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Steven Berkoff's criticism of BBC TV

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by triuqs (U1858101) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Oh how I agree with actor Steven Berkoff's attack on BBC TV. His view is spot on and begs the question, "just what are the BBC doing with the licence fee?". The BBC should be in a unique and priviliged position of having an assured annual income of £6bn enabling them to make quality, watchable programmes. Instead they make the likes of Eastenders and Holby City year in, year out.
    I browsed the BBC1 schedule for last Thursday between 8pm to 10pm and I couldn't believe what they had on during prime time--an hour of cookery followed by an hour of DIY.

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  • Message 2

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    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Odd-not long ago-you did not have a licence

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    So you do you just peruse the schedules out of interest?

    And Eastenders and Holby are watched by millions-my not be to you taste-but.....

    Not just your BBC is it?

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  • Message 3

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    Posted by AmosBurke (U8229185) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    While I agree with Berkoff''s comments, I think he has rose tinted specs on. He said that he wept tears while watching Saturday night BBC, with "Strictly Come Dancing", and mentioned in his youth he watched plays. Has he forgotten "Come Dancing" which occupied Auntie's Saturday night from 1949 to 1998?

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  • Message 4

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    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

  • Message 5

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    Posted by fourthelephant (U15487252) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    That's it BBC... ignore the thrust of what's said, and just pick holes in the detail

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    If anyone wants to see what he said:

    www.telegraph.co.uk/...

    I think he does have rose tinted specs - and I don't think those heavy duty plays were often on Saturday nights (at least not before there were two channels to share the load)

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    That's it BBC... ignore the thrust of what's said, and just pick holes in the detail  Just for the record-as fourthelephant you seem to think so-I have no connection with the BBC

    The OP claims not to have had a licence-but has an issue of how something he does not contribute to is spent

    What does get tiresome is reading people knocking -now the two programmes mentioned are extremely popular

    Have you anything constructive to add to the debate -or are you just going to throw insults about?

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Here's some old TV listings, to help with comparisons between then and now:

    tvlistings.thetvroom...

    I think there's a fair bit to be said for the argument that there's less in the way of heavyweight arts coverage, but the populist stuff has been there all along.

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by fourthelephant (U15487252) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    That's it BBC... ignore the thrust of what's said, and just pick holes in the detail  Just for the record-as fourthelephant you seem to think so-I have no connection with the BBC
     
    Perhaps moderators should be flagged as such, rather than us ordinary viewers feeling we're being attacked by BBC attack dogs every time we say something slightly anti-BBC (which, by the way, is a totally legitimate point of view, not trolling). Would be nice if, sometimes, the BBC took negative comments as constructive rather than seeming to defend the indefensible.

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  • Message 10

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    Posted by dayraven (U13717520) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Perhaps moderators should be flagged as such 
    The BBC employees have their names in italics. The moderators, if I understand correctly, don't post.

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    That's it BBC... ignore the thrust of what's said, and just pick holes in the detail  Just for the record-as fourthelephant you seem to think so-I have no connection with the BBC
     
    Perhaps moderators should be flagged as such, rather than us ordinary viewers feeling we're being attacked by BBC attack dogs every time we say something slightly anti-BBC (which, by the way, is a totally legitimate point of view, not trolling). Would be nice if, sometimes, the BBC took negative comments as constructive rather than seeming to defend the indefensible. 


    Dayraven is correct.

    The moderators never post to the boards. The BBC staff, like me and Lee have our name in Italics so that you can easily identify us.

    smiley - ok


    Oh and of course we're fine having negative things said about BBC programmes.

    you can see that that's true by the comments posted to this board.

    Only posts that break the house rules are removed - offensive, abusive, libellous that kind of thing.

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  • Message 12

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    Posted by mismatched (U14242423) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    As someone who watches neither Eastenders or Holby City, for once I agree with Steven Berkoff. I would be grateful if the BBC or any TV company would produce some programmes for grown up people. Not just violent murders etc or so called quiz programmes with a shreaking audience

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by fourthelephant (U15487252) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Perhaps moderators should be flagged as such 
    The BBC employees have their names in italics. The moderators, if I understand correctly, don't post. 
    A bit subtle (wouldn't it be better to put '(BBC employee)' after their name?), but thanks for the info.

