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Red Ken on This Week

Messages: 1 - 21 of 21
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by alan997 (U1233723) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    Thought he made a pretty good stand in for Alan Johnson this week. I particularly enjoyed his little tussle with AN over Tory party funding, in the context of the hoohah over Labour's union links, which as best I recall went something like:

    Ken: Hedge funds give £25 million to the Tory Party, and in return the government gives them a tax break worth £145 million.
    Neil: Of course that tax break applies not just to hedge funds but to all financial asset funds.
    Ken: Sure. Even the left wing asset funds.

    I was very impressed by Mylene Klass too. Ignorant as I am about modern 'culture', I had to google to find out who she even was, but I thought she came across as very clued-up and articulate, and held her own ably in her exchanges with the Blue Nun Boys. A cut above the usual celebrity-numpty guest.

    All in all, a good edition, I thought. Still the one essential political programme of the week.

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  • Message 2

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    Posted by z4mster (U14864348) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    He does a very good radio show, with David Mellor, on most Saturday mornings on a London based station available on the internet, but ever less so on DAB.

    I've worked with Mylene Klass. A text book example of Never Judge Book by Its Cover. Lovely.

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    I think Ken Livingstone has the same political asset as Boris Johnson - he's a bloke you feel you could enjoy a pint with in a pub. I'm sure all politicians are human beings but too many of them have learned to behave like robots. smiley - smiley

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  • Message 4

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    Posted by alan997 (U1233723) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    I think Ken Livingstone has the same political asset as Boris Johnson - he's a bloke you feel you could enjoy a pint with in a pub. I'm sure all politicians are human beings but too many of them have learned to behave like robots. smiley - smiley  I went to see him speak once, when I was a student. When he took questions at the end, someone in the audience asked one and he stopped, paused, and said: "I don't know. That's a very good question. I'll have to think about that." It was the only time I ever saw a politician honestly and simply admitting that he didn't have all the answers.

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    Thought he made a pretty good stand in for Alan Johnson this week. I particularly enjoyed his little tussle with AN over Tory party funding, in the context of the hoohah over Labour's union links, which as best I recall went something like:

    Ken: Hedge funds give £25 million to the Tory Party, and in return the government gives them a tax break worth £145 million.
    Neil: Of course that tax break applies not just to hedge funds but to all financial asset funds.
    Ken: Sure. Even the left wing asset funds.

    I was very impressed by Mylene Klass too. Ignorant as I am about modern 'culture', I had to google to find out who she even was, but I thought she came across as very clued-up and articulate, and held her own ably in her exchanges with the Blue Nun Boys. A cut above the usual celebrity-numpty guest.

    All in all, a good edition, I thought. Still the one essential political programme of the week. 
    If your idea of an "essential" political programme includes awful puns from AN, stupid childish graphics / presentation and a string of "celebrities" to appease the intellectually challenged then you are absolutely right. If however you seek proper discussion and contributions from people who have the appropriate credentials to offer valid opinions then you are most definitely wrong.

    In keeping with the BBC serious programming, This Week has descend to pantomime levels.

    I would agree that KL is eloquent and interesting. Equally Portillo does speak sense from (surprisingly) a neutral perspective however even they cannot raise the programme above the dumb down line.

    As soon as I saw the over exposed Mylene Klass I remembered what This Week had become and switched off. incidentally I see that Ms Klass is a "Broadcaster and Entrepeneur", does anyone on TV not qualify for such generalisations. The celeb culture has watered down so much in its infiltration of all that we are offered.

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by alan997 (U1233723) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    Thought he made a pretty good stand in for Alan Johnson this week. I particularly enjoyed his little tussle with AN over Tory party funding, in the context of the hoohah over Labour's union links, which as best I recall went something like:

    Ken: Hedge funds give £25 million to the Tory Party, and in return the government gives them a tax break worth £145 million.
    Neil: Of course that tax break applies not just to hedge funds but to all financial asset funds.
    Ken: Sure. Even the left wing asset funds.

    I was very impressed by Mylene Klass too. Ignorant as I am about modern 'culture', I had to google to find out who she even was, but I thought she came across as very clued-up and articulate, and held her own ably in her exchanges with the Blue Nun Boys. A cut above the usual celebrity-numpty guest.

