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Weather Forecast

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Messages: 1 - 50 of 68
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by TeenaandCleo (U15746512) on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    Do a little test. Watch the weather forecast on BBC both national and then local. Then turn your PC on and look at the weather forecast on the BBC News website and then the Met Office website. On many occasions one thing will strike you. All four give a different forecast. This is particularly noticeable for the weather for the next 24 hours. Yesterday for my area BBC 1 national predicted it would be dry for the next 24 hours. BBC local said it would be wet. The BBC website said it would be cloudy with a little rain. The Met Office website crashed. My advice. Watch Carol Kirkwood on BBC 1, she may not get it right but she is a joy to watch on a warm sunny day.

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by MrT (U15054385) on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    I found all BBC forecasts regularly wrong last week (Thursday forecast to rain all day - not a drop). They usually do better. I agree Carol K is a pleasure to watch and I like her attempts to put a positive spin on our weather unlike some.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    I agree. How do they manage to get them different ?

    I also watch the forecast in Countryfile for the week but usually that doesn't go as predicted.

    I've decided they can only usually forecast for the next 6 to 12 hours, and the forecasts will change very regularly.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by MrT (U15054385) on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    I remember getting cross with the new BBC weather website with its claim of hourly accuracy for the next 2 days and forecasts for the next 10. Their claims need to be taken with a hefty pinch of salt...

    BBC weather is usually too pessimistic and XC Weather too optimistic - take an average between them and it is usually about right!

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Al (U1158256) on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    At least this (Norwegian) website admits uncertainty even in the summary by giving a range of predictions for the amount of rain expected. e.g. tonight for the hour commencing 21:00 "0 – 0.4 mm"
    www.yr.no/place/Unit...

    The BBC website for the same period says simply "light rain". (It does, however, give additional information for humidity, visibility and pressure.
    www.bbc.co.uk/weathe...

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Al (U1158256) on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    (It does, however, give additional information for humidity, visibility and pressure. 

    I've just noticed that the Norwegian site does give humidity and pressure though not on the page to which I linked.
    www.yr.no/place/Unit...

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by bootjangler (U880875) on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    Do a little test. Watch the weather forecast on BBC both national and then local. Then turn your PC on and look at the weather forecast on the BBC News website and then the Met Office website. On many occasions one thing will strike you. All four give a different forecast. This is particularly noticeable for the weather for the next 24 hours. Yesterday for my area BBC 1 national predicted it would be dry for the next 24 hours. BBC local said it would be wet. The BBC website said it would be cloudy with a little rain. The Met Office website crashed. My advice. Watch Carol Kirkwood on BBC 1, she may not get it right but she is a joy to watch on a warm sunny day.  I've done my little test.

    It's encompassed the last 10 years, and it's always exactly as you say.

    I noticed an advert for BBC weather Apps for phones, where they say, "You can get hourly updates," which effectively means, "We'll tell you the weather as you can see it out your window right now."

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by dave (U2043922) on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    Do a little test. Watch the weather forecast on BBC both national and then local. Then turn your PC on and look at the weather forecast on the BBC News website and then the Met Office website. On many occasions one thing will strike you. All four give a different forecast. This is particularly noticeable for the weather for the next 24 hours. Yesterday for my area BBC 1 national predicted it would be dry for the next 24 hours. BBC local said it would be wet. The BBC website said it would be cloudy with a little rain. The Met Office website crashed. My advice. Watch Carol Kirkwood on BBC 1, she may not get it right but she is a joy to watch on a warm sunny day.  I've done my little test.

    It's encompassed the last 10 years, and it's always exactly as you say.

    I noticed an advert for BBC weather Apps for phones, where they say, "You can get hourly updates," which effectively means, "We'll tell you the weather as you can see it out your window right now." 
    Yes I had a laugh at that, changing the forecast every hour smiley - smiley

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Essential Rabbit (U3613943) on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    It's always amazed me that the same people, using the same data, from the same computer climate models, can come up with four completely different forecasts.

    It also surprises me that they frequently don't seem to even know the current weather.
    On Friday, for the whole day, the half hourly weather map on the News channel showed my area as clear with sunshine, whereas we had continuous rain.

    The red button five day forecast changes every few hours, and you can almost guarantee that Friday's forecast on Monday will have no resemblence to Friday's forecast on Thursday.