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    I see that he also had a go at theatre too

    But his criticism was not reserved for the corporation as he claimed that in the last 30 years the theatre has not produced a single actor of worth and there is more talent in street performing.  

    Many people might feel that that's a bit harsh too...

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  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Here's some old TV listings, to help with comparisons between then and now:

    tvlistings.thetvroom...

    I think there's a fair bit to be said for the argument that there's less in the way of heavyweight arts coverage, but the populist stuff has been there all along. 
    Berkoff is now 76, born 1937

    In fact he said
    And I watched almost with tears because I remembered when I was 17, 18 I used to see Hamlet and Death Of A Salesman on a Saturday night. That educated me." 


    So he is talking about TV in 1954/55

    A different time and place

    I don't remember TV then and I doubt many of us do

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  • Message 16

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    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    We can look them up though Stokey Sue.

    Back in a minute. smiley - smiley

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  • Message 17

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    Posted by paulca66 (U14951588) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    I do remember BBC1 showing Secret Army on Saturday night in the late 70s. ITV also showed Enemy At The Door around the same time. ITV also showed Robin Of Sherwood on Saturday night in the mid 80s. Drama, as well as light entertainment, has been shown on both BBC1 and ITV on Saturday night. I'm currently watching The Americans on ITV on Saturdays.

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  • Message 18

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    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    www.78rpm.co.uk/bbc....

    BBC TV Programmes for Wednesday November 26th 1958
    11.50am-12.50 St Paul's Cathedral - Dedication of the American Memorial Chapel
    2.05 For Schools - How Your Body Works- 9 Mainly About Hearing
    2.30 Association Football - England v Wales at Villa Park
    3.40approx Watch with Mother - The Flowerpot Men
    3.55-4.40approx Mainly for Women - Wednesday Magazine - John Witty with Gerard Hoffnung
    5.00 Children's Newsreel
    5.10 Playbox - opened by Eamonn Andrews with Tony Hart. The Eyes of Truth part 5 with Ivan Owen and Owen Berry
    6.00 News Headlines, Sports News and Weather; 6.10 Local News
    6.20 Good Companions - with Peter West. A series about pets
    6.45 Tonight; News Summary
    7.30 A-Z - with Alan Melville. 'D' with Diana Dors, Dickie Dawson, Florence Desmond, Zena Dare, Lonnie Donegan, Johnny Dankworth
    8.20 Sportsview- Amateur Boxing, London v The Army, Professional Boxing: Bygraves v Folley
    9.15 The English Speaking Union - from The Guildhall, Harold Macmillan welcomes Richard Nixon
    10 News; 10.15 Sportsview- highlights of the afternoon match
    10.30 Animal, Vegetable, Mineral? - Cpt Taprell Dorling, VA McBride, George Millar are challenged by National Maritime Museum. Chairman: Glyn Daniel
    11 News Summary; Weather and Close Down
    To BBC start

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  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Some of the most popular programmes from the 50s


    www.tv.com/shows/net...

    and

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    British TV series - above link - not all BBC included...

    The Good Old Days
    Opportunity Knocks
    Sunday Night at the London Palladium
    The Black and White Minstrel Show
    The $64,000 Question (UK game show)

    So even then, it wasn't all cerebral plays...

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  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by caissier (U14073060) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    SB is talking about a subtle difference between then and now. There was a better kind of populist stuff then.

    It seems obvious to me there's a serious cultural malaise upon us now. Once there was a desire to achieve intelligence and demanding quality. It was taken for granted that was a good thing. Now the market has overwhelmed that and it's all about demotics and ratings, sales and money - apart from hold-out niches like Horrible Histories. There are many articles now by well-known practitioners, usually getting on now, about how depressed they are by the current state of things. There was one by Mike Figgis a few weeks ago.

    www.theguardian.com/...

    I don't think it's taking rosy specs to the past and apologists for the present situation protest too much. Something (fairly complicated) has brought this about, which probably could be revealed with a bit of work.

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by purwil (U14677803) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    We can look them up though Stokey Sue.

    Back in a minute. smiley - smiley 
    The online services of many libraries have access from any computer to old newspaper (and thus what was on telly) archives for ticket holders. Wolverhampton (Mirror/Express) and Southwark (Times) libraries were both happy to send a ticket out to me who lives nowhere near either.

    And there was a lot of rubbish on.