    All in all, a good edition, I thought. Still the one essential political programme of the week. 
    If your idea of an "essential" political programme includes awful puns from AN, stupid childish graphics / presentation and a string of "celebrities" to appease the intellectually challenged then you are absolutely right. If however you seek proper discussion and contributions from people who have the appropriate credentials to offer valid opinions then you are most definitely wrong.

    In keeping with the BBC serious programming, This Week has descend to pantomime levels.

    I would agree that KL is eloquent and interesting. Equally Portillo does speak sense from (surprisingly) a neutral perspective however even they cannot raise the programme above the dumb down line.

    As soon as I saw the over exposed Mylene Klass I remembered what This Week had become and switched off. incidentally I see that Ms Klass is a "Broadcaster and Entrepeneur", does anyone on TV not qualify for such generalisations. The celeb culture has watered down so much in its infiltration of all that we are offered. 
    If your idea of an "essential" political programme includes awful puns from AN, stupid childish graphics / presentation and a string of "celebrities" to appease the intellectually challenged then you are absolutely right. If however you seek proper discussion and contributions from people who have the appropriate credentials to offer valid opinions then you are most definitely wrong. 
    I could do without the puns and silly graphics, and I personally think the celebrity guests are generally a waste of time. Nevertheless, I also think the programme does indeed include "proper discussion and contributions from people who have the appropriate credentials to offer valid opinions" - the likes of Portillo, Livingston and Alan Johnson being excellent examples - which is precisely what makes it "essential". It's the one place of television where you see people from 'the Westminster Village 'off-piste', away from minders and PR wonks, and engaging in honest discussion of the day's issues, with the benefit of the insider's perspective.

    And every now and then - as with Mylene Klass - the guests surprise you, by having interesting and relevant things to say.

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by alan997 (U1233723) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    *sigh*...

    why can't this board get an 'edit' facility? Forums on roller skating have them, but not the BBC...(maybe they spent all the money on Those Payoffs...)

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    I'm surprised that Myleene Klass gets such a hostile reception from many people.

    To me she seems just perfect.

    . . . . . maybe that's what annoys some of us! smiley - biggrin

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by Rumbaba (U13744896) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    Thought he made a pretty good stand in for Alan Johnson this week. I particularly enjoyed his little tussle with AN over Tory party funding, in the context of the hoohah over Labour's union links, which as best I recall went something like:

    Ken: Hedge funds give £25 million to the Tory Party, and in return the government gives them a tax break worth £145 million.
    Neil: Of course that tax break applies not just to hedge funds but to all financial asset funds.
    Ken: Sure. Even the left wing asset funds.

    I was very impressed by Mylene Klass too. Ignorant as I am about modern 'culture', I had to google to find out who she even was, but I thought she came across as very clued-up and articulate, and held her own ably in her exchanges with the Blue Nun Boys. A cut above the usual celebrity-numpty guest.

    All in all, a good edition, I thought. Still the one essential political programme of the week. 
    If your idea of an "essential" political programme includes awful puns from AN, stupid childish graphics / presentation and a string of "celebrities" to appease the intellectually challenged then you are absolutely right. If however you seek proper discussion and contributions from people who have the appropriate credentials to offer valid opinions then you are most definitely wrong.

    In keeping with the BBC serious programming, This Week has descend to pantomime levels.

    I would agree that KL is eloquent and interesting. Equally Portillo does speak sense from (surprisingly) a neutral perspective however even they cannot raise the programme above the dumb down line.

    As soon as I saw the over exposed Mylene Klass I remembered what This Week had become and switched off. incidentally I see that Ms Klass is a "Broadcaster and Entrepeneur", does anyone on TV not qualify for such generalisations. The celeb culture has watered down so much in its infiltration of all that we are offered. 
    If your idea of an "essential" political programme includes awful puns from AN, stupid childish graphics / presentation and a string of "celebrities" to appease the intellectually challenged then you are absolutely right. If however you seek proper discussion and contributions from people who have the appropriate credentials to offer valid opinions then you are most definitely wrong. 
    I could do without the puns and silly graphics, and I personally think the celebrity guests are generally a waste of time. Nevertheless, I also think the programme does indeed include "proper discussion and contributions from people who have the appropriate credentials to offer valid opinions" - the likes of Portillo, Livingston and Alan Johnson being excellent examples - which is precisely what makes it "essential". It's the one place of television where you see people from 'the Westminster Village 'off-piste', away from minders and PR wonks, and engaging in honest discussion of the day's issues, with the benefit of the insider's perspective.

