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Danny Cohen Points of View Special

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  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    BBC’s new Director of TV : We're putting together a special programme which we plan to air in two weeks’ time. We will be interviewing the BBC’s new Director of TV, Danny Cohen, with your questions.

    He is the man overseeing the BBC’s four main channels: BBC One, Two, Three and Four alongside BBC iPlayer and online content.

    Whether you have a general question about content or scheduling or have a specific question about a programme or series that you watch, you can either post them here for the production team or email them directly to: pov@bbc.co.uk

    Some of you might like to send in a viewer video -

    Viewer videos -
    www.bbc.co.uk/progra...

    Send in your opinions via video-phone or webcam. Most webcam software will allow you to record a piece to camera, or you can record yourself on your mobile and download the file to your PC. Then just send it to us in an email!

    Here are some tips on shooting a successful viewer video:

    Make sure you are in a well-lit area that is quiet
    Ensure the microphone is picking your voice up clearly
    Size the shot so that your head and shoulders are clear and central
    Please ensure that your film is no longer than 30 seconds in length and emailed as a file no larger than 10mb.
    Go for it!

    Email
    Send your messages and videoed comments to pov@bbc.co.uk.

    Telephone
    Phone us on 0370 908 3199. (This number is charged as a local rate call from a landline; mobile tariffs will vary.)

    Post
    Points of View
    BBC Northern Ireland
    Belfast
    BT2 8HQ

    You can read more about Danny Cohen's role here:

    Danny Cohen appointed Director, BBC Television
    www.bbc.co.uk/mediac...


    Over to you! Questions for Danny Cohen please! smiley - smiley

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    DOGS

    Many viewers find DOGs an unwelcome distraction - what plans are there to make them less intrusive?

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    On second thoughts, don't bother - he'd say we find them 'helpful'. smiley - doh

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by zelda (U2012536) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    The Wright Way - WHY?

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by GARGLEBLASTER (U3191065) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Many viewers find intrusive foreground music an unwelcome distraction - what plans are there to make it less so?

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by GARGLEBLASTER (U3191065) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Many viewers find intrusive foreground music an unwelcome distraction - what plans are there to make it less so? 

    On second thoughts don't bother, he'll say it isn't.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by Radioactiveoldduffer (U4768882) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Under your leadership of BBC1 why then did BBC2 win more Baftas?

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Stephen Jones - in our hearts we are Greenlanders (U1175342) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Viewers need a "ukip" so cohen will "do a cameron" and start acting on what viewers want and need - instead of just saying the bbc is right and everybody else is wrong.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by man-in-the-moon (U3655413) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    In view of successes such as The Bodyguard,The Wright Way would pilots be a better way to gauge a programmes probable hit with viewers.
    Why was Zen,a hit with viewers, cancelled?

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Viewers need a "ukip" so cohen will "do a cameron" and start acting on what viewers want and need - instead of just saying the bbc is right and everybody else is wrong.  Is there a specific question for Danny Cohen in there Stephen?

    As we see on the boards, viewers have very different ideas about what the BBC should do and broadcast, so we can't just do 'what everybody wants' - not everyone wants the same thing.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by technologist (U1259929) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Many viewers find intrusive foreground music an unwelcome distraction - what plans are there to make it less so? 

    On second thoughts don't bother, he'll say it isn't. 

    Have you seen what he has to say about BGM etc ....
    www.bbc.co.uk/academ...
    but a good topic perhaps!!!

    But another topic could be the HD emission of all BBC TV output.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by 4th Dimension Wanderer (U1461416) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Why in Doctor Who's 50th anniversary has there been so little done to celebrate when BBC America are showing repeats/documentaries galore and why is the anniversary story only an hour long?

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 12.

    Posted by Maxibaby (U14151672) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    It would be nice to see the names of actors etc. after a programme. Why are the credits either squeezed to a minute portion of the screen so a trailer for something else can be shown, or whizzed past so quickly they are impossible to read?

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by seaglennon (U9259670) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Sorry to mention bgm again but I think this is relevant.

    Danny Cohen is the lead "face" on www.bbc.co.uk/academ...