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  • Message 22

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    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    SB is talking about a subtle difference between then and now. There was a better kind of populist stuff then.

     


    A better kind of populist stuff?

    I think Strictly would stand up pretty well against The Black & White Minstrel Show

    And Eggheads against Animal Vegetable or Mineral (that's without even draggin in the vastly superior QI)

    And we talk about repeats now - one of the days I looked up was Chirstmas Eve 1954 - Amahl and the Night Visitors - an operetta by Menotti. The Beeb showed it every Christmas for years, to the point where I DO remember it - a bit grim when the choice was BBC or ITV if you could get it (which we couldn't until the 60s) Not really populist - even 50 odd years ago operetta was a minority taste, and I don't think Amahl's a particularly wonderful example

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  • Message 23

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    Posted by Lighten Up (U15801316) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Many years ago I remember John Noakes saying, "All TV is rubbish." I remember thinking at the time that that was an eccentric opinion from an eccentric presenter. But as the years have passed I now see that John Noakes wasn't far wrong. Even the best TV drama doesn't beat a good feature film or theatre production. Even the best documentary can't beat a good book on the subject. Even the news programmes can't compete with a comprehensive newspaper report.

    The one exception might be natural history programmes where occasionally they capture something that has rarely or never been seen by human eyes before.

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  • Message 24

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    Posted by caissier (U14073060) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Many years ago I remember John Noakes saying, "All TV is rubbish." I remember thinking at the time that that was an eccentric opinion from an eccentric presenter. But as the years have passed I now see that John Noakes wasn't far wrong. Even the best TV drama doesn't beat a good feature film or theatre production. Even the best documentary can't beat a good book on the subject. Even the news programmes can't compete with a comprehensive newspaper report.

    The one exception might be natural history programmes where occasionally they capture something that has rarely or never been seen by human eyes before. 
    There's a lot of opinion now that the best tv is better than film .... such as The Sopranos v Goodfellas (made a few years before) ..... but any medium can be used well if it plays to its capabilities and strengths. True a book is better than a documentary but tv disseminates its message widely and popularly and, with moving pictures, revealsthings a book can't and with editing, can create unique feelings for a subject ..... and bring together a variety of sources; talking heads should not be dismissed.

    In the past "All TV is rubbish." ..... well, possibly, in a way but when there was only three then four channels one took it more seriously and different people imo can get different things from what they see or scrutinise. It's a subjectiv outcome-result of viewed and viewer.

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  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    While I agree with Berkoff''s comments, I think he has rose tinted specs on. He said that he wept tears while watching Saturday night BBC, with "Strictly Come Dancing", and mentioned in his youth he watched plays. Has he forgotten "Come Dancing" which occupied Auntie's Saturday night from 1949 to 1998?  I don't remember Come Dancing ever in the Saturday schedules, and certainly never in the timeslot occupied by Strictly.

    My recollection of Come Dancing is 10 o'clock or later on Friday nights.

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  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    As someone who watches neither Eastenders or Holby City, for once I agree with Steven Berkoff. I would be grateful if the BBC or any TV company would produce some programmes for grown up people. Not just violent murders etc or so called quiz programmes with a shreaking audience  Ever watched Pointless, University Challenge, Only Connect?

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  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by longmemoryintv (U15477482) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    SB is talking about a subtle difference between then and now. There was a better kind of populist stuff then.

    It seems obvious to me there's a serious cultural malaise upon us now. Once there was a desire to achieve intelligence and demanding quality. It was taken for granted that was a good thing. Now the market has overwhelmed that and it's all about demotics and ratings, sales and money - apart from hold-out niches like Horrible Histories. There are many articles now by well-known practitioners, usually getting on now, about how depressed they are by the current state of things. There was one by Mike Figgis a few weeks ago.

    www.theguardian.com/...

    I don't think it's taking rosy specs to the past and apologists for the present situation protest too much. Something (fairly complicated) has brought this about, which probably could be revealed with a bit of work. 
    caissier as usual I wouldn't disagree with you in any way. Totally right. Unfortunately as we get older our opinions and memories are treated as though we are completely senile. Of course there was rubbish being shown then. The point was that there was a valid alternative for people who wanted sensible searching and questioning documentaries where those in authority were called to account; quality arts programmes; new writing .......

