to say any more. 
    You're obviously a town dwelling vegan then. 
    And you obviously have no idea what you're talking about.

    I live way out in the sticks, surrounded by pasture and woodland.
    Quite what ones dietary habits have to do with whether or not one enjoys killing moles, god alone knows.

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  • Message 35

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    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) ** on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    I regret to say I found it just a little bit boring and fell asleep. Chris Packham seemed to spend the first half hour telling us how great this programme was going to be, what a fantastic network of tunnels they had constructed, how we were going to learn so many incredible things that were new to science...zzzzz. It was as exciting as being shown around a property by an estate agent. Here is the bedroom, here is the kitchen, here is the toilet...zzzzzzz. 

    Oh well you can't please everyone, he had to explain what was happening first and why.Maybe you should have kept awake, personally I found it fascinating that the rabbit kits were only fed once a day etc and look forward to seeing how the moles 'get on'.smiley - winkeye

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  • Message 36

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    Posted by Vox_Populi (U3226170) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Trouble is have you ever tried cutting the grass with mole hills all over the place?, it ruins the cutting blades. not to mention the chore of scraping up the mounds of earth and I've got a large piece of grass and that means a large amount of earth to shift, because I don't just get one mole working away I get two or three at a time.
    Fortunately I've got the knack of how to set the traps, so if the little buggers return they won't last long.
    Farmers hate them, one farmhand I knew used to poison them with worms laced with strychnine, but you need a licence to handle that stuff.
    I've actually watched them working away by pushing up their hills as they are digging, so I've jabbed a garden fork into the ground to spike them, but you never can tell where exactly they are so that method is a bit hit or miss, in my case a lot of misses. 

    What a sad world we live in, where people seem to take such delight in killing innocent animals to save themselves a bit of trouble.
    Can't trust myself to say any more. 
    You're obviously a town dwelling vegan then. 
    And you obviously have no idea what you're talking about.

    I live way out in the sticks, surrounded by pasture and woodland.
    Quite what ones dietary habits have to do with whether or not one enjoys killing moles, god alone knows. 
    Because you probably eat meat, and where do you think that comes from?.
    Is this post OK? smiley - biggrin

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  • Message 37

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    Posted by MsA (U14389417) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    There's that 'iconic' word again smiley - doh

    Don't really fancy this too much after reading the bit about building their own setts and burrows. That really sounds a bit silly to me. 
    I think it's the only adjective the BBC know...

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  • Message 38

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    Posted by Vox_Populi (U3226170) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    I find it amazing, kill furry cute little creatures for being pests like moles or rats and some people suddenly get overcome with "bambi syndrome". Kill a pig or a bull for meat and that's OK, smacks of double standards to me.

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  • Message 39

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    Posted by Geometry_Man (U12739007) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    I find it amazing, kill furry cute little creatures for being pests like moles or rats and some people suddenly get overcome with "bambi syndrome". Kill a pig or a bull for meat and that's OK, smacks of double standards to me.  Surely you can see the difference between slaughtering something which you have deliberately raised as food, and murdering a wild animal because it happens to annoy you?

    I think we should be striving to preserve our wild life as much as possible - it's in enough trouble as it is from human activity - and if something is viewed as a pest, our first instinct nowadays should not be to exterminate it.

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  • Message 40

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    Posted by hdehoon (U2175617) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    I loved it. Packham and his bunnies are top.

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  • Message 41

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    Posted by JanetDoe (U10211737) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    I used to live in the middle of farmland in Somerset and had to kill a mole because of the danger of horses and other livestock breaking a leg by putting a hoof in the hole under a molehill. Had to be shown how to set the trap and didn't like doing it one bit. I wouldn't do it now just because it's inconvenient to have moles.

    And yes, I have tried cutting grass, but had the sense to rake the soil from the mole hills level before mowing.

    It's not a case of not wanting to kill furry animals, it's a case of not interferring with the food chain. Nature sorts itself out if not interferred with by humans. Totally different to raising animals and slaughtering them (hopefully humanely) for food.

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  • Message 42

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    Posted by Vox_Populi (U3226170) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    I find it amazing, kill furry cute little creatures for being pests like moles or rats and some people suddenly get overcome with "bambi syndrome". Kill a pig or a bull for meat and that's OK, smacks of double standards to me.  Surely you can see the difference between slaughtering something which you have deliberately raised as food, and murdering a wild animal because it happens to annoy you?