    Perhaps he could provide some information on any ongoing review resulting from these guidelines.
    Have viewer complaints dropped?
    Are there certain types of programme still attracting complaints?
    Are there certain producers/external providers whose programmes still attract complaints even after these guidelines have been produced and what does the BBC intend to do about continual offenders?
    etc.

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by GrouchoM (U14261501) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Why has live sport virtually disappeared from BBC schedules?



    Points of View is the wrong platform for this -Cohen should be tackled head on by an independent person/panel instead of a "yes" man/video show which can can escape with lip-service. Not impressed.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by Stokey Sue (U14258170) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    As he is to be controller of all 4 main channels, will he commit to scheduling across the channels, so we don't get silly BBC internal ratings wars with two new comedy shows being transmitted simultaneously on One and Three (Russell Howard vs., Watson & Oliver), for example) or major documentaries with obviously overlapping target audience simultaneously on Two and Four (too many examples to list)?

    And my current bête noire – can he get all channels to start programmes that are meant to start on the hour to actually start on (or even just after) the top of the hour, and not shortly before? It makes changing channels very hard work and there is no obvious reason why programmes should ever start early, given that the BBC must own the odd clock

    It would of course be even more annoying to have programmes starting early if the closing credits were made legible, so we were tempted to stick with them to the very end. And not chage early

    And while we are talking of credits – why aren’t cast lists posted routinely on the internet pages for the programmes? They are so bitty – it is really hard to find any actual information about he programme – you know, the stuff the punter actually wants to look up, like “Who played the Butler?” or “When is it on?”

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by Stephen Jones - in our hearts we are Greenlanders (U1175342) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Viewers need a "ukip" so cohen will "do a cameron" and start acting on what viewers want and need - instead of just saying the bbc is right and everybody else is wrong.  Is there a specific question for Danny Cohen in there Stephen?

    As we see on the boards, viewers have very different ideas about what the BBC should do and broadcast, so we can't just do 'what everybody wants' - not everyone wants the same thing. 
    The three biggest things: will he get the background music under control? Will he end the credit mutilation? Will he ban the coming next banners? Then, will he get rid of DOGS?

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by thedogcody (U14659366) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Viewers need a "ukip" so cohen will "do a cameron" and start acting on what viewers want and need - instead of just saying the bbc is right and everybody else is wrong.  Is there a specific question for Danny Cohen in there Stephen?

    As we see on the boards, viewers have very different ideas about what the BBC should do and broadcast, so we can't just do 'what everybody wants' - not everyone wants the same thing. 
    The three biggest things: will he get the background music under control? Will he end the credit mutilation? Will he ban the coming next banners? Then, will he get rid of DOGS? 


    In your opinion-but moving on

    I would like to ask what new situation comedies are in the pipeline -like the ones we used to have filmed in front of a live audience-in the style of One Foot In the Grave ,The Good life ,OFAH,Keeping up Appearances, et al

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by GaryB007 (U3895241) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    I notice that most of the points that people are asking POV to put to Danny Cohen are exactly the same points that have been raised for months, or in some cases years, on these boards and in the POV programme.

    I guess that shows just how responsive the BBC have been to viewer feedback in the past.

    What are the chances that anything will happen this time?

    The "We know best" attitude needs to change.

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by brightondancer (U14143740) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    How is it justified to spend vast sums of money buying the voice instead of the BBC developing a shiney floor Saturday night program themselves that can be sold around the world and increase revenue i.e SCD ?

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by Charley Farley (U13513932) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Viewers need a "ukip" so cohen will "do a cameron" and start acting on what viewers want and need - instead of just saying the bbc is right and everybody else is wrong.  Is there a specific question for Danny Cohen in there Stephen?

    As we see on the boards, viewers have very different ideas about what the BBC should do and broadcast, so we can't just do 'what everybody wants' - not everyone wants the same thing. 
    The three biggest things: will he get the background music under control? Will he end the credit mutilation? Will he ban the coming next banners? Then, will he get rid of DOGS? 
    Completely agree with this.

    Perhaps some kind of (independant) survey could be carried out with questions like;
    1. Do you want the credits squeezed into a corner at the end of a program.
    2. Do you want loud "background" music playing during programs.
    3. Do you want the BBC logo to be permanently displayed while you are watching a program.
    4. Do you want the coming next 'spoilers' at the end of a program, telling you about things happening in the next episode.

    and finally from me:
    5. do you want a program (example = Watchdog) to split one story into about four parts (rogue traders) where the beeb remind us of what we saw 10 minutes ago and tell us what we are going to see. In other words, padding a 5 minute story out for about 15-20 minutes.