    Remember series like 'Edge of Darkness'? 'Doomwatch'? We used to be able to make our own équivalents of 'Wallander' or 'Spiral'. I'd rather see a complete re-run of 'Porridge' than an unbelievably expensive re-make of 'The Great Escape.'

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  • Message 28

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    Posted by purwil (U14677803) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    SB is talking about a subtle difference between then and now. There was a better kind of populist stuff then.

    It seems obvious to me there's a serious cultural malaise upon us now. Once there was a desire to achieve intelligence and demanding quality. It was taken for granted that was a good thing. Now the market has overwhelmed that and it's all about demotics and ratings, sales and money - apart from hold-out niches like Horrible Histories. There are many articles now by well-known practitioners, usually getting on now, about how depressed they are by the current state of things. There was one by Mike Figgis a few weeks ago.

    www.theguardian.com/...

    I don't think it's taking rosy specs to the past and apologists for the present situation protest too much. Something (fairly complicated) has brought this about, which probably could be revealed with a bit of work. 
    caissier as usual I wouldn't disagree with you in any way. Totally right. Unfortunately as we get older our opinions and memories are treated as though we are completely senile. Of course there was rubbish being shown then. The point was that there was a valid alternative for people who wanted sensible searching and questioning documentaries where those in authority were called to account; quality arts programmes; new writing .......

    Remember series like 'Edge of Darkness'? 'Doomwatch'? We used to be able to make our own équivalents of 'Wallander' or 'Spiral'. I'd rather see a complete re-run of 'Porridge' than an unbelievably expensive re-make of 'The Great Escape.' 
    Is it naughty to inform people that on the youtube channel of 'EmperorDalek' you can see UK GOLD repeats of 'Doomwatch'? Seen a couple and thought that some elements of the plots could fit into modern programmes.

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  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Tafkaj (U3674656) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    ... His view is spot on and begs the question, "just what are the BBC doing with the licence fee?" ...  
    you must surely have heard about all the six- and seeven-figure payoffs that BBC execs have been getting over the last few years?!

    ... The OP claims not to have had a licence-but has an issue of how something he does not contribute to is spent ...  
    It's perfectly reasonable to be concerned about how others are being treated/misused. Though Triuqs might not (need to) pay for a licence, he/she might be appalled that others are being forced to pay for a licence but are not be getting anything like good value (in his/her view). Indeed, Triuqs might be a pensioner, for all we know, and is therefore entitled to a free licence, having paid for one for fifty-odd years.

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  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by caissier (U14073060) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    SB is talking about a subtle difference between then and now. There was a better kind of populist stuff then.

     


    A better kind of populist stuff?

    I think Strictly would stand up pretty well against The Black & White Minstrel Show

    And Eggheads against Animal Vegetable or Mineral (that's without even draggin in the vastly superior QI)

    And we talk about repeats now - one of the days I looked up was Chirstmas Eve 1954 - Amahl and the Night Visitors - an operetta by Menotti. The Beeb showed it every Christmas for years, to the point where I DO remember it - a bit grim when the choice was BBC or ITV if you could get it (which we couldn't until the 60s) Not really populist - even 50 odd years ago operetta was a minority taste, and I don't think Amahl's a particularly wonderful example 
    One can go across the mass of output over the years and make points based on various examples ..... which makes discussion tricky.

    ..... but I do feel there has been, overall, a kind of decline, even degradation - caused by different things. Vaguely it feels like it is to do with education which doesn't have the certainties it once had ..... and a loss of simplicity in the making of things which kept them close to a human experience.

    I think of Betjeman's tv films .... there was a tv series he made with Ed Mirzoeff - Bird's Eye View, using a camera in a helicopter ..... joyful and enrapturing and simple. There's nothing like that now. There couldn't be.

    en.wikipedia.org/wik...

    No Bird's Eye View on Youey so ........

    www.youtube.com/watc...

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  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Pizza (U2178233) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Berkoff by name, berk by nature.

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  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Pizza (U2178233) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    We seem to get these sorts of comments from one individual or another every August. Coincidence or concerted campaign is difficult to ascertain, but one thing is certain, the various Edinburgh festival events are gathering places not only for the great and the good of our creative industries, but also a lot of out-of-touch chin-strokers and idiots of the prize-winning variety.