    I think we should be striving to preserve our wild life as much as possible - it's in enough trouble as it is from human activity - and if something is viewed as a pest, our first instinct nowadays should not be to exterminate it. 
    Slaughtering?, murdering? it's much the same thing really, i.e. killing or taking of life, for what ever reason.
    I've nothing against any creature unless it annoys me, I don't actively persecute any animal for pleasure regardless of what impression people have of me on here, I don't kill creatures indiscriminately for pleasure, I take absolutely no pleasure in killing things.
    However, if I'm over run with rats, which I have been sometimes, I use every means I can to get rid of them, i.e. poisoning, shooting, trapping and hunting with dogs.
    Same as moles, lovely little creatures that they are, but they must go, and trapping is the only answer, asking them nicely to bugger off won't do it.
    I used to raise pigs and sheep, some of which I took to the abattoir for meat for the freezer, I wasn't happy to do that, but there's not much point in raising these animals if you are not going to eat some of them, I felt guilty but life is life and death is death, something living on a smallholding you have to deal with emotionally.

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  • Message 43

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    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) ** on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Thankfully Vox_Populi, old fashioned ideas like yours are becoming fewer and far between.I live in the country and even hardened farmers don't have the defunct ideas on 'pests' that you seem to have.Their fathers would trap and kill the likes of Magpies, Crows and Jackdaws, even sparrows if they dare steal a bit of their chicken food. Thankfully as I said attitudes are changing and not before time.

    The only issue I don't disagree with you is on rats, much as I find the clever little critters cute, they get far to close to human life for comfort if not checked.

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  • Message 46

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    Posted by Vox_Populi (U3226170) on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Thankfully Vox_Populi, old fashioned ideas like yours are becoming fewer and far between.I live in the country and even hardened farmers don't have the defunct ideas on 'pests' that you seem to have.Their fathers would trap and kill the likes of Magpies, Crows and Jackdaws, even sparrows if they dare steal a bit of their chicken food. Thankfully as I said attitudes are changing and not before time.

    The only issue I don't disagree with you is on rats, much as I find the clever little critters cute, they get far to close to human life for comfort if not checked. 
    I don't know where you live, but to the farmers in my area the main pests are moles, rats, rabbits, badgers and foxes. not necessarily in that order.
    I think you'll find that your "hardened farmers" aren't telling you the whole story,
    I'll bet, as you are not a farmer, they are glossing over what their real thoughts are, in other words telling you what you want to hear.

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  • Message 47

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    Posted by hollybeau (U13700692) ** on Saturday, 17th August 2013

    Thankfully Vox_Populi, old fashioned ideas like yours are becoming fewer and far between.I live in the country and even hardened farmers don't have the defunct ideas on 'pests' that you seem to have.Their fathers would trap and kill the likes of Magpies, Crows and Jackdaws, even sparrows if they dare steal a bit of their chicken food. Thankfully as I said attitudes are changing and not before time.

    The only issue I don't disagree with you is on rats, much as I find the clever little critters cute, they get far to close to human life for comfort if not checked. 
    I don't know where you live, but to the farmers in my area the main pests are moles, rats, rabbits, badgers and foxes. not necessarily in that order.
    I think you'll find that your "hardened farmers" aren't telling you the whole story,
    I'll bet, as you are not a farmer, they are glossing over what their real thoughts are, in other words telling you what you want to hear. 


    No actually my nearest neighbour is a farmer's son and doesn't have his attitude, I know when his father visits though and the traps come out.smiley - erm It's in his blood and he does what his father has done for years and so it's gone on but the tide is changing.After seeing a larson trap I rang a chicken farmer to see what they did about it and he was quite straight forward, he said actually these birds did him a favour they took away the waste which rats would eat.Oh and to make it quite clear about your friendly old fashioned farmer types, I've seen a locking snare used and deliberately set with a hole in his chicken fence to catch a fox.Ruddy disgusting!!