    A simple yes - no answer would prove that the viewers like these things or not.

    What has the beeb got to lose by asking these questions? answer = nothing......but it can gain a lot by stopping these annoying gimmicks.

    Report message21

  • Message 22

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Chris Rogers (U10129711) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    The BBC makes constant use of live reports in its TV news where there is no need or, if included as an ‘update’ to a pre-recorded report from the same reporter, no new information is added. The wastefulness of this practice was the single most common point raised by readers of the Radio Times when asked recently to nominate one area they wish to see the BBC tackling.

    What is your justification for this?

    Report message22

  • Message 23

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    The BBC makes constant use of live reports in its TV news where there is no need or, if included as an ‘update’ to a pre-recorded report from the same reporter, no new information is added. The wastefulness of this practice was the single most common point raised by readers of the Radio Times when asked recently to nominate one area they wish to see the BBC tackling.

    What is your justification for this? 
    Hi Chris

    Danny Cohen isn't in charge of BBC News, so wouldn't be able to comment on the way BBC News run their services.

    If you'd like to contact BBC News - perhaps they might cover this question in their own BBC News Feedback programme, you can contact them directly - all the details of how to contact them can be found here www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    Report message23

  • Message 24

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Maxibaby (U14151672) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Why is it necessary to have a reporter standing in front of a building (often dark and empty) which is supposed to demonstrate to the idiot viewer that the report concerns politics, the royal family, the weather (forecasters standing out in a gale wrapped up in woollies and scarves), and so on. It must cost a fortune to have the entire camera, sound, director circus transported to these places. Looks like keeping everybody occupied.

    Report message24

  • Message 25

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by designengineer (U11181100) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Many viewers find intrusive foreground music an unwelcome distraction - what plans are there to make it less so? 

    On second thoughts don't bother, he'll say it isn't. 

    Have you seen what he has to say about BGM etc ....
    www.bbc.co.uk/academ...
    but a good topic perhaps!!!

    But another topic could be the HD emission of all BBC TV output. 
    Hey, do you think he'll find time for a shave before the broadcast?

    Report message25

  • Message 26

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Why is it necessary to have a reporter standing in front of a building (often dark and empty) which is supposed to demonstrate to the idiot viewer that the report concerns politics, the royal family, the weather (forecasters standing out in a gale wrapped up in woollies and scarves), and so on. It must cost a fortune to have the entire camera, sound, director circus transported to these places. Looks like keeping everybody occupied.  The same applies to your question Maxibaby -

    Danny Cohen isn't in charge of BBC News, so wouldn't be able to comment on the way BBC News run their services.

    If you'd like to contact BBC News - perhaps they might cover this question in their own BBC News Feedback programme, you can contact them directly - all the details of how to contact them can be found here www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    Posters please don't post any more BBC News related suggestions, contact News directly via the info above. smiley - ok

    Thanks!

    Report message26

  • Message 27

    , in reply to message 22.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Do we still need BBC 2 and BBC 4. There is quite a lot of overlap and If they were combined the BBC could save on one whole channel controller.

    Report message27

  • Message 28

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Lou_25 (U15519963) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Why remake old programmes? Latest example Poldark - with rumours Bergerac is being considered.

    By all means repeat the original - look how well received the repeated I Claudius has been - but let the new programmes be new.

    Report message28

  • Message 29

    , in reply to message 24.

    Posted by Lee (U1149673) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Why is it necessary to have a reporter standing in front of a building (often dark and empty) which is supposed to demonstrate to the idiot viewer that the report concerns politics, the royal family, the weather (forecasters standing out in a gale wrapped up in woollies and scarves), and so on. It must cost a fortune to have the entire camera, sound, director circus transported to these places. Looks like keeping everybody occupied.  Maxibaby - what makes you think there's an entire circus out on location? There'll be a reporter and a cameraman, no one else.

  • Message 30

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Do you think anybody would pay for BBC channels if they were funded by subscription instead of the licence fee?