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  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by maestaf (U14145694) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Whilst Mr Berkoff hit the mark with many of his comments, he picked the wrong target in Strictly. As has been pointed out, the BBC featured the Home Counties dancing against the South West for years and Strictly was an innovative update of that format. When it began, I don't recall there being any programmes about dancing on TV, despite it clearly being a popular pastime. Furthermore, Strictly has been sold and shown around the world. Contrast that with the Voice, which has been purchased at enormous expense at a time when there is hardly a lack of talent shows on British TV. It is very depressing, and speaks volumes about the BBC's "overpaid managers", that the man who brought us the Voice has been promoted.

    Strictly is most emphatically not my cup of tea, but it is the kind of programme the BBC should be doing. I also noted how dire last week's BBC One Schedule was. Not only was DIY SOS offered at 9pm, but on three of the other four nights there was a police drama, one of which was a repeat. The BBC's managers clearly are overpaid if that is their idea of high quality, distinctive programming.

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  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    I once shared the stage with Steven Berkoff. We fought over a chair. The chair broke. It wasn't supposed to. One of us fell over. It wasn't me.

    As I understand it the main thrust of his, TV related, comments were aimed at the BBC's seeming need to compete with ITV, for ratings presumably, which has led to the breakdown of the quality of the programming. He wasn't expressly harking for "the good old days" or, even, saying that everything was rosy in the garden five decades, or so, ago.

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  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by mismatched (U14242423) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    As someone who watches neither Eastenders or Holby City, for once I agree with Steven Berkoff. I would be grateful if the BBC or any TV company would produce some programmes for grown up people. Not just violent murders etc or so called quiz programmes with a shreaking audience  Ever watched Pointless, University Challenge, Only Connect?  I watch all three programmes, one is a 45 minute programme, the other two are only half hour programmes, so all are relatively short. None of them have shreaking audiences.
    I just want some decent series such as Last Tango in Halifax. Yes, I know it was sentimental but so I understand is Eastenders and its not so jolly Cockernies

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  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    It isn't that there was only a "better kind of populist stuff" - there was also better drama and the arts.

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  • Message 37

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    Posted by Peta (U24) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Which programmes were you thinking of in particular oldmanriver?

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  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    It isn't that there was only a "better kind of populist stuff" - there was also better drama and the arts.  ..and for me, BBC4 has been the channel to catch the best new dram and classic stuff like I Claudius.

    Of course, let's not forget successful new(er) stuff like New Tricks and Sherlock.

    In the last ten years there's also been Hustle, Life On Mars and Ashes to Ashes.

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  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by caissier (U14073060) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    It isn't that there was only a "better kind of populist stuff" - there was also better drama and the arts.  I think so too .... more rigour, discipline, strictness. All those Wednesday Plays / Plays for Today ..... The Shock of the New ..... etc etc ..... plays by David Rudkin .....

    www.youtube.com/watc...

    They are of their time but overall the seriousness of purpose hasn't been kept up.

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  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 37.

    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Going back a long way - the original Horizons - cutting edge science
    Drama - "I Claudius" - "Abigail's Party", "Pride and Prejudice" (definately not the most recent version), "Barchester Chronicles" and as a child I was riveted by the BBC's adaption of the "Eagle of the Ninth" , and by the French series of "Robinson Crusoe" - the theme tune to the latter only has to begin and I am back - toast in hand - riveted to the telly.

    What is missing from modern soaps is beauty of language and imagination.

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  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) ** on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    I always think that when people start looking back at the past through rose coloured spectacles its a sign of ageing and Mr Berkoff is showing his age. As far as stage actors are concerned has he never seen Kenneth Branagh or Mark Rylance in the Globe's recent Twelfth Night. Stephen Fry in the same play was a revelation.

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  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by Phrasmotic 4 August 2012 (U5509534) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Going back a long way - the original Horizons - cutting edge science
    Drama - "I Claudius" - "Abigail's Party", "Pride and Prejudice" (definately not the most recent version), "Barchester Chronicles" and as a child I was riveted by the BBC's adaption of the "Eagle of the Ninth" , and by the French series of "Robinson Crusoe" - the theme tune to the latter only has to begin and I am back - toast in hand - riveted to the telly.

    What is missing from modern soaps is beauty of language and imagination. 
    There have been at least three versions of Pride and Prejudice on BBC TV (1967, 1980, 1995). Robinson Crusoe had a wonderful theme tune.

