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No more squeezed credits?!

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Messages: 1 - 32 of 32
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Rosemary (U7231409) on Tuesday, 16th July 2013

    I have just seen an article in which the new BBC Director General, Tony Hall, says that the Corporation is going to stop squeezing credits at the end of TV drama.

    Can this really be true? Hurrah! smiley - ok smiley - magic

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Tuesday, 16th July 2013

    Read all about it on the main thread Rosemary.

    www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Rosemary (U7231409) on Tuesday, 16th July 2013

    Oh blow me down, Dover Soul, I could have sworn there wasn't a thread already!! smiley - grr I did look, honest. smiley - blush Sorry.

    Still good news, though!

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Tuesday, 16th July 2013

    No need to say sorry. Just thought you would like to see it. smiley - hug

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by st3ph3n (U13643748) on Tuesday, 16th July 2013

    I have just seen an article in which the new BBC Director General, Tony Hall, says that the Corporation is going to stop squeezing credits at the end of TV drama.

    Can this really be true? Hurrah! smiley - ok smiley - magic 
    Only on TV drama ..... that sounds like it will continue on ALL other programme-types.
    If they stop it with drama, surely that is an acceptance of the fact that it is NOT good practice as people don't like it and want it.

    Just leave the 10-15 seconds to the natural ending of the programme.

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by st3ph3n (U13643748) on Tuesday, 16th July 2013

    NOT good practice as people don't like it and want it.  

    that should be "and don't want it"

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by deansay (U5811575) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    Only on TV drama ..... that sounds like it will continue on ALL other programme-types.
    If they stop it with drama, surely that is an acceptance of the fact that it is NOT good practice as people don't like it and want it.

    Just leave the 10-15 seconds to the natural ending of the programme. 


    I agree, but lets be grateful for one small victory smiley - biggrin

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Technicolour (U4590479) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    If that is true it is good news. I am liking this new man more and more.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by suegwent (U15743665) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    Yep this does sound like good news. Hope the tendency of BBCIplayer "more info" to drop the cast list will be reversed.......

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    I know that they're working on ensuring that the music played is added more often to the webpages too - the team responsible for that have been in touch with me. smiley - ok

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by suegwent (U15743665) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    I know that they're working on ensuring that the music played is added more often to the webpages too - the team responsible for that have been in touch with me. smiley - ok  Great - don't know how to do the thumbs up symbol but thumbs up to that

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    If you hover over any smiley the code used to make it appear appears over it.

    You then just put the word within < >

    This one is spread out so you can see it < ok > just take away the spaces and you have smiley - ok

    smiley - smiley

    And yes, good news again, the BBC can be slow but they are trying to improve in lots of areas. smiley - smiley

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by suegwent (U15743665) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    smiley - ok Thanks Peta

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by deansay (U5811575) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    I know that they're working on ensuring that the music played is added more often to the webpages too - the team responsible for that have been in touch with me. smiley - ok  You mean that the BBC departments are beginning to talk to one another? smiley - winkeye

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by GaryB007 (U3895241) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    PLEASE make DOGs the next target.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Alf Hartigan (U2277114) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    I have just seen an article in which the new BBC Director General, Tony Hall, says that the Corporation is going to stop squeezing credits at the end of TV drama. 

    I wonder why they are going to do that.

    Up to now, people on this message board have been told they are a small and unrepresentative bunch of whingers, so it can't be anything to do with what they've been complaining about for years.

    They must have been listening to someone else.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    Or alternatively...

    That's great news! Thanks BBC - I'm glad you were listening!

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Alf Hartigan (U2277114) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    That's great news! Thanks BBC - I'm glad you were listening finally to this bunch of unrepresentative whingers, who, in the past, you have disregarded as being out of touch with what everyone else wants.

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    It's a pleasure Alf! smiley - ok I'm just so pleased that you appreciate it, it's so nice to get positive feedback when we do something that you think is right. smiley - winkeye

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Alf Hartigan (U2277114) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    Don't mention it.

    As you are well aware, the BBC is always right, whether it disregards persistent complaints because the views are ‘a minority and unrepresentative of the vast majority’, or ‘you’re finally listening to what has been said time and time again for years’, and now want the credit for it.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Vickytorious (U14098212) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    I have just seen an article in which the new BBC Director General, Tony Hall, says that the Corporation is going to stop squeezing credits at the end of TV drama.

    Can this really be true? Hurrah! smiley - ok smiley - magic 
    That is good news....and at the same time could they please stop the practice of whizzing the credits up the screen at such break-neck speed that you can't read them, even if they aren't squeezed?

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    I believe that the speed they scroll mainly depends on the length of the credits.

    For some programmes, particularly films, they can be very long and would take a very long time to scroll up if it were done at a slow speed.

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by SAB888 (U14777346) on Wednesday, 17th July 2013

    I believe that the speed they scroll mainly depends on the length of the credits.

    For some programmes, particularly films, they can be very long and would take a very long time to scroll up if it were done at a slow speed. 
    I can't recall seeing a film that has end credits scrolling too fast. An average time for a film end credit is probably around 4 to 5 minutes but I've seen some that are over 7 minutes and readable.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by st3ph3n (U13643748) on Thursday, 18th July 2013

    I believe that the speed they scroll mainly depends on the length of the credits.