    And every now and then - as with Mylene Klass - the guests surprise you, by having interesting and relevant things to say. 
    This programme almost became a parody of itself but I think it is very slowly creeping back in the right direction, maybe a blip but let's see. Whatever your politics, Ken is a good TV performer. Myleen is no airhead and I think she is quite refreshing compared to a lot of TV celeb types.

    I've probably said it already on here but the programme with Vincent Hannah and Andrew Rawnsley, that used to be on years ago, knocks this into a cocked hat. Andrew Neil is poor and the format has a tired feel. Also, it's on too late - Sunday afternoon would be better.

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by maestaf (U14145694) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    With the inclusion of Red Ken, the program reverted a little towards the original idea of having two politicians who would not slavishly follow the party line comment on the week’s events. This is what makes the programme worth viewing and all the dumbed down celeb nonsense, the journalists trying to be funny and Andrew Neil's rambling introductions are just distractions.

    I thought Myleene Klass was just as vacuous as most of the "guests". I'd love to know how Page 3 is "positive for women" and her idea of combating sexism seemed to be that all women should be like her. It's insight like that which makes the final segment by far the weakest part of the programme and more often than not the cue to switch off.

    The BBC is infected with the idea that politics is boring. Well, it is the way the BBC does it. Why do BBC Managers think that people who have stayed up until nearly midnight to watch a programme about politics have the attention span of a 5 year old with ADD who just drank 3 litres of coke? I am perfectly capable of watching an intelligent conversation and do not need to be reminded that the "celeb" will be on soon and have never thought that what political discussion needs is journalists dressing up in silly clothes.

    Undoubtedly, the star of the show is Portillo. He's always interesting and still has the power to shock sometimes with his candid criticisms of the Conservatives. If it were 30 minutes of Andrew Neil interviewing Portillo, it would be a lot cheaper, more entertaining and interesting.

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  • Message 11

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    Posted by eviled2 (U14446578) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    The men came across as having a much deeper and broader understanding of how the distribution of power across the genders works in a patriarchal society.
    Klass was falling into the common trap of assuming feminism is ‘all about’ naming, blaming and shaming certain sexist behaviours and attitudes (without analyzing why these behaviours and attitudes are so entrenched) or that it's 'all about' a woman’s right to ‘choose’ (without any real awareness that women’s choices are usually between two or more patriarchal options).
    Possibly because of their age and their radical political leanings, the two male guests kept trying to bring her back to seeing the long-term perspective of certain sexist behaviours and attitudes, as well as the pervasive influence of the strictly non-feminist media, which she kept rejecting.
    Klass' defence of page 3 was a clear illustration of Upton Sinclair's principle: "'difficult for someone to understand something when their salary depends on their not understanding it": She has profited greatly from the bikini shot, so that's why she struggles to see it as demeaning to women.
    Klass espouses the typical confused and diluted version of feminism-lite that the media has brainwashed women into accepting.

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Hy Dranger (U14569978) on Friday, 12th July 2013

    I've worked with Mylene Klass. A text book example of Never Judge Book by Its Cover..  Are you saying she's ugly?