    And how often do you hear a weather song and dance man/woman admit that, "The weather today wasn't as we forecast"? In my recollection, not since the snow storms that they got wrong, back whenever.

    I find the forecasts so inaccurate these days that they are more of a hundrance than a help.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by leadedbee (U5555345) ** on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    As others have commented, weather 'forecasts' seem to devote more and more time to telling us what weather we've had, making them more of a 'recast'? Why do they do this?

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Cat In Boots (U13672446) on Sunday, 23rd June 2013

    Do a little test. Watch the weather forecast on BBC both national and then local. Then turn your PC on and look at the weather forecast on the BBC News website and then the Met Office website. 

    This thread is a remux of another (and I haven't spelt that wrongly).

    I have complained to the BBC about the weather forecasting to say the weather charts are no longer present and the postion of the Eastern Atlantic Jet Stream is never mentioned. I was told that inclusion of facts would *confuse* the viewers. This the first time I have been told that too many facts were bad for people smiley - laugh

    So the op is probably pointing out the obvious and nothing will happen about it.

    Again.

    smiley - blackcat

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Gizmomoo (U10999499) on Monday, 24th June 2013

    Add the red button to that test which will also give you a different forecast.

    The red button forecast is actually the most useless as it des not include wind. No point telling me it's going to be dry and 15 degrees if there is a 25 mph wind I don't know about.

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by MrT (U15054385) on Monday, 24th June 2013

    Add the red button to that test which will also give you a different forecast.

    The red button forecast is actually the most useless as it des not include wind. No point telling me it's going to be dry and 15 degrees if there is a 25 mph wind I don't know about. 
    Quite right!

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by jonnyboy (U14965236) on Monday, 24th June 2013

    Do a little test. Watch the weather forecast on BBC both national and then local. Then turn your PC on and look at the weather forecast on the BBC News website and then the Met Office website. On many occasions one thing will strike you. All four give a different forecast. This is particularly noticeable for the weather for the next 24 hours. Yesterday for my area BBC 1 national predicted it would be dry for the next 24 hours. BBC local said it would be wet. The BBC website said it would be cloudy with a little rain. The Met Office website crashed. My advice. Watch Carol Kirkwood on BBC 1, she may not get it right but she is a joy to watch on a warm sunny day.  "Do a little test" Look out the window smiley - doh smiley - doh

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by jonnyboy (U14965236) on Monday, 24th June 2013

    Do a little test. Watch the weather forecast on BBC both national and then local. Then turn your PC on and look at the weather forecast on the BBC News website and then the Met Office website. On many occasions one thing will strike you. All four give a different forecast. This is particularly noticeable for the weather for the next 24 hours. Yesterday for my area BBC 1 national predicted it would be dry for the next 24 hours. BBC local said it would be wet. The BBC website said it would be cloudy with a little rain. The Met Office website crashed. My advice. Watch Carol Kirkwood on BBC 1, she may not get it right but she is a joy to watch on a warm sunny day.  The easiest way i find to check the weather is ( Call me old fashioned ) look out the window

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Colin (U5740997) ** on Monday, 24th June 2013

    Do a little test. Watch the weather forecast on BBC both national and then local. Then turn your PC on and look at the weather forecast on the BBC News website and then the Met Office website. On many occasions one thing will strike you. All four give a different forecast. This is particularly noticeable for the weather for the next 24 hours. Yesterday for my area BBC 1 national predicted it would be dry for the next 24 hours. BBC local said it would be wet. The BBC website said it would be cloudy with a little rain. The Met Office website crashed. My advice. Watch Carol Kirkwood on BBC 1, she may not get it right but she is a joy to watch on a warm sunny day.  I now have as much faith in all weather forecasts as I do in Astrology...that's absolutely none by the way.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by Ken Smart (U1158196) on Friday, 13th September 2013

    On both BBC TV and BBC Radio within the last day, I've been advised to 'batten down the hatches' by the weather people, as it seems certain we're going to have a bit of a blow this weekend. This is sheer stupidity, as it suggests a certain storm is approaching, and that we all have cause for great concern. The likely truth is that we (in Scotland) are going to have a couple of days of gales, and that we needn't fear for our properties. If these people could just concentrate on giving the viewer/listener the weather report, and leave the dramatics out, we would all be the better for it. Get rid of these drama queens, and just tell us the facts.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by mirandashell (U1946590) on Friday, 13th September 2013

    How does looking out of the window tell you what the weather will be like tomorrow?

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Friday, 13th September 2013

    On both BBC TV and BBC Radio within the last day, I've been advised to 'batten down the hatches' by the weather people, as it seems certain we're going to have a bit of a blow this weekend. This is sheer stupidity, as it suggests a certain storm is approaching, and that we all have cause for great concern. The likely truth is that we (in Scotland) are going to have a couple of days of gales, and that we needn't fear for our properties. If these people could just concentrate on giving the viewer/listener the weather report, and leave the dramatics out, we would all be the better for it. Get rid of these drama queens, and just tell us the facts. 


    Why is it "sheer stupidity" to advise people to 'batten down the hatches' and secure their property when gales are approaching?

    That seems like rather sensible advice to me.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by DaveU (U14266810) on Friday, 13th September 2013

    I think they look out the window before they forecast anything. Mind you if it comes from Salford it's always wet, out check the cricket tests.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by fox_at_moonlight (U15160069) on Friday, 13th September 2013

    I fondly remember the days of the magnetic symbols - which often didn't stick but would slowly slide down the map. And "clouds" that would hinge down to move from cloudy to rain. So many years ago now I can't remember whether or not they were accurate.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Malyndi (U14320297) on Friday, 13th September 2013

    If these people could just concentrate on giving the viewer/listener the weather report, and leave the dramatics out, we would all be the better for it. Get rid of these drama queens, and just tell us the facts. 

    Well, some of us don't want just a robotic readout of the weather - we like the 'human touch' that the forecasters provide! 'Battening down the hatches' always sounds sort of cosy and comforting advice to me...

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 21.

    Posted by The Man Who Watched Television (U15436784) on Friday, 13th September 2013

    Ask any window cleaner or anyone who relies on tourists for there income what they think of the BBC weather forecast and you will hear lots of negative comments & naughty language. I think they should get rid of the bbc weather and put the money towards programmes.

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 19.

    Posted by Ken Smart (U1158196) on Saturday, 14th September 2013

    Why is it "sheer stupidity" to advise people to 'batten down the hatches' and secure their property when gales are approaching? 

    I think I already explained this in my comments. 'Batten down the hatches' is obviously a nautical term from yesteryear, which was only appropriate when a storm was imminent. In these days, sailors actually depended on a strong wind for swift propulsion, and it was only in extreme weather that there was a requirement to secure the ship by closing all hatches. If we're 'battening down hatches' for a strong wind, what on earth do we do when a storm really does approach? The other difficulty I have with this blanket assessment, is the fact that there are huge geographical differences on how these gales will affect the various parts of the country, and it's just plain lazy to tar us all with the same brush. All weather presenters should be told again and again, the story of the little boy who cried wolf, because it's reached the stage where everything they say is taken with a pinch of salt.

    Incidentally, when did you take it upon yourself to respond to comments? Is this further evidence of the BBC's increasing inability to accept genuine criticism?

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Saturday, 14th September 2013

    Incidentally, when did you take it upon yourself to respond to comments? Is this further evidence of the BBC's increasing inability to accept genuine criticism?  

    I've been replying to comments on BBC message boards for nearly fifteen years now Ken.

    If we don't reply to comments we're accused of not listening and not engaging. I guess we can't win, hey?

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Chris Rogers (U10129711) on Saturday, 14th September 2013

    To be fair Peta you do tend to defend the BBC with almost every reply you post... smiley - winkeye

    Re forecasts, I agree. My pet beef is the bizarre language the presenters use, mostly on radio - an odd mix of pseudo poetry ("set fair"), tedious cliches that often mean the exact opposite of what they think ("more in the way of sun") and pet phrases ("cloud amounts will tend to vary') that together make it sound like they are paid by the word.

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 26.

    Posted by captainMouse (U14652804) on Saturday, 14th September 2013

    I wouldn't care what language they used if they were right, but they are not.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 25.

    Posted by Ken Smart (U1158196) on Sunday, 15th September 2013

    I f we don't reply to comments we're accused of not listening and not engaging. I guess we can't win, hey? 
    I can appreciate this - though we would have to question whether your responses are anything other than the ultra-safe 'establishment' view. I doubt if you could dare to be critical of your paymasters. This board used to be a lively place (though I concede that some contributors did overstep the mark), but recently it would seem that comments are modded for the very flimsiest of reasons. This is another reason why I view your own interventions with suspicion. At a time when the BBC is under a dark cloud, the mods seem to be getting sensitive about anything remotely critical. Perhaps they should be looking inwardly to find faults.
    Back on message, the weather here in eastern Scotland has been no worse than wet and windy. Thankfully, I've not yet had to close the door of a mini-greenhouse, let alone batten down any hatches. There may yet be a sting in the tail, but I would very much doubt it. My point has always been, that when a real storm approaches (which it will this winter), we may ignore the warnings given by our forecasters, based on the absolute fact that they continue to behave like drama queens.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by captainMouse (U14652804) on Sunday, 15th September 2013

    No wind or rain here in the south east either day despite forecasts to the contrary.

    Report message29

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 28.

    Posted by Gizmomoo (U10999499) on Sunday, 15th September 2013

    The forecast for the South was for the wind and rain to arrive at 2pm.

    It is now 2.55 and I can confirm East Sussex is both windy and rainy.

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by captainMouse (U14652804) on Sunday, 15th September 2013

    Kent dry and calm the forecast I saw said wet windy in the morning, it was warm and sunny here.

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by captainMouse (U14652804) on Sunday, 15th September 2013

    We have a slight drizzle now

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by old git at 70 (U14213449) on Sunday, 15th September 2013

    If these people could just concentrate on giving the viewer/listener the weather report, and leave the dramatics out, we would all be the better for it. Get rid of these drama queens, and just tell us the facts. 

    Well, some of us don't want just a robotic readout of the weather - we like the 'human touch' that the forecasters provide! 'Battening down the hatches' always sounds sort of cosy and comforting advice to me... 
    I thought Battening down the Hatches was for Monday ( the Saturday morning forecast) . here just inland from Blackpool at 7.45 it was just starting to drizzle ,it was sill only light rain at 9, by 18.00 it was clearing up and the sun was coming out , just as text page 4023 predicted, whoever wrote that forecast last night got the finish correct, and the start of the rain was predicted between 6&9 if I remember corectley. our barometer has dropped from 29.80 to 29.10 , that may indicate wind to come

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by EggOnAStilt (U7111730) on Sunday, 15th September 2013

    As we move from summer to autumn (not the fall) I predict lower temps and some rain on a daily basis. As we then get into October expect high winds for several days, followed by morning frosts as we head into November.

    smiley - friedegg

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by billy_bumble (U14467942) on Wednesday, 18th September 2013

    Almost all forecasts coming from the Met Office ar inaccurate

    Buy a decent barometer - it's all you need together with a bit of common sense

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by Buttey (U14563284) on Wednesday, 18th September 2013

    Almost all forecasts coming from the Met Office ar inaccurate

    Buy a decent barometer - it's all you need together with a bit of common sense 
    No they aren't.

    Out hillwalking this week. Paying particular attention to Met Office forecasts, including timings. Very good, generally highly accurate. Where errors occur then the forecast indicates probability, and so it is plain where there is uncertainty.

    Your opening statement does make it plain that you're finishing statement is without any foundation.

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 36.

    Posted by billy_bumble (U14467942) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    Almost all forecasts coming from the Met Office ar inaccurate

    Buy a decent barometer - it's all you need together with a bit of common sense 
    No they aren't.

    Out hillwalking this week. Paying particular attention to Met Office forecasts, including timings. Very good, generally highly accurate. Where errors occur then the forecast indicates probability, and so it is plain where there is uncertainty.

    Your opening statement does make it plain that you're finishing statement is without any foundation. 
    Whilst you can if you like take issue with the first statement the two are not necessarily dependent

    So you are wrong

    Report message37

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    No, almost all forecasts coming from the Met office are not inaccurate.

    www.metoffice.gov.uk...

    Did you know that:

    our four day forecast is as accurate as our one day forecast was 30 years ago;
    80% of our next day max temperature forecasts are correct to within 2 degrees
    and the Met Office is consistently one of the top two operational weather forecasting services in the world.

    More detailed information on the accuracy of forecasts

    www.metoffice.gov.uk...

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 35.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    Almost all forecasts coming from the Met Office ar inaccurate

    Buy a decent barometer - it's all you need together with a bit of common sense 
    No, almost all forecasts coming from the Met office are not inaccurate.

    www.metoffice.gov.uk...

    Did you know that:

    our four day forecast is as accurate as our one day forecast was 30 years ago;
    80% of our next day max temperature forecasts are correct to within 2 degrees
    and the Met Office is consistently one of the top two operational weather forecasting services in the world.

    More detailed information on the accuracy of forecasts

    www.metoffice.gov.uk...

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    Kent dry and calm the forecast I saw said wet windy in the morning, it was warm and sunny here.  Whereabouts in Kent do you live captainmouse? You're often saying that your forecast is inaccurate. Can you name your nearest town? Do you live in that town or in the countryside? Or near the coast? Near hills? In a valley?

    I'm mystified!

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by captainMouse (U14652804) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    I live in the countryside between tunbridge wells and Maidstone

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Gizmomoo (U10999499) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    I live 9 miles south of Tunbridge Wells on the Kent Sussex border and my weather forecast this weekend was spot on.

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    Okay thanks captainmouse.

    Was it okay for you today? smiley - smiley

    Thanks Giz - that's helpful, maybe we can find out if captainmouse lives in some freak regional weather vortex!

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Eamonn_Shute (U14223612) ** on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    I know of one site that forecasts the amount of rain two weeks in advance, to the nearest tenth of a millimetre!

    One problem is that a rain band can pass close to where you are, so it is impossible to know if it will rain, but they just say rain or dry. It would be more useful if they gave a probability of rain.

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    I know of one site that forecasts the amount of rain two weeks in advance, to the nearest tenth of a millimetre!

    One problem is that a rain band can pass close to where you are, so it is impossible to know if it will rain, but they just say rain or dry. It would be more useful if they gave a probability of rain. 
    As I said earlier, the Met Office is consistently one of the top two operational weather forecasting services in the world....

    So perhaps the one you are thinking of is the other one? What is it called?

    Of course they could be forecasting it to the nearest 10th of a millimetre, but it not be coming true... A forecast is only ever a forecast... smiley - winkeye

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 45.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    I know of one site that forecasts the amount of rain two weeks in advance, to the nearest tenth of a millimetre!

    One problem is that a rain band can pass close to where you are, so it is impossible to know if it will rain, but they just say rain or dry. It would be more useful if they gave a probability of rain. 
    As I said earlier, the Met Office is consistently one of the top two operational weather forecasting services in the world....

    So perhaps the one you are thinking of is the other one? What is it called?

    Of course they could be forecasting it to the nearest 10th of a millimetre, but it not be coming true... A forecast is only ever a forecast... smiley - winkeye 
    I've heard exact rain forecasts during, and I mean *during* F1 races. They are the closest I know, so one 2 weeks in advance would be great. Can we have a link please.

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by old git at 70 (U14213449) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    I know of one site that forecasts the amount of rain two weeks in advance, to the nearest tenth of a millimetre!

    One problem is that a rain band can pass close to where you are, so it is impossible to know if it will rain, but they just say rain or dry. It would be more useful if they gave a probability of rain. 
    As I said earlier, the Met Office is consistently one of the top two operational weather forecasting services in the world....

    So perhaps the one you are thinking of is the other one? What is it called?

    Of course they could be forecasting it to the nearest 10th of a millimetre, but it not be coming true... A forecast is only ever a forecast... smiley - winkeye 
    I've heard exact rain forecasts during, and I mean *during* F1 races. They are the closest I know, so one 2 weeks in advance would be great. Can we have a link please. 
    re the Text weather pages 4061/7, or daily4021/7 , would it not be possible to add an arrow symbol showing the wind direction and a wind speed indication( ie numbers 1/12 of the bueofort scale)

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by Eamonn_Shute (U14223612) ** on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    www.timeanddate.com/...

    This is for Edinburgh, choose your own location. And don't blame me if it's wrong!

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    www.timeanddate.com/...

    This is for Edinburgh, choose your own location. And don't blame me if it's wrong! 
    Thank you for the link, won't blame you if it's wrong, but do feel the whole subject of this thread was about accuracy over prediction. smiley - smiley

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 49.

    Posted by Pancho Wilkins (U1158194) on Thursday, 19th September 2013

    I don't like to whinge, but I like to complain in robust terms. Last Saturday I cancelled a sporting event due to the BBC Weather App informing me that it will rain. It did not. There will be consequences.

    Report message50

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