    For some programmes, particularly films, they can be very long and would take a very long time to scroll up if it were done at a slow speed. 
    Surely the logical and common-sense answer (to the speed of scrolling) should be governed by the speed of READING the credits.
    What is the point of falling down the staircase of upward-shooting credits that are impossible to focus on ?

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 23.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 18th July 2013

    I believe that the speed they scroll mainly depends on the length of the credits.

    For some programmes, particularly films, they can be very long and would take a very long time to scroll up if it were done at a slow speed. 
    I can't recall seeing a film that has end credits scrolling too fast. An average time for a film end credit is probably around 4 to 5 minutes but I've seen some that are over 7 minutes and readable. 
    So would you be happy to have 4-5 minutes, but perhaps 7 minutes of your TV time spent on credits?

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by ninemaidens (U10751091) on Thursday, 18th July 2013

    I believe that the speed they scroll mainly depends on the length of the credits.

    For some programmes, particularly films, they can be very long and would take a very long time to scroll up if it were done at a slow speed. 
    I can't recall seeing a film that has end credits scrolling too fast. An average time for a film end credit is probably around 4 to 5 minutes but I've seen some that are over 7 minutes and readable. 
    So would you be happy to have 4-5 minutes, but perhaps 7 minutes of your TV time spent on credits? 
    I would rather have no credits than everyone including who makes the sandwiches, and being quite unable to read them!
    I suspect most people are interested in the cast and possible, the director, music(which is usually not mentioned) and possibly location if appropriate.
    We ll done Tony Hall, he is off to a good start by actually responding to licence payers concerns, a n.ovel experience, long may it continue

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Chris Rogers (U10129711) on Thursday, 18th July 2013

    I believe that the speed they scroll mainly depends on the length of the credits.

    For some programmes, particularly films, they can be very long and would take a very long time to scroll up if it were done at a slow speed. 
    I can't recall seeing a film that has end credits scrolling too fast. An average time for a film end credit is probably around 4 to 5 minutes but I've seen some that are over 7 minutes and readable. 
    So would you be happy to have 4-5 minutes, but perhaps 7 minutes of your TV time spent on credits? 
    Yes, because "my TV time", as you put it, is most enjoyably spent watching the complete piece of content as its maker intended, whether that's a TV show or a cinema film.

    Full credit runs, at normal speed, used to be shown on most channels and the BBC in particular until Xmas 1993, when the practice of speeding up the scroll started.

    Film 4 still runs full credits at normal speed though, and very good it is too.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Vickytorious (U14098212) on Thursday, 18th July 2013

    I believe that the speed they scroll mainly depends on the length of the credits.

    For some programmes, particularly films, they can be very long and would take a very long time to scroll up if it were done at a slow speed. 
    My post wasn't prompted by film credits Peta. I very rarely watch Holby City but did the other night and was mildly interested to know who a particular character was played by. No chance; the credits whizzed up the screen at a speed that made them impossible to read. As has been said, you might as well not bother to show them at all if the audience can't read them. I wonder if the showing of credits is something that Equity and other broadcast unions insist on and, like the "small print" gabble on commercial radio adverts, is got around by running them too fast to be read/understood. The letter of the law is adhered to rather than the spirit perhaps?

    I know I can go onto the internet to find the information if I am sufficiently interested but the truth of the matter is I (and I suspect most others) rarely am. It tends to be an immediate thing of passing interest, soon forgotten and not acted upon later. I want to know at the time I'm watching...and anyway, there are still those without access to the internet, believe it or not.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 18th July 2013

    You don't have a pause button that you can use Vickytorious? I know that everyone doesn't - but I find mine really helpful for this...

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by GARGLEBLASTER (U3191065) on Thursday, 18th July 2013

    It's a pleasure Alf! smiley - ok I'm just so pleased that you appreciate it, it's so nice to get positive feedback when we do something that you think is right. smiley - winkeye  I'll believe it when I actually see it.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by Vickytorious (U14098212) on Thursday, 18th July 2013

    You don't have a pause button that you can use Vickytorious? I know that everyone doesn't - but I find mine really helpful for this...  Indeed I do Peta but I don't always have my PVR switched on and there is no pause facility on my TV on its own. It really should not be necessary anyway. Surely it is a small enough thing to ask for? I can't even see that it would cost the BBC any money to speak of!

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by SAB888 (U14777346) on Thursday, 18th July 2013

    I believe that the speed they scroll mainly depends on the length of the credits.

    For some programmes, particularly films, they can be very long and would take a very long time to scroll up if it were done at a slow speed. 
    I can't recall seeing a film that has end credits scrolling too fast. An average time for a film end credit is probably around 4 to 5 minutes but I've seen some that are over 7 minutes and readable. 
    So would you be happy to have 4-5 minutes, but perhaps 7 minutes of your TV time spent on credits? 
    A film has many hundreds of names listed because it's a huge production and a TV programme would not take anywhere near a minute and probably less to scroll all the credits at a readable speed.

    Report message32

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