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  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by maestaf (U14145694) on Saturday, 13th July 2013

    The men came across as having a much deeper and broader understanding of how the distribution of power across the genders works in a patriarchal society.
    Klass was falling into the common trap of assuming feminism is ‘all about’ naming, blaming and shaming certain sexist behaviours and attitudes (without analyzing why these behaviours and attitudes are so entrenched) or that it's 'all about' a woman’s right to ‘choose’ (without any real awareness that women’s choices are usually between two or more patriarchal options).
    Possibly because of their age and their radical political leanings, the two male guests kept trying to bring her back to seeing the long-term perspective of certain sexist behaviours and attitudes, as well as the pervasive influence of the strictly non-feminist media, which she kept rejecting.
    Klass' defence of page 3 was a clear illustration of Upton Sinclair's principle: "'difficult for someone to understand something when their salary depends on their not understanding it": She has profited greatly from the bikini shot, so that's why she struggles to see it as demeaning to women.
    Klass espouses the typical confused and diluted version of feminism-lite that the media has brainwashed women into accepting. 
    Blimey! A well argued and rational analysis of why that discussion was so unsatisfying. Note to This Week Producers: If you invite celebs you will get platitudinous, lightweight rubbish that is as interesting and challenging as a bodybuilder ripping a tissue in half.

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Saturday, 13th July 2013

    I've worked with Mylene Klass. A text book example of Never Judge Book by Its Cover..  Are you saying she's ugly?  An acquired taste in my opinion.... one that I have not yet appreciated.

    Mylene is a BBC favourite so any excuse to put her on the screen, Lottery Show to This Week, God knows where this "broadcaster and entrepeneur" finds the time......

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  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by pennyork (U13858151) on Sunday, 14th July 2013

    Exactly how cheap does Portillo come? Just one sentence from Portillo this week, has for me, tarnished his image. When he remarked to Andrew Neil and Ken Livingstone that none of them would get out of bed for the present MP's salary made me realise what an overpaid cosseted fool he is. When MPs get paid three times the national average yet obviously it still isn't enough for himself, Neil and Livingstone I just despair at the greed of the BBC/Westminster set.

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Hy Dranger (U14569978) on Sunday, 14th July 2013

    I didn't hear what she said, but things like topless modelling are a complex issue for feminism since there is an inherent conflict between the right of women to be free to do what they want, and the desire that they not be objectified or exploited by a sexist soicety. So there are certainly at least two sides to the issue and if Mylene Klass was the only person to stand up for the right of women to choose an occupation that others might disapprove of, more power to her I say.

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  • Message 18

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    Posted by BooBoo2 (U1168789) on Monday, 15th July 2013

    I didn't hear what she said, but things like topless modelling are a complex issue for feminism since there is an inherent conflict between the right of women to be free to do what they want, and the desire that they not be objectified or exploited by a sexist soicety. So there are certainly at least two sides to the issue and if Mylene Klass was the only person to stand up for the right of women to choose an occupation that others might disapprove of, more power to her I say.  It might have been more interesting if this point of view had been presented by somebody who had actually done page 3 modelling (say Melinda Messenger) as others like LBC had offered. But there again, as I have said, any excuse to give MK some air-time at the Beeb.

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  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Monday, 15th July 2013

    I believe that Playboy offered her a six-figure deal to pose nude for their magazine. I don't think she actually did it though - unless anyone knows differently?

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  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by goodhelenstar (U13943062) on Monday, 15th July 2013

    Exactly how cheap does Portillo come? Just one sentence from Portillo this week, has for me, tarnished his image. When he remarked to Andrew Neil and Ken Livingstone that none of them would get out of bed for the present MP's salary made me realise what an overpaid cosseted fool he is. When MPs get paid three times the national average yet obviously it still isn't enough for himself, Neil and Livingstone I just despair at the greed of the BBC/Westminster set.  I was quite shocked to hear him say this. Like many, I've been impressed with his contributions to This Week and his railway journeys and other documentaries have painted a completely different figure to the one I remember as a minister in Mrs T's government. He has often said that he wished he's gone on his railway journeys while an MP as it would have affected his judgement. Yet this one sentence, perhaps a slip of the tongue as a result of being obliged to share the sofa with Ken - not great mates, I imagine! - has, as you say, tarnished his image. Interesting that neither Ken nor Andrew Neil challenged him on it.

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  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Portly (U1381981) on Monday, 15th July 2013

    Portillo's right - £67,000 per annum isn't much compared to the salaries of most business and professional men and women. If a really talented person wants to be an MP, they are likely to have to sacrifice the pay they could have earned elsewhere. I'm not sure why anyone would want to make that sacrifice in order to be goaded by the media and reviled by the general public.

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