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  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by JanetDoe (U10211737) on Sunday, 18th August 2013

    Thankfully Vox_Populi, old fashioned ideas like yours are becoming fewer and far between.I live in the country and even hardened farmers don't have the defunct ideas on 'pests' that you seem to have.Their fathers would trap and kill the likes of Magpies, Crows and Jackdaws, even sparrows if they dare steal a bit of their chicken food. Thankfully as I said attitudes are changing and not before time.

    The only issue I don't disagree with you is on rats, much as I find the clever little critters cute, they get far to close to human life for comfort if not checked. 
    I don't know where you live, but to the farmers in my area the main pests are moles, rats, rabbits, badgers and foxes. not necessarily in that order.
    I think you'll find that your "hardened farmers" aren't telling you the whole story,
    I'll bet, as you are not a farmer, they are glossing over what their real thoughts are, in other words telling you what you want to hear. 
    And I think you'll find that at the moment badgers are protected, with a hefty fine for killing or even disturbing them so only criminals regard them as pests .

    Don't know where you live with the attitude to you and your neighbours have to wildlife and the environment, but I lived for a long time among farmers, and (it wouldn't happen now because it's illegal) when the hunt came round they all got out their tractors to ensure there were no foxes above ground for the hunt to chase. Lanes, the edges of fields, hedges and banks were valued and sympathetic planting meant there was no need for pesticides. The only animal that was removed was the mole because of the danger to livestock putting feet down the holes. The moles were relocated rather than killed - a mole claw trap is a barbaric object and I only used one once. When I saw the result I disposed of it and bought a humane trap, which is a tube that captures the mole alive for relocating.

    Do you kill pollinating insects with pesticides as well? I suspect you do.

    Nature balances itself, but the problem is that some humans think that they have the right to dictate what can and can't live, provided they're the ones who live and don't have their activities interferred with.

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  • Message 49

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    Posted by saffiewalks (U11222674) on Sunday, 18th August 2013

    Great post Janet and, as a lifelong countrywoman, one that I am entirely in agreement with.
    Vox Populi seems to see themself as more Vox Dei!

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  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Vox_Populi (U3226170) on Sunday, 18th August 2013

    Thankfully Vox_Populi, old fashioned ideas like yours are becoming fewer and far between.I live in the country and even hardened farmers don't have the defunct ideas on 'pests' that you seem to have.Their fathers would trap and kill the likes of Magpies, Crows and Jackdaws, even sparrows if they dare steal a bit of their chicken food. Thankfully as I said attitudes are changing and not before time.

    The only issue I don't disagree with you is on rats, much as I find the clever little critters cute, they get far to close to human life for comfort if not checked. 
    I don't know where you live, but to the farmers in my area the main pests are moles, rats, rabbits, badgers and foxes. not necessarily in that order.
    I think you'll find that your "hardened farmers" aren't telling you the whole story,
    I'll bet, as you are not a farmer, they are glossing over what their real thoughts are, in other words telling you what you want to hear. 
    And I think you'll find that at the moment badgers are protected, with a hefty fine for killing or even disturbing them so only criminals regard them as pests .

    Don't know where you live with the attitude to you and your neighbours have to wildlife and the environment, but I lived for a long time among farmers, and (it wouldn't happen now because it's illegal) when the hunt came round they all got out their tractors to ensure there were no foxes above ground for the hunt to chase. Lanes, the edges of fields, hedges and banks were valued and sympathetic planting meant there was no need for pesticides. The only animal that was removed was the mole because of the danger to livestock putting feet down the holes. The moles were relocated rather than killed - a mole claw trap is a barbaric object and I only used one once. When I saw the result I disposed of it and bought a humane trap, which is a tube that captures the mole alive for relocating.

    Do you kill pollinating insects with pesticides as well? I suspect you do.

    Nature balances itself, but the problem is that some humans think that they have the right to dictate what can and can't live, provided they're the ones who live and don't have their activities interferred with. 
    Badgers, yes aren't they the animals that carry the TB virus which then gives TB to cows, which then infects the milk we drink?. Although it's illegal to kill badgers I've still seen dead ones that have been run over by the side of the road, by accident of course.
    As for moles, I wasn't aware there was a humane trap for moles, I might have a look to see what they cost though. As for disposal of live ones, I would have to be very careful where I dumped it, if I was caught putting it on farmland I wouldn't be very popular with the farmers in my area. As one farmer said to me when discussing moles "what good are they".

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