    Why do you use the term "modern soaps"? Are you saying that Compact or The Newcomers had elegant language/imagination?

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  • Message 43

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    Posted by oldmanriver (U14455170) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    The Pride and Prejudice one I meant the 1995 version. There has been a more recent version - may have been a telfilm but it was dire.

    As to "Compact or the "Newcomers" - never heard of them - so can't make any comparisons.

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  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) ** on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    And I watched almost with tears because I remembered when I was 17, 18 I used to see Hamlet and Death Of A Salesman on a Saturday night. That educated me."   Both written for the theatre and best seen there. This was obviously in the days before TV had developed its own drama.

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  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Lemon Sabotage (U9577550) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    I always think that when people start looking back at the past through rose coloured spectacles its a sign of ageing and Mr Berkoff is showing his age. As far as stage actors are concerned has he never seen Kenneth Branagh or Mark Rylance in the Globe's recent Twelfth Night. Stephen Fry in the same play was a revelation.  Or Simon Russell Beale who is apparently a superb stage actor.

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  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Bonny (U14396592) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    The moderators never post to the boards. The BBC staff, like me and Lee have our name in Italics so that you can easily identify us.  

    I have learned something this evening Peta. I always thought you were a moderator. smiley - blush

    So, you are BBC staff. May I ask politely what this entails exactly?

    By the way......*Naughty Peta*!

    Like Me and....? Lee and I....?

    See me after school. smiley - laugh

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  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) ** on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    I always think that when people start looking back at the past through rose coloured spectacles its a sign of ageing and Mr Berkoff is showing his age. As far as stage actors are concerned has he never seen Kenneth Branagh or Mark Rylance in the Globe's recent Twelfth Night. Stephen Fry in the same play was a revelation.  Or Simon Russell Beale who is apparently a superb stage actor.  I'll second that.

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  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 47.

    Posted by Aviator_Of-Death (U14289138) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    Steven Berkoff has a good point. Up to a point. There is a lot of dross on TV at the moment. I can't bear soaps, property, or endless programmes featuring sunbedded fools jetting off to live in an off-milk coloured box in Spain.

    Trouble is, loads of people do, and as Mr Berkoff should understand, having taken on roles in heavyweight artistic productions like Beverley Hills Cop and Rambo 3 (or was it 2) in order to enable him to do his much respected theatre stuff, you can't always be high brow.

    Berkoff's point is;

    1) The BBC is producing mass entertainment dross in order to gain viewers to compete with ITV. Daily Mail will no doubt seize upon this tomorrow "BBC Dumbed Down, doesn't deserve license fee blah blah."

    The counterpoint is;

    2) The BBC goes to a more heavyweight programming, and sheds millions of viewers. Berkoff happy. Daily Mail says "BBC loses viewers with elitist programming, doesn't deserve license fee blah blah blah."

    It's a tightrope. One that is being fallen off time time again at the moment.

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  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Bonny (U14396592) on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    I would like to point out that I am a pensioner, and have paid the fee for years.

    Also, I am fully compos-mentis, and having read through all the posts empathise with many for different reasons which I won't indulge as that could be tedious.... so many viewpoints, so many reasons, so many ages.....fair enough.

    However. Regardless of personal taste and reasons for - Overall there is disquiet, and it's there for a reason: The BBC are part of our heritage, a reliable voice during times of trouble and crisis. I'm sure all would agree with that.

    But......and a big but - a wonderful parent is ailing, seeming unable to operate as usual. Occasionally, a strength emerges, and we are thrilled to see it's all hunky dory again......we all want to see a recovery.

    But sadly, apart from fleeting genius, it flags, and seemingly continues in some areas to do so. So, we have a forum in which to bemoan this fact. This is good, but to be fair us oldies had no such venting apparatus when young.

    So, we moan and groan, and give reason, but answer or response from whomever seems nil. This is a shame as 'whatever goes around comes around' and one day the serpent might bite it's own tail and perish.

    This is the main thrust of complaint, and I so wish someone of Churchillian stature could rescue our beloved British Broadcasting Association.

    This is simply my take.

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  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) ** on Tuesday, 6th August 2013

    It's a tightrope. One that is being fallen off time time again at the moment.  I'm not sure that is true. BBC1 is the most popular channel based on audience numbers at the moment thus satisfying its remit while there are more Prom concerts than ever on BBC4.

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