    If 'yes' - then why not go subscription, so those that don't want it don't have to pay for it?
    if 'no' - isn't that a sad indictment of the current quality of programming?

    Report message30

  • Message 31

    , in reply to message 30.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Do you think anybody would pay for BBC channels if they were funded by subscription instead of the licence fee?

    If 'yes' - then why not go subscription, so those that don't want it don't have to pay for it?
    if 'no' - isn't that a sad indictment of the current quality of programming? 
    Hi Huckerback

    The BBC America channel in the USA is very popular and that's subscription based, so I imagine that even as a subscription-based service, the BBC would do well.

    People at the BBC, like Danny Cohen, can't decide 'off their own bat' whether the BBC should be subscription based or not - that's up to the UK government, who write the remit for the BBC and decide how it should be funded.

    This might be better discussed in the thread that you've already posted to about this topic - here's a link for those who would like to discuss this topic www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb...

    Report message31

  • Message 32

    , in reply to message 29.

    Posted by seaglennon (U9259670) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Why is it necessary to have a reporter standing in front of a building (often dark and empty) which is supposed to demonstrate to the idiot viewer that the report concerns politics, the royal family, the weather (forecasters standing out in a gale wrapped up in woollies and scarves), and so on. It must cost a fortune to have the entire camera, sound, director circus transported to these places. Looks like keeping everybody occupied.  Maxibaby - what makes you think there's an entire circus out on location? There'll be a reporter and a cameraman, no one else.  Is this off topic (see M26) or not?

    Anyway, on many occasions I've seen a 2 camera set-up. There must be some staffing guidelines laid down in the dusty archives of the BBC so why not reproduce them to support your argument Lee? We can only go on what we see.

    Report message32

  • Message 33

    , in reply to message 32.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Why is it necessary to have a reporter standing in front of a building (often dark and empty) which is supposed to demonstrate to the idiot viewer that the report concerns politics, the royal family, the weather (forecasters standing out in a gale wrapped up in woollies and scarves), and so on. It must cost a fortune to have the entire camera, sound, director circus transported to these places. Looks like keeping everybody occupied.  Maxibaby - what makes you think there's an entire circus out on location? There'll be a reporter and a cameraman, no one else.  Is this off topic (see M26) or not?

    Anyway, on many occasions I've seen a 2 camera set-up. There must be some staffing guidelines laid down in the dusty archives of the BBC so why not reproduce them to support your argument Lee? We can only go on what we see. 
    It's off topic. I'm sure Lee didn't mean to lead this thread astray! smiley - blush

    Report message33

  • Message 34

    , in reply to message 31.

    Posted by Huckerback (U14411634) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    People at the BBC, like Danny Cohen, can't decide 'off their own bat' whether the BBC should be subscription based or not - that's up to the UK government, who write the remit for the BBC and decide how it should be funded. 

    But won't Danny Cohen, and other senior BBC bods, be expressing a view to the government? And won't that view be continued funding through the licence fee?

    I'm pretty sure the BBC has advocated particular funding methods in the past, so it would seem an appropriate question to put to the Head of TV.

    www.bbc.co.uk/presso...

    Report message34

  • Message 35

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    I don't know what the senior BBC bods view is on BBC funding - it's not a bad question at all, in that context. smiley - ok


    Keep the questions for Danny coming!

    Thanks all...

    Report message35

  • Message 36

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by Johnnymol (U14690244) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Question for Danny Cohen.

    1. Why is there a lack of pre-watershed family friendly situation comedies on BBC1?

    Report message36

  • Message 37

    , in reply to message 33.

    Posted by Lee (U1149673) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    It's off topic. I'm sure Lee didn't mean to lead this thread astray!  
    No, sorry! Anyway, back to Danny Cohen...

  • Message 38

    , in reply to message 34.

    Posted by victoria (U3941046) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    why cant we see repeats of some of the good old programmes.like
    Laurel and Hardy
    monty Pythons flying circus..
    Parkinsons interviews with REAL celebrities
    Stanley Baxters shows...
    why has he been so ignored ?the programme about him reminded me of just how good he was and a whole young generation don't know anything about him..

    give Dads A rmy a rest for goodness sake,,

    do something about saturday nights very boring tv,,

    Report message38

  • Message 39

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by man-in-the-moon (U3655413) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    What is the future for the BBC's online presence? Are they to be reduced?

    Report message39

  • Message 40

    , in reply to message 39.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    What is the future for the BBC's online presence? Are they to be reduced?  Do you mean the BBC website, or other online presence? Or all! smiley - smiley

    Report message40

  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by germinator (U13411914) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    <quote> Maybe someone from the BBC could be wheeled out to explain why Saturday night television is so poor? Anyone who does not like light entertainment, drama or snooker and who has already seen the steam railways programme on BBC4, has yet another chance to reorganise their sock drawer.
    Also, an interview with Mr James Harding (new Head of News) would allow him to explain how he is going to improve the organisation which he criticised so dutifully while editor of a Murdoch title, (the Times).

    You are not alone in your view of Saturday night television, Victoria.

    Report message41

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Bidie-In (U2747062) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    How is it justified to spend vast sums of money buying the voice instead of the BBC developing a shiney floor Saturday night program themselves that can be sold around the world and increase revenue i.e SCD ?  Once series 2 of The Voice comes to an end, does Mr Cohen intend to bid for the rights to make a further series - or will the BBC try to develop their own entertainment format?

    Report message42

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    How is it justified to spend vast sums of money buying the voice instead of the BBC developing a shiney floor Saturday night program themselves that can be sold around the world and increase revenue i.e SCD ?  That is a fabulous question.

    Order expensive take away and you eat for a day.

    Open your own take away and you not only create your own meals - you sell them to others and keep the incoming flowing in, rather than out.

    Report message43

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 40.

    Posted by man-in-the-moon (U3655413) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    The BBC's website Peta.

    Report message44

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by Peta (U24) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    The BBC's website Peta.  Thanks man in the moon. smiley - ok

    Report message45

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 42.

    Posted by Bidie-In (U2747062) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    Can you explain the commissioning process which brought us "Don't Scare the Hare", "Animal Antics" and "Hammond's Secret Service"?

    And when programmes bomb on such a large scale, would it not be kinder to either pull them from the schedule completely (and destroy the tapes behind the BBC in Salford with an axe) or move them to a very late night slot?

    Report message46

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Dover Soul (U14934992) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    How is it justified to spend vast sums of money buying the voice instead of the BBC developing a shiney floor Saturday night program themselves that can be sold around the world and increase revenue i.e SCD ?  That is a fabulous question.

    Order expensive take away and you eat for a day.

    Open your own take away and you not only create your own meals - you sell them to others and keep the incoming flowing in, rather than out. 
    But doesn't the BBC, according to it's remit, also have to show a certain amount of programmes produced independently?

    Report message47

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Phil-ap (U13637313) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013

    How is it justified to spend vast sums of money buying the voice instead of the BBC developing a shiney floor Saturday night program themselves that can be sold around the world and increase revenue i.e SCD ?  That is a fabulous question.

    Order expensive take away and you eat for a day.

    Open your own take away and you not only create your own meals - you sell them to others and keep the incoming flowing in, rather than out. 
    It implies that it is easy to develop your own progammes that would be as popular as The Voice. I suggest that it isn't. If it were US TV would not need to buy in The Voice, Dancing With The Stars or The X-Factor, it would devise its own progammes.

    Report message48

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by GZ (U5310554) on Wednesday, 15th May 2013


    posted by Phil-ap

    It implies that it is easy to develop your own progammes that would be as popular as The Voice. I suggest that it isn't. If it were US TV would not need to buy in The Voice, Dancing With The Stars or The X-Factor, it would devise its own progammes.
     


    There is one huge difference Phil-ap.

    The US television networks that buy into programmes like The Voice, DWTS, X-Factor are commercial networks and they not only recoup their investment in advert revenues, they turn a huge profit.

    These same networks also do produce original programming which is sold all over the world.

    Some examples directly related to the BBC are the Donald Trump version of the apprentice - for which the template was not only sold to the BBC to create the Lord Sugar version, but the BBC also airs the Donald Trump version as well.

    And also Parks and Recreation.

    The BBC may garner a large audience for The Voice, but it is an expendature with no financial return.

    Report message49

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 49.

    This posting has been hidden during moderation because it broke the House Rules in